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3

I expect that ISP means "In Same Package" or "In Same Part": -


3

Try something like this behavioral model: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab I'll leave the details of design to you, since you know your application space better. At such high compliance voltages and over such potentially high sink/source currents you will certainly have to do some thermal analysis and make adjustments. You'll ...


7

I haven't found a distributor, but a (the?) manufacturer is Dalvey Products Supply Ltd.; it's in their catalog here, and the datasheet is here. It's an unusual component, and it may well have been a production run specifically for Casio. On the other hand, email is cheap and you could ask them if and where you can buy one, or if they will send you a sample. ...


5

It is consistent with the symptoms of no audio through the speakers. You could probe with a scope to check if there's signal, or just short the pins that should be shorted by the dead switches and check if the loudspeaker works. I guess this is what the illustration means: When you insert the jack, the springs are pushed (red arrow) so pin 4 no longer ...


5

I think it is a fuse, mainly because of the "F3" marking next to it, and because I have seen this cryptic marking before on a Littlefuse fuse. A photo with more "context", and a look at the traces of the PCB would help to make sure it is indeed a fuse. If Littlefuse's markings happen to be universal, which I am not sure of, you can find ...


0

Switches are complex. They can get extremely complex when related to audio signal (they can even introduce noise and distortion - everyone old enough to remember relay-switched networks of wired phones can confirm). The rating of a switch is more or less experimentally determined. In general, the lower the voltage, the higher the current rating. The same ...


10

Current and voltage ratings do not neccessarily apply at the same time and in a single operating point. A switch is a pretty good example for this: it must not conduct a current higher than the rated current. This is relevant when the switch is closed. a voltage higher than the rating must not occur between the switches contacts. This is relevant when the ...


7

That switch is for AC mains wiring at either 50 Hz or 60 Hz depending on which is prevailing in your locale. It is not rated for audio at all. So you just have to try it out and see if it works. In general, lower frequencies are harder on a switch. DC is the hardest. Higher currents are hard on a switch. Higher voltages don't necessarily put a lot more ...


5

During switching there is more arcing at higher voltage than at lower voltage. Switches have a voltage limit, but they also have different current limits at different voltages. There are also wattage limits sometimes, and the rated limits may be different for different loads, depending on if they are resistive, inductive or capacitive.


1

The official term is "spring loaded connector".


2

I have used lots of such connectors in my previous projects, we call it Pogo pin.


2

Parallel connection and increasing total Ah (batteries are from different manufacturers). That's a really bad thing to do. You should never connect batteries / battery packs in parallel unless you REALLY know what you're doing and then the batteries should be of the same model and preferably of similar age and wear level. If you ignore this advice and do it ...


0

OMG ! That's a Siemens MKT range capacitor, 2.2nF or 2200pF whichever you prefer, 630V. Polyester film. Used to see lots of them decades ago, Once very popular, especially in European products. The capacitance value is proportional to the length of the body, which is 'cut' to length to suit the value. Available in 5mm and 7.5mm pitch.


1

It is the symbol of an electrolytic capacitor whose value is 10 micro farads and its maximum working voltage is upto 16 volts. These capicitors have two legs, one is positive and other is negative. Longer leg is positive and shorter leg is negative. In the symbol shown above inner leg is Positive( +) and outer leg is negative ( - ). Generally all ...


2

This is an obsolete symbol for a electrolytic capacitor. Also it looks like drawed in reverse, the T-Bar in the top is a symbol for ground. The large C shaped side would be the negative terminal of the capacitor, and the T-bar within the C shape is the positive terminal.


1

Ceramic resonator (3 lead type), probably 4 MHz. Fits the bill on account of the X1 board identifier (X is normally a crystal but resonators fit the bill well). Ceramic resonators are often used in inexpensive consumer items as they're cheaper than crystals at some expense in specifications.


0

[OP:] The equations that I get for the circuits the similar to Hamiltonian of graphene. Here, the inductances and capacitances act like some parameters in the Hamiltonian and I want to vary these parameters to see how the behavior of the system changes. It appears that you are trying to simulate "the behavior of the system". Excluding the ...


1

The 1-turn 10K pot linked below (UXCELL, on Amazon) includes a small indentation on its metal case that acts as a stop. By drilling out the indentation with a 1/8" bit, you can convert it into a continuously rotatable pot without having to disassemble the pot. To avoid getting bits of metal inside the pot, drill the stop material until it is fairly ...


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