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Lowering the duty cycle and adding a load resistor has resolved the issue.


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Expanding on AndyAka's comment: The standard schematic you are referring to can only drive correctly one series of LEDs without other means of current sharing (it also says in the top right corner of your image 10s1p). You either need one TP61169 per parallel string, or even better a four channel backlight driver (for instance, TI's LP8862 has two channels). ...


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Here's the layout you posted: Well... Don't take it personally, but it has all the mistakes we usually find in someone's first switching converter layout. You're not the first to get burned here ;) Layout is an essential part of any switching converter, especially a 1.2MHz one. From the datasheet: So you have two solutions, depending on your goals. If you ...


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Thanks to the helpful replies, I’ve learned about inverting buck boost converters. In case anyone reading this wants to know more about them, here’s some papers by TI: https://www.ti.com/lit/an/snva856a/snva856a.pdf?ts=1605152504969 https://www.ti.com/lit/an/slyt286/slyt286.pdf https://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva721a/slva721a.pdf I’m still not sure why the ...


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There may be faults in unspecified parts of your design. My assumptions. Unregulated part of a Boost Regulator with Storage Cap = 1uF at > 1MHz PWM frequencies due to choice of LC product. Rise times are suitably fast and dead-time prevents shoot-thru between Load and ground switch. Observations and Recommendations Move C1 to output ( presently ...


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A cursory commentary: The 12-0-12 VDC power supply will not work. Putting 24 VDC across two capacitors will not split the DC component evenly, since it relies on capacitor leakage. Look up a similar supply for a tapped transformer. The attempt at a bridge rectifier in the op-amp output is rather odd... why are you grounding both sides of the rectifier? Why ...


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