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27

When I have a camera, that can take still images at 10fps with a mechanical shutter, why doesn't it mean the sensor can take images at 10fps electronically without producing rolling shutter? In order to understand why, we have to take a look at a typical 3T(ransistor) pixel: This 3T pixel can be used with rolling shutters, but not with (electronic) global ...


26

There is one overriding requirement for deep-space missions: reliability. In general NASA Preferred Parts are quite stodgy, because the overriding need is for a mature, well-understood technology. Cutting-edge technology that doesn't work is frowned upon under the circumstances. So 10-year-old image sensors are about what you expect. Additionally, if you ...


18

There are two parts to this: First, rolling shutter can still occur with (some, see note) mechanical shutters. However, this is only at short exposure times. The shutter is built out of two curtains. Before the exposure, curtain 1 is in front of the sensor. When the exposure starts, curtain 1 moves down (or up or whatever) and starts exposing the sensor. At ...


16

It comes down to market size. Where is the demand for such cameras and do the number of sales justify the production set up costs? You can get an infra red conversion to standard type DSLR cameras (eg Do It Yourself Digital Infrared Camera Modification Tutorials) and you can convert the camera to a 'full spectrum' type which takes in some ultra violet. (see ...


12

Figure 1. Image source: Adafruit. The data is modulated on the 38 kHz carrier as shown in the image above. The 38 kHz is transmitted in bursts and it's the bursts your camera is detecting. You are correct that your camera's sensor will integrate many 38 kHz pulses in one video exposure "frame". Having the carrier frequency makes the system much ...


11

You seem to be under the impression that the quality of photos taken in space is limited by the sensor resolution, which is not the case. Equally important factors are the sensor sensitivity, which gets worse as you increase the pixel count, and the robustness of the optical system. Simply put, if you were to send a 10MP DLSRs camera on Jupiter, it wouldn't ...


11

This is basically a complete camera sensor & lens assembly in a single SMD component. Sparkfun use to sell something like this here - SEN8667 The part that you unscrewed was likely used to focus the lens, although these styles of cameras basically have everything in view in focus (Based on sensor size, focal length & aperture). Below you can see how ...


10

Regardless of which chip is which, it is unlikely that there is an ethernet connection in there anywhere. The processor talks to the wifi module directly rather than over ethernet. Sony wouldn't include the ethernet chips and transformers if there's no external ethernet connection If you need a wired ethernet connection, you will have to get yourself a ...


10

It's not a strong electric shock else you'd be shouting that from the rooftops so, I am presuming you mean something more like an irritating tingle. Based on that assumption I would suggest that the power supply is leaking a little AC current from the power side through to the DC side and this side is also connected to the metal casing around the cameras. ...


9

CCD's are made from Si which has a bandgap of 1.12 eV. This means that it can sense a limited amount of thermal radiation at about ~ 1 um wavelength or shorter. This is called Near IR or NIR. Thermal sensors in the meantime, sense thermally emitted radiation ~ 10 - 14 um wavelength (this is the radiation emitted by a warm body at ~ 300 kelvin). The ...


8

First of all: standard CCD sensors are sensitive to wavelength far beyond 700nm. As much as I know Si-sensors are even more sensitive for near-IR light than for visible light. Of course it changes for much larger wavelengths: One condition for light being detectable is that photons have enough energy to create a hole-electron-pair. This energy threshold is ...


8

I'd say the difference is 20% due to hardware and 80% due to software. The hardware side The smartphone probably has better optics and wider aperture; The smartphone has focusing. The Pi has fixed focus (so it's only good for objects more than 1m away, see hyperfocal distance). But that means that most objects, especially the close ones, are somewhat ...


8

They're often called "board lenses". They can be either integrated in with the sensor, or interchangeable. The interchangeable ones are usually "M12": http://www.m12lenses.com/Board-Lenses-s/12.htm Usually devices with an autofocus will not have interchangeable lenses (since the lens is mounted on a voice coil driver). In your case, it ...


7

Camera flash capacitors are constructed to have low resistance, and more importantly, low inductance, so that they can deliver their energy to the flash tube as quickly as possible — which means achieving a fast risetime on the pulse of current. The internal connections are also made more robust in order to avoid localized heating as a result of the ...


7

Touching a pin does not eliminate the circuit issue, it just hides it. Your circuit still have an issue, and a big one - this particular CAM_DATA[7] bus signal has insufficient timing relative to bus clock, likely an insufficient hold time. A finger, or tweezers, or scope probe all do have some capacitance, 3pF, 5pF, or 10pF. Attaching a probe (or touching a ...


