6

Lithium-ion cells cannot tolerate overcharging at all. So the BMS balance channel is just one cell. Each cell or group of cells in parallel has to be managed independently of the others. The cells may be arranged into groups or modules for convenience but each cell, or group of paralleled cells, will be managed separately. They are typically arranged in ...


5

Not a good idea - Li-Ion batteries really need a proper CC/CV charger. Switching for a fixed voltage supply is not a suitable approach. The charging circuit shouldn't be dying after a month, unless the ICs are defective/counterfeit or wired up wrong. I would suggest identifying the cause of the fault, or using a different charger though one still designed ...


3

The chip you mention is for controlling the DC/DC converter that does the charging. It would be unwise to only use that chip for a Li-Ion system. You would have to combine that with the BQ769X series (7692 for 3-5, 7693 for 6-10, and 7694 for 11-15 cells). They may have chips for 1-2 cells, but I am not sure. The BQ769X series is an Analog Front End that ...


2

Rechargeable options do exist, but there are issues to consider. For the 2032 coin cell, the rechargeable version uses a different chemistry. Its output is 3.7 V, while the disposable version produces about 2.9 V (mid-discharge cycle). There's about a 50% chance the circuit in the toy will burn out with the higher voltage from the rechargeable. Also, the ...


2

The charger circuit in the phone doesn't have to comply with the modifications in the supply. It won't work as you expect. The easiest solution is to modify the charger circuit parameters if it has an kernel driver and accesable interface. I do it on my rooted android phone. When it boots, a script modifies a kernel parameter and sets the maximum voltage 4....


2

No, because the battery charging circuit which actually controls the charging of your phone takes 5V as an input and won't run on anything much lower. As to your side question, you physically cannot charge and discharge a battery simultaneously the same way you can't drink or throw up simultaneously. It's not like a water tank where you can have both an ...


2

Batteries with N series cells like 6 or 12 for lead acid 12 or 24V are made with tight tolerances per cell, yet different cells may not match as well so balancing extends the life of series banks by equalizing the voltage. Thus VI=P bypass capacity to enable equal voltage on each under load charge or discharge. Added 6 Li-Ion cells =6S is a standard "...


1

Don't charge a battery especially a lithium battery without some form of current and voltage limits. Connecting a power supply directly to a lithium battery is a recipe for a fire or battery destruction. At the very minimum a battery charger needs to control and limit the current flowing in to the battery and limit the max voltage to closely match the ...


1

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab If your PSU is floating, you connect the croc from scope on - terminal. You have to pay attention that circuit isn't grounded in any other point (if not floating) then connect scope probes.


1

Panasonic CR2032 specification says: Nominal Voltage (V) 3 Nominal Capacity (mAh) 225 Continuous Standard Drain (mA) 0.2 I would try it with a 4 V source limited to 1 mA. A 4 V supply with a 1 kΩ series resistor should be safe. I suspect that if the battery is flat that it may not recover. It might be enough to get you by though.


1

I assume they are lead-acid batteries. If so, yes, what you are doing will work. Indeed, this is exactly what the industry has been doing for a century. Despite what others have said, imbalance is not a significant issue with only two 12 V lead acid batteries in series, because at the end of charge the most charged battery will handle a bit of overcharge as ...


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