New answers tagged

0

Well, duh. I forgot about the so-called liquid electrical tape, which is just a paintable rubber that can be had at most "big box" stores. I had some once, but it long ago hardened beyond usability. So I'm guessing that would be pretty good stuff. At any rate, the 5 minute epoxy tested as open circuit, so I'm going to use that, since it'll save me a trip ...


4

To be able to do this job, you need to know the following: Voltage required by the device: you need to stick to the exact rating. Current required by the device: to choose a charger that can at least supply that amount of current. Polarity of charging terminal: so you don't mix the positive and negative and damage the device. Have or be able to get a very ...


0

This operation requires a microscope and medical needles or similar instruments.


2

By connecting both ends of the cable, you are essentially coupling the differential signal. This can be roughly simulated: Essentially what you see in the circuit is your setup. A differential communication bus strongly coupled to a wire and weakly coupled to the supply line. The simulation is run for two different setups (white and blue lines are open or ...


1

with the adjacency you've described, you have exactly balanced charge injection into a differential system ( ignoring the green wire).


0

I'd suggest that RJ-45 and Cat-5 cable is perfectly fine: it's cheap and easy, cables available ready-made in any colour or shape you like without any difficulty. The main downside is risk of connecting to ethernet (wouldn't damage anything, but would it be okay in your environment?), and worth thinking about the power. At 3 metres and 500 mA you can work ...


1

Something else must have changed that causes the signal to reach TV better. Maybe TV firmware got updated and new input equalization settings updated with it. Maybe computer video card driver got updated and it uses more drive strength or pre-emphasis for the signal. Maybe some other devices are off so that there is less interference. And thirty feet is on ...


1

By the ratings ... 0.75 mm2 three core overall insulated cable is rated at 6A for domestic use. Protecting it with a 5 A fuse is therefore compliant with the ratings. 720 W is roughly 3 A, which is less than the fuse rating and the cable rating. If you're using it in a domestic setting, so normal room temperature ambient, then it looks like you're good. ...


0

If you follow a proper EMI concept, then nothing speaks against connecting two devices over I2C. Yes, you should use a twisted pair cable, as this is the weapon of choice against inductive coupling. If you use a shielded cable, you can suppress capacitive coupling, too (You must connect both ends of the shield, but beware of ground loops). You can do even ...


0

Raid the mains electrical parts bin Get yourself plain old commodity line cord (or if a permanent non-moving installation, twin-and-earth) of common size like 1.0mm2, 1.5mm2, 2.5mm2 or 4.0mm2. They make enough of that wire to circle the earth every day, and so it's dirt cheap thanks to economies of scale. You can go look up the resistance per metre on ...


1

The voltage at the second PCB can be calculated through $$ V_{2nd,PCB} = V_{3V3} - 2 \cdot I_{2nd,PCB} \cdot \frac{l_{cable}\cdot \rho}{A_{cable}} $$ Where $$ \rho \approx 1.7 \cdot 10^{-8} \Omega m$$ If your second PCB's lower supply voltage threshold is alright with this voltage drop, you should not worry about it. Just make sure to add some ...


Top 50 recent answers are included