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I think you have either a BLS-65 or BLS-66. According to the manual, here you need a 7.4V DC charger that will supply at least 1000ma of current and have the correct connector. Specification: Prim. voltage: 100-240 V AC 50-60 Hz Charging voltage: 7.4V DC Output current: 1000 mAh ±10% Battery pack: 2x 18650, 2200 mAh


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If the slides represent a dynamic sequence as illustrated here: https://www.physicsclassroom.com/mmedia/estatics/isop.cfm Then I think the point where ground touches the sphere does not matter for the net result, that is, the sphere will take a positive charge when the ground connection is removed. The location of the ground connection is relevant for the ...


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(b) The diagram demonstrates that charges can move from one side of the sphere to the other. That indicates that the sphere is conductive. (c) When the sphere is connected to earth. Some negative charges flow to earth. (d) If the earth connection is then removed, it is left with a positive charge. (e) When the negatively charged rod is removed the charges re-...


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A more nuanced answer than you received so far is that 4.27 V is not a significant problem as long as the charger is turned off (disconnected) after the cell is full. Then, the cell voltage will relax down to a safer value. Compared to charging to 4.2 V, the advantage of a higher charging voltage is that it stores a tiny bit more energy in the cell. The ...


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Charging a Li-Ion battery to 4.27V probably won't cause a fire, but it would make me uncomfortable. Your batteries will likely suffer from a reduced lifetime however. Fully charging and discharging the battery puts stress on it. That stress will reduce the lifetime of the battery, and the capacity will continue to reduce as time goes on. To limit the stress ...


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I am in agreement w/Mike & the constant wrapping up the wire when not in use. I work w/copper when creating jewelry. Too much bending of the wire, even if insulated, will put stress on the copper & so does the heat going through the copper. Probably best to just let the cords dangle from a hook or something.


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Based on the new picture, you have a basic USB-C PD device. It can charge at 18W via 9V 2A or 15W via 5V 3A. The 18W is faster for the battery to charge from. Just use a suitable usb-c PD power supply that has 9V 2A output. They will all have a 5V out per USB standard. The power bank will negotiate the 9V PD from the charger and will not alternate until its ...


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I'll try to simplify this. 5Vdc/3A ,9Vdc 2A are simply the specification for the technology called USB PD (power delivery). The portable device would communicate with the charger to provide the desired output, either 5V or 9V. However, one should be careful to ensure that the devices are compatible and prevent unintentional failure. Therefore, I would ...


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Fast charge may cause the battery overheating. The battery temperature should be supervised.


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Assuming the phone is meant to charge via a USB cable, then the charging speed is defined by the relevant USB standards, and possibly proprietary standards defined by the manufacturer. Charging speed is also determined by charging circuit in the phone itself. If the charging circuit in the phone only draws a little current, then the battery won't charge ...


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Because some chargers adhere to the standard for fast charging a phone with the same standard. Like to fast charge an older iPhone required resistors on the data line and to fast charge an older galaxy phone you needed Samsung Adaptive Fast Charge. Or newer phones require QC2 then QC3 or USB C PD with the right profiles or Apple certified MFi. The max charge ...


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