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1

How can i eliminate this "capacitance noise" from my circuit and of course other wires in the cable? Don't use the same cable. Aside from this leakage, there are also safety and legislation aspects involved. Buy special cable where the signal lines are shielded. Load the line. Load it enough that for the capacitance of the maximum specified length it is ...


3

If you take two parallel conductors with an insulator between, you get a capacitor. Ordinary cable may have a capacitance of only a few picofarads per metre. This is very small, but with an AC voltage and a digital multimeter with a very high input resistance, it is enough to show a stray voltage on any un-connected cores of the cable. If you were to try ...


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The wires have a significant capacitance to each other. If your only load on the end is the high impedance of your DMM (at least 1M, often 10M), then it's quite expected to be able to read such a voltage on unconnected wires. When you put a heavier load on them, the voltage will drop to near zero.


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Can I use 1.5mm2 1 core 7/0.5mm2 strand building wire rated for .6/1kV AC in small <24V DC applications. TL;DR While you should be able to use it based on voltage alone, there may be reasons why you shouldn't. Cable has several specifications to meet, voltage related (insulation), current related (area and copper purity), mechanical (insulation ...


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You can definitely use it. Please consider the resistance of the cable. The ohmic losses will reduce the 24 V supply voltage to a lower level at the remote end. If the resistance is 5 ohms for example, in total ohmic losses will be twice the 5 ohms multiplied by the DC current. If that is accounted, then your application should run fine. Shielded cables ...


2

Instead of cutting anything or sticking tape on things, just build yourself a short adapter cable from an inline TRS jack and a TS plug. Then, you can explicitly either wire the R to S or leave it open, as appropriate for your specific signal source. You could even include a small SPST switch that allows you to select either option. In an ideal world, you'...


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Both are terrible "solution" in that they are no solutions at all. Conversion from balanced to unbalanced isn't done by isolating conductors, since the "other" side of the balanced signal isn't at a defined potential. That's the whole point of balanced signalling. The potential difference between the two balanced conductors is driven by an output driver, ...


1

7 milliWatts spread over 60 centimeters will not be detected. The heat will be dumped into the chest, and cooled by the blood. Sunlight is 1,000 watts per square meter, or 1,000 watts per 10,000 square cm. We easily sense sunlight, which is 0.1 watts per square cm. Your heat density is 0.1 milliWatts per cm length or about 0.1mW per 1cm*0.2cm (assuming ...


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Radiation is a negligible component of heat loss for a wire close to room temperature in air. It becomes a factor for long wires in a vacuum, and high temperature differences, but that's not the case here. Convection is the primary source of heat loss for a long wire in still (or moving) air. If it's in contact with skin, conduction will be a big factor. ...


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What do you mean by a wire? Is it an electrical wire, with an insulation? As you have already said, the temperature will depend on the environment (including air flow), surface area of wire and insulation. Additionally, it will also depend on biological factors like blood flow, electrolyte status, perspiration etc. For biological experiments, keep in mind ...


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