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12

Figure 1. Image source: Adafruit. The data is modulated on the 38 kHz carrier as shown in the image above. The 38 kHz is transmitted in bursts and it's the bursts your camera is detecting. You are correct that your camera's sensor will integrate many 38 kHz pulses in one video exposure "frame". Having the carrier frequency makes the system much ...


11

This is basically a complete camera sensor & lens assembly in a single SMD component. Sparkfun use to sell something like this here - SEN8667 The part that you unscrewed was likely used to focus the lens, although these styles of cameras basically have everything in view in focus (Based on sensor size, focal length & aperture). Below you can see how ...


8

They're often called "board lenses". They can be either integrated in with the sensor, or interchangeable. The interchangeable ones are usually "M12": http://www.m12lenses.com/Board-Lenses-s/12.htm Usually devices with an autofocus will not have interchangeable lenses (since the lens is mounted on a voice coil driver). In your case, it ...


5

No, because the 38kHz is turned on and off to send data, it won't be continuous 38kHz signal. And the code is repeated few times per second. But yes, if it was a continuous 38kHz modulated light, the camera would see it just being lit.


4

Remotes don't transmit continuously. The output signal looks like bits modulating a 38kHz signal, then a pause like a few tenths of a second, then another transmission. So it'll look like it blinks, but that's probably not an effect of the 38kHz modulation, rather the pauses between retransmissions.


3

I have an FLIR E series camera, they work with two cameras (infrared and visible) and overlay the images on one another. Sometimes not very well. The L[epton only works with infrared (not visible) and has two outputs][1] Spectral range - Longwave infrared, 8 μm to 14 μm The spectral range is the wavelength which is 8 to 14um Output format - User-...


2

If I shine a 150-lumen flashlight at a monitor or webcam constantly for 5 minutes will it result in damage? 150 lumen is a few hundred milliwatts, and it will be distributed over a wide area, so heating will be negligible. At that power level you would need a very small spot to do any real heating.


2

is it possible to interface a bus of DVP lines from all cameras (connect all outputs in parallel with each other) so I don't have to use one processor per camera? Probably, yes, but it's probably way harder than you think: even if the resolution and precision of these frames coming out of the camera module are crappy, these are still relatively high-speed ...


2

All you need to worry about is supplying the correct votlage with a supply that can produce enough current. A 100 Ω resistor is plenty close enough. This should work fine.


2

This is a very dangerous idea. Your questions and your diagram show the potential for you or someone to get badly hurt. The only safe way is to place the camera outside the unmodified microwave oven. Make a hood to screen out ambient light. Buy a microwave with a black coloured screen instead of a white one. But don't go modifying the microwave. Some more ...


2

That's not a chip but a missing resistor network. Most likely identical to the ones near it.


2

You can't do AR by simply placing a "transparent screen" over someone's eyes — the screen will be horribly out of focus. There are two possible approaches that are commonly used: Use a VR (non-transparent) display, but mix the image from your camera in with the picture elements generated by the augmentation software. Use an optical beam splitter ...


1

Actually, polarizers are good filter for this case. Buy a sheet from amazon ~$12, cut it and stack that 90 deg. It blocks visible light (red glow) and allow near infrared to pass. Remember not to block the camera if your led is right next to it. In my case it works really well though you still see a tiny bit in pitch black room. My baby doesn’t stare at it ...


1

I have these LEDs too. There's a tiny potentiometer (near the black wire in your picture) which adjusts their brightness and changes how ambient light affects the light induced shutoff. If you turn them up too bright (without adequate heatsink) they start flashing. I don't know if this is a safety feature or a failure mode, but if you turn down the ...


1

Is it possible to integrate audio data to the same USB bus from EZ USB CX3 ? yes. USB hubs, and a separate USB sound card. 10€. If with "audio" you mean playback: Literally the first page of the CX3 datasheet: I2S master (transmitter only) at sampling frequencies of 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 96 kHz, and 192 kHz (if in doubt, ...