6

Depends on the camera and how "raw" it is. A raw CMOS sensor usually spits data out in a 16-24 bit framed parallel bus. It's the same kind of system you see on the input of HDMI transmitters or some LCD panels. There is usually also an I2C interface for controlling the sensor. Other sensors use the same thing but transmit via LVDS (this is very common with ...


6

It's probably differential GPS, although it might just be two independant regular GPS recievers (hence the minimum suggested distance). All of the product photos show it outdoors, another requirement for GPS. GPS can work at extremely high speeds once it's acquired a good lock; consumer units are not "allowed" to operate at more than 512m/s (about 1800kph) ...


6

It sounds like you are talking about Thermal Infrared, 10um - 14 um wavelength which corresponds to a black body temperature of 300 K. This is what is typically used to image and detect the body heat of mammals. The detector here are either MCT (Mercury Cadmium Telluride) cooled detectors or Bolometer based. The answer is yes, the ambient visible light ...


6

Both your existing answers are valid, but may be taken in combination: Simple Si sensors are good for visible and NIR and are common and therefore cheap. Modifications to the imaging system are required in many cases as the IR is normally blocked because it's undesirable. See for example Canon's EOS 20Da. Silicon sensors are fairly easily adapted to UV use ...


6

I doubt it at 10Mhz, you could think of propagation delay, or the time it takes your signal to travel down your outer layer traces as around 150ps/inch. At 10Mhz you're looking at a 100ns clock period. From that you can see that a few cm will hardly make a difference for you. Your concern about matching is really about making sure you meet your setup ...


6

This is called an image sensor. This particular image sensor in your picture is a CMOS image sensor, commonly found in pretty much anywhere a small to medium sized camera is used, as well in some big and/or professional gear. The camera in your phone is almost certainly a CMOS image sensor. It is probably also the type of sensor captured the image you ...


5

I'm not saying that you will NOT find this data sheet. Do keep trying. But in general, data sheets for SOC's, cameras etc. that are used in the handset market are generally only released on NDA and are not generally available. You can see this on sites like Spark fun that sell the modules but can't supply the data sheets. However, there are a couple ...


5

Note: Some of the information below is anecdotal, since my measurements use a Canon 1D Mark III dSLR, rather than specific light-sensing instrumentation I've just started work on a strobe softbox for my own product photography studio use, especially motion capture (multiple exposure of moving parts in a single frame): I will be using RGB LED strips to get ...


5

For both visible and bolometer type, the reason they are cheap is because they can leverage the economies of scale in the silicon business. As soon as you get out into wavelengths (i.e. energies) that need other technologies (InGaAs as mentioned, InSb) you're talking 2" and 3" wafers at best, nothing like the pizza sized silicon wafers used to make chips ...


5

The general term would be an image sensor, the underlying technology would either be a CMOS sensor (a.k.a. active pixel sensor), or a charge coupled device (CCD). I have no idea which of the two it is based on your image.


5

Think more like 10 years before launch. Once it's designed, it's designed - changing components is a major risk factor and they're unlikely to want to do that. A massive amount of that time will have been spent on testing. This is the appeal of small, semi-disposable satellites with cheap launchers going into Earth orbit - if you lose one then it isn't ...


5

I've been looking into camera interfaces recently too, so excuse me if I misspeak, but I think they're essentially different ways of communicating over the same port, in the sense that TCP and UDP are different ways of communicating over a network. I found a guide discussing the two while referring to an arduino camera shield: CMOS image sensor ...


5

None. That high speed synchronous serial camera is simply not compatible with an Arduino. Nor is USB an option - the Arduino can only be a USB device, which means it cannot talk to another USB device, but only to a USB host. Generally speaking, trying to put any sort of camera on an Arduino is a severe mistake - not only are there no efficient interfaces, ...


5

Allright, finally we done it! @KalleMP had the eye opener, however this was a slightly different battery (DMW-BLG10E instead of the DMW-BCG10E and it is fore sure another "valid and safe battery detection method"). It is not enough to fool a temperature sensor, you really need the battery IC (whatever it might be) to get it working. Also great thanks go to @...


5

No, because the 38kHz is turned on and off to send data, it won't be continuous 38kHz signal. And the code is repeated few times per second. But yes, if it was a continuous 38kHz modulated light, the camera would see it just being lit.


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