42

You are confusing certification and emissions requirements. Only intentional radiators need to be certified. From your description, your device is not a intentional radiator. However, you are still obligated to ensure it does not radiate excessively. The limits are defined in part 15 of the FCC rules. How you determine for yourself and ensure that the ...


28

I have found answer on Google. It's a Japanese version of FCC mark. Radio equipment conformity certification. See this LINK!


27

I know this is an older post, but after reading it I was a little troubled to see so much miss-information and ignorance in the comments that I had to chime in. My background? Over 20 years in regulatory compliance and testing. I am also a Telecommunication Certification Body for FCC certification in the United States. I'll take your points one by one; 1) ...


18

Its not about how much you sell or liability (a mark doesn't protect you from anything if you burn someones house down, but a safety mark will help prevent you from making mistakes) I would also like to mention that there are retail boards that will not sell your product if it doesn't have a UL mark on it. The short answer is: safety compliance is ...


14

That's a Chinese RoHS / recycling indication: Under RoHS 2, manufacturers must indicate dangerous chemicals inside on the outside. The number in the circle is an indication for the "Environment Friendly Use Period", the period in which it's safe the contained substances will not leak out. 10 in your circle means that it's pretty safe that for 10 years, no ...


14

You do not need to pay anything if USB logo and the word "USB" is not important to you and you are happy using a non-unique Vendor ID code. The logo is protected by trademark and copyright and you receive a license to use it with conditions. One of those conditions is that you conduct certification testing. The Vendor ID is how they make sure you pay to ...


13

There are two types of testing that must generally be done on a new electronic product, safety and emissions testing. In addition, if you have a medical product, then there are additional standards you must follow. In the US, UL (Underwriters Laboratories, a private testing laboratory) requires third party safety testing to be performed before a UL mark ...


13

The questions you need to be asking are. Is there even a remote possibility that this widget can catch fire or electrocute someone? If the answer is yes, (which it almost always is) then. How big is my bank account? Can I afford, and find, the insurance? Can I handle living on the street for the rest of my life? The thing people always forget is, UL ...


11

All intentional radiators must be certified to the FCC regulations. Since you said "transceiver", it implies this device is in part a transmitter. Selling a intentional radiator, such as your device, without FCC certification in the United States is a federal offense. All your units can be confiscated, you can be fined, and in some cases worse punishments ...


8

Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 15 (47 CFR 15) of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and regulations regarding unlicensed transmissions. Nearly every electronics devices sold inside the United States radiates unintentional emissions, and must be reviewed to comply with Part 15 before it can be advertised or sold in the US market. The ...


7

Search the FCC database by their stated FCC ID code: http://transition.fcc.gov/oet/ea/fccid/ The first 3 or 5 characters is the Grantee Code (assigned to a company). There isn't an equivalent for CE.


6

UL listing is most common in consumer goods, and appliances in particular. The reality is the consumer doesn't really care whether or not a product is listed. The people that care are the retailers and insurance companies. Consider a Wun Hung Lo toaster with so many corners cut in design and manufacture, it's a circle. Walmart buys a shipping container at $...


5

Well, you can also call it a banana type 1 enclosure then or whatever else you want, because the name is rather meaningless, if it is not bound to a specification. I guess you are referring to the NEMA enclosure types, which states type 1 to be General-purpose. Protects against dust, light, and indirect splashing but is not dust-tight; primarily prevents ...


5

CEC Level VI Efficiency standard. More info here


4

CE can be self-certified, so there's no central register of products. The manufacturer is still obliged to keep records of the certification process: they should be able to give you a copy of their report.


4

There is nothing wrong in using open source software or hardware to design medical devices. But at end of the day provider of these equipment has to comply with regulation in jurisdiction the devices are sold. I have experiences ubuntu (Linux) computers used in US doctors offices. In general in USA and Europe the devices have to be compliant to government ...


4

You make contact with their engineers regarding your requirements- the device specifications and the standards it is supposed to meet, submit what they require for testing, and hand over a moderate size pile of money. If iterations are required, the pile gets higher. Other testing companies can test to CSA standards, just as CSA can test to UL or other ...


4

You generally don't need to do new tests. The test you have done before putting the product on the market are what applies. The age of the test protocol is not relevant, as long as the test complies with current legislation. If the standards or directives change in the future, you only need to carry out new tests if there are significant changes of the ...


4

You will require an emissions certification for your product. The certification process would include your complete product in it's enclosure and would have to be tested with any normal accessories like an AC adapter attached. It is also typical that representative cables must be plugged into all interface connectors that would normally be used during ...


4

Ok, there's different things that go under the name of "CE". First of all, for a whole class of consumer electronics, being CE certified means that you, as importer or producer, guarantee that the device complies to regulations and is safe. That just means you sign a letter that says you guarantee that. Yes, that makes you responsible for making sure your ...


4

CE marking is an administrative marking that indicates conformity with health, safety, and environmental protection standards for products sold within the European Economic Area. The CE mark is mandatory for 'machinery and equipment', irrespective of individual components being CE or FCC certified. The CNC product would definitely fall under this category. ...


3

Really the best way to get an answer to questions like these is to call your test house and just ask them, even if you are a first time customer they'll tell you things like this for free. That said I wouldn't say you are treated as a unintentional radiator per se. You just no longer have to do the intentional radiator testing as long as you are using the ...


3

In this context, enclosure type seems to be a NEMA thing. There are many types listed in that document, here is a small sample for completeness. Type 1 Enclosures constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure ...


3

Certifications and legal requirements aren't the same thing. There are no certifications that are actually required by law since your device does not contain a RF transmitter (those do need certification). The only legal requirements are that the device not radiate radio waves above some limit, and that it not conduct signals back onto the power line above ...


3

You can pay big money for any ISO specification so my first port of call would be MIL-STD-810F which you can download for free - at least you can use this to help develop what tests you want to perform. Here is also a wiki link to what it's about. Here's an overview: - I'll also add that I've seen this spec quoted for components such as crystals, mems and ...


3

As far I know, FCC only limits the maximal EIRP power (mean value in all directions, measured @3meters). So no problem to be +/-1dBm under condition that the most powerfull device stays under limit (And it should not be a problem if you follow the reference design). This Nordic White Paper gives some information about regulation. However to have precise ...


3

Trevor's answer is a good one. Liability is one of the primary reasons to become UL-listed. Here are some additional thoughts: Underwriters Laboratories ("UL") is only one of many testing and certification companies referred to as "NRTLs" (Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories). Others may be preferrable; there is a list of other NRTL's here on ...


3

When it comes to CE marking it all depends on which directives your product falls under. The Low Voltage Directive 2014/35/EU applies to all products which operate between 50 - 1000 VAC and 75 - 1500 VDC. In your case, as your device is only operating from 30V you shouldn't have to conform to the LVD. The EMC Directive 2014/30/EU applies to pretty much ...


3

IEC 61000 are "basic" standards which contains the measurement techniques. IEC 61326 is a Product Family standard which contains conditions, limits and performance criteria for equipment for measurement, control and lab use. Standards are applicable in this order Product Standard, if applicable, otherwise Product Family Standard, if applicable, otherwise ...


3

FDA has got a guidance document for ultrasound systems and probes. There is also the IEC 60601-2-37 standard (it can be difficult to read and follow). The testing is done using one or more of the following methods: hydrophone, schlieren photography, radiated force measurement. There are companies who specialize in making measurements for the safety ...


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