1

In this video a man used a camera with a switching IR filtering lens to show that you can filter visible light yourself with a burned picture film or some other tools. In the case you can't simply toggle off the camera's IR filter, you might still have a lot of work removing it, but with this technique (I didn't test) you could theoretically make a visible ...


1

Your Husky module seems to use an OV2640 camera. That's the same camera the ESP32 Cam uses. This person took the OV2640 from an ESP32 Cam apart and removed the IR filter. Removing the IR filter will change the way the camera sees color, and you'll need to adjust the focus so that the IR image is sharp rather than the color image. A summary of the process: ...


1

It depends: 0xBA is the write address, while 0xBB is the read address.


1

I have the same laptop - HP Pavilion dv 6000 You can see 4 wires coming out of web cam module. White, Green, Red and Black This is my connection to USB cable. Check continuity of the wires with a multi meter if you have it. Mine did not work as there was some wire breakage inside the wire sleeve. Had to figure it out This is the USB - web cam connection. ...


1

You are in luck. The camera is indeed a USB webcam. All you have to do is to properly wire it to a USB cable. Someone here has already found the connections for a similar model. The pins and color codes match yours. Red: +5 : Pin 3 : USB +5V Pin 1 (Red) White: Ground : Pin 1 : USB GND Pin 4 (Black) Black: D- : Pin 5 : USB Pin 2 (White) Blue D+ : Pin 4 : ...


1

I've solved the problem by supplying the camera lower supply voltage (8.5V) by using DC-DC step down converter. It seems that signal generated by camera is better or more acceptable for display to recognize as proper video signal. @Justme also provided explanation why that could be the the case: The video signal peak amplitude and average depend on how ...


1

Of course it is possible. But is does not work simply by connecting USB wires to camera. It just needs a interface board with chips that talk USB on one end and talk with the camera interface at the other end. So if you know what interface the camera module has and what is the pinout mapping and voltage levels used on the camera, it can be interfaced. There ...


1

Finally, it worked! orange & yellow=GND Black=VCC brown=data+ red=data-


1

You are lucky with Canon. You need to look at two projects : CHDK : Small cameras. https://chdk.fandom.com/wiki/CHDK MagicLantern : Digital reflex, "DSLR" https://magiclantern.fm/ (Only older models are supported.) You could build custom version of these firmwares with additional features. It is also possible to run scripts directly from CHDK or ...


1

Copying from here: RPi OCR or how to read a number from the camera Answered by Ghanima "I recently used Tesseract which is an OCR software that's open source and it gives highly accurate results. To install it on pi, type in the command line: sudo apt-get install tesseract-ocr Then set a camera to periodically take pictures preferably using Cron (which ...


1

I encountered the same problem that you have, in my case, I am controlling a camera module for a SYMA X8C Venture drone. The board is probably completely identical to yours. The three pins are connected to a headphone jack, but I soldered on some wires to replace to hook it up to a breadboard so I could easily manipulate it. Photo of the board: Also, good ...


1

Yellow is often a composite video signal. Connect an oscilloscope to it and see if it looks like a video signal. From the Hackaday link: There's a fourth pad by the yellow wire. That might be a digital input to trigger an image capture. Check that extra pad and the yellow wire. See if either has 5V DC on it. If so, short it to ground through a low ...


1

If the tiny LED flashlight on your other phone could damage your new phone's camera, then trying to take a picture in sunlight would obliterate your phone.


1

The Raspberry PI can support a camera module that's something like what you'd find in a phone (small camera on a flex mount.) The interface is MIPI CSI-2. There are a number of suppliers who support their specific pinout.


1

Depending on what supporting hardware you are using, laptop cameras might be interesting. They are small, can be bought for a few dollars only and often connect over USB. If you use a microcontroller that can run Linux, you can probably connect to the camera. See more info in this video: https://youtu.be/CouxmNqxO4A


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