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0

Old post.. had same issue. Deleted in schematic... updated PCB so it got removed... then undid remove in schematic and could place it back.... Thinking of it, I was playing with rules and it came back with rule conflict. Maybe it is caused by an 'DRC error'. Next time I will try to switch of DRC and have a go again.


8

What electric component is this? It is a capacitor. My Multi-function Tester says it is a capacitor with a value of ~8958 pF (=8.9 nF) It says "K103M" on top of it. Could this mean that it should be 10*10^3 = 10000 pF? It is a 10nF capacitor, the K and M I believe are the voltage and tolerance, I believe that the letter at the beginning is the ...


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1N4001 diodes are quite chunky rectifier diodes. They should work fine, but are a bit over-the-top for your application. On the plus side, they are extremely cheap. If you want less voltage drop across the diodes, then Schottky diodes only drop about 0.2V, rather than 0.6V for a standard silicon diode. If you want smaller diodes, then go for a small ...


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Yes, there is a better way. Just remove all the diodes, they are rather useless - just don't plug it via USB while it is connected to C64. The MCU pins can be controlled to either pull down or float at high impedance by setting it as input (without pull-up being enabled). Writing the MCU software so that there is no chance of mistakenly set a C64 port ...


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You can use numeric literals together with the keyword AKO (A Kind Of) to step between .MODEL definitions, and numeric literals instead of names for .SUBCKT, but with certain conditions. Example #1: The name of Q1 is {x} which, because it's between curly braces, it will be evaluated. If it was simply x, it would have had to have a .MODEL X ... defined. The ....


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These are not strictly discrete NMOSFETS, but actually NMOS analog switches arranged to form quad 2:1 MUXs: ADG774A. I guess it is still relevant for this topic, as NMOS switches are a prime example of the usefulness of 4-terminal MOSFETs. I recently became aware of this part when looking into low leakage switches. Their specs are so far beyond the ...


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I did an image search for "illuminated tactile switch" It looks like the SPJ series by Shanpu: https://www.shanpu.com.tw/en/product/tags/1/Tactile-Tact-switchees More precisely the SPJP3******** based on the documentation.


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It's the transformer. But in my opinion its way too far away from the rectifier and the mains connection That's because it's a switching supply. Mains is rectified first, resulting in about 320V DC in the two blue CrapXon caps, then this is chopped into a square wave, fed into the transformer, and rectified in the other side. The frequency is much higher ...


1

Open the various individual libraries in Altium. Open the your new target library. Right-click on the component, in the component panel list, that you want to include in your new library, and select 'Copy'. Right-click in your new library and select 'Paste' in the component list. This works for both Schematic and PCB libraries. Going from Eagle to fAultium ...


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Those are EMI filters. They are basically T filters, with two inductors in series, passing from first to third pin and a capacitor from the middle pin to the middle pin of the two inductors.


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FL is usually the designator for a FiLter, I believe. Most likely, they're a simple filter network of some sort, probably either to filter noisy input power or to filter noisy signal lines.


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If anyone is having this same problem I figured out a super easy and obvious solution. Using the above RPX-1.0 as an example. I found the part in mouser then under models I selected "RPX-1.0-R Symbol & Footprint by SnapEDA" Which I can then download the footprint and schematic onto eagle, or a variety of other software. You do have to make an ...


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SATA is quite an old standard. NVMe drives are directly connected to the PCI-E bus for speed reasons and do not need any chip to interface them to it. Perhaps use some NVMe drives instead of SATA and you won't face this issue.


3

It's probably a 6uF/9V tantalum electrolytic capacitor. They don't usually go quietly so I suspect it's okay. The end with the white line is the positive end. Photo from here


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These are often referred to as turret connectors or turret lugs.


9

It was a reed relay. Perhaps you can purchase a reed capsule to replace the one you broke. You can also purchase complete reed relays if you know the coil voltage. Check a distributor such as digikey.com for various options.


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That's a reed relay. It works like a regular relay. Current through the coil causes the contacts to close. They are usually for low current only. You'll need to find out what the driving voltage is to get a proper replacement.


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What Is This Component? It's the outer magnetic coil of a reed relay. The two axial connections connected into the glass body are for the reed contact: - The picture above shows the coil (bottom) and a couple of reed contact options with the top being a SPNO. The lower one looks like a 4PNO device But they could easily be NC types. Here's an article that ...


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These look like MELF package resistors as others have said. It's hard to tell the exact colour of the rings from the photos. To me they all appear to have five coloured rings, brown black black red (slightly wider gap) brown, although some are fitted "back to front". This would make them 10K with 1% tolerance. Other evidence supports this: Note ...


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I think they're 12K MELF resistors. So there's a 12K pull-down or pull-up, and a series 12K resistor to an input divider or something like that. The divider resistor appears to be 1.82K which would give about 3.2V for 24V in. The choice of MELF resistors is probably related to power and voltage withstand under extreme EMI or fault conditions. Try to trace ...


0

On the lower photo... All MELF’s are 1W ~ 5922m 5 are BrRdBkBk 12 Ohms 10%. 1 is BrBkBkRd 10 Ohms 2% As I indicated in comments this is for partial impedance matching low Ron 25~33 to reducing ringing for some unknown load and lower BEMF for flyback protection or just stock items. Upper Photo is similar but all 10 Ohm 2% When driving relay interface cable ...


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Just make sure the device is unplugged while working on it. The switch just serves to pass the hot phase to the device. You probably bent an internal contact in the switch, or deformed some plastic component that holds the switch latched. If you don't mind loosing the on-off switch, I'd just solder together the switch input-output, meaning once plugged in ...


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They are independent and you would need a current limiting resistor with applied voltage. Include link to datasheet next time pls.


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Get the datasheet for the part, then check, there are two things that need to be checked: Pinout At the end of the day the pins on the part need to match the pins on the PCB (otherwise bad things might happen, like connecting GND to VCC and smoke results), especially for SMT parts. In CAN programs the pins are numbered, and almost everyone follows the same ...


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I think it says "15B" rather then "I5B", in which case the marking corresponds to PTZ15B. The "38" indicates a manufacturing date according to the datasheet.


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I was having this same exact issue on Altium 21. Press "Shift+C" to clear filter. Or right click and use the click the "Clear filter" option. The issue would arise when I would search for a reference designator in the search bar or use the cross probe tool.


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