4

The dynamo voltage isn't constant at 12VDC. It will vary depending on how fast the rotor is turning. The dynamo probably can't deliver as much current as the battery. Inverters need a lot of current. Inverters step up the voltage. If you step up to 120V and need 1A of current, your inverter will have to draw 10A of current at 12V. Even if the dynamo can ...


3

You are not seeing an increase in your battery voltage for two reasons: The solar cell is NOT providing its full current/voltage capability, so your perception of 'full sunlight' is wrong. Test your solar panel on it's own and use a light meter to get some idea of the span of capability the panel has. Your ESP12F IS NOT asleep, it's just in a lower power ...


3

You should be able to measure the sleep mode current draw and determine where the current is going. Always active are the L293, the LM1117 and the sleeping ESP. None of these should be close to the notional 150 mA PV input current. The most likely "rogue" load is the ESP not being in sleep mode. You MUST NEVER "float" modern NimH batteries. Older batteries ...


3

over pin 2 and 6 the DW01A sense the votlage drop over the FS8205, if the voltage drop is to high it will detect over current or short circuit and so on. However it's the voltage drop over the MOSFETs that sets the trip point! and the voltage drop over the mosfet varies due to that the RDS(on), varies depending on different operations modes like change in ...


2

You made the battery, shouldn't you be telling us what we need in order to charge it? Typically I would say you need a 400mA constant current with a voltage of 1.41V * number of cells. You would then charge it for 16 hours with some sort of timer. At that rate it would be fairly safe regardless of discharge level, but you still don't want to leave it ...


2

Monitoring the battery voltage The DW01A monitors the battery voltage using its power supply pins (pin 5 and 6 of DW01A ) as shown above. The comparators shown on the left side trigger in case of overcharge (battery voltage too high) or overdischarge (battery voltage too low). The battery voltage is not measured directly. There is an RC filter (R5 & ...


2

The main parameter is the charge rate, or 1C, to determine the maximum current delivered while the battery is being charged. It is important to meet this specification to ensure the battery is not damaged, and to prevent overheating or catastrophic failure. It is equally important to not exceed the maximum charge voltage of 4.2V, nor to discharge below 2.8 ...


2

We can't answer your question (except in general) without knowing the specifics of your system. In general with these kinds of systems the battery can supply the load both while charging and when there's no wind (which is the point of the battery). If the charging current exceeds the load current then the battery will continue to charge until full. If ...


1

Generally, yes, you can build a switch-mode power supply using a microcontroller. It'll certainly be more work than just buying a dedicated controller IC, though, and your digital control scheme must take software reliability risks into account. Here, these risks are increased: if your MCU software fails for some reason, or the MCU doesn't properly power ...


1

You need overvoltage to charge NiMH batteries, or batteries in general for that matter. Do note where it says that constant voltage charging is not a good idea, you need to control the current. According to Wikipedia, the minimum charging voltage is 1.4V per cell so you'd need 4x1.4 = 5.6V to charge it. You should check the charging voltage to make sure it ...


1

Check the battery datasheet for proper voltages that are exactly correct for your battery. Otherwise use safe values. I have a commercial solar battery charger that by default overcharges the battery once per month to 15 volts to equalize the cells. Otherwise it charges it to 14 volts. These voltages can be changed from the user interface. If you use too ...


1

The available charge current is determined by the capability of the outboard transistor and the CC output current. The applications section of the datasheet has typical charge circuits such as the one below: There is a guide on how to choose that transistor starting on page 15 of the datasheet which shows how to calculate the pass element power dissipation ...


1

No, standard, "off the shelf" NiMH batteries have no electronics or monitoring system. If you want a circuit to prevent draining low batteries, look for UVLO or Under Voltage circuits or ICs. https://www.mouser.com/ds/2/268/50002561A-1102171.pdf is an application sheet for a MCP16251 One-Cell Boost Converter with an External UVLO Circuit, compromised of ...


1

will each battery charger IC only pull the required 500mA of current from the main supply line? Yes. Will this design work, and can it scale to even larger numbers? Yes, so long as the power supply wires are thick enough to handle the current without excessive voltage drop. Would a person touching the main line risk getting electrical shock? No. ...


1

There are several effects that can be modeled with increasing complexity, among them: Open Circuit Voltage (ideal voltage source, current unrelated to voltage) Stage of charge (tracks capacity/efficiency and has memory) Linear polarization (adds series resistance) Diffusion voltages (discharge creates polarization, and departure from Open Cell Voltage) ...


1

Chargers that use the USB VBUS as power source are very sophisticated mixed-signal processors, with extended analog functions and digital controllers. Below is a typical simplified diagram of a charger IC that takes and limits the intake, charges a Li-Ion cell in accord with source capabilities and follow CC-CV charging algorithm, and provides system voltage ...


1

Does it really protect my digital circuit in case of Hazardous situations like lightening and others? The data sheet says this about surges: - EN55024, heavy industry level (surge L-N : 1KV), criteria A And all that means is that the unit will survive a 1 kV surge when applied to the AC lines. It doesn't mean that a surge will not produce a knock-on ...


1

At Battery University, Safety Concerns with Lithium Ion (the last source, at the bottom), the following is said: ...Li-ion must not dip below 2V/cell for any length of time. Copper shunts form inside the cells that can lead to elevated self-discharge or a partial electrical short. If recharged, the cells might become unstable... Therefore, before ...


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