24

Most likely many reasons, at least the following. It was a requirement for the connector to support hot-plugging. The connectors you mentioned do not support hot-plugging. Using an existing connector also means it is possible for someone to plug in two incompatible devices together just because they use the same connector. The connector also needs to ...


21

Compatibility with existing connectors is an anti-feature Let's imagine they used the then-common DB-9 DE-9 for USB. What would happen? Lots of mice used a DE-9, and it's used in a lot of other serial ports. People would be plugging a serial mouse into the USB port, and become frustrated when it didn't work. Availability of USB connectors is a problem ...


19

While one might expect that the socket's contacts would be a round metal receptacle, there is another design that looks like a fork. The two extensions of the fork make contact with the plug's pins by contacting the pin on either side. This fork-contact has a flat profile, and during manufacture, it is inserted into the slot that you see as a "line". The ...


11

Something may be adding to the confusion. There are indeed 2 different types of 5-pin DIN connector. In this image they are called 5-way 180º and 5-way 240º, and yes, there is a difference in angle between them. 5-way 180º: centerlines of the holes are across a 180º arc 5-way 240º: centerlines of the holes are across a 240º arc The one you need for MIDI ...


8

They Learned from Parallel & Serial Ports Until the IBM-PC came along, the "typical" parallel port was the 36-pin "Centronics" connector. Then IBM decided to use a DB-25F connector for the parallel port on the IBM PC. Oops, that was already very commonly used for serial ports on computers and terminals. So they switched the serial port to a DB-25M ...


7

If you look inside the socket you will see that the contact is a fork with two prongs. They are angled to prevent interfering with each other. The important point is that the circular pin entry points are in the required pattern, 3 o'clock, half-past four, 6, half-past seven and nine o'clock.


5

Often called an SME tonearm headshell connector 4-pin. The mating part is either a replacement SME 3009 or 3012 tonearm or a female SME tonearm 4-pin socket. Here are a few examples of available parts: http://www.audiosilente.com/spare-parts-for-sme-new-sme-3009-connector-with-gold-plated-pins.html https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-5pcs-lot-Technics-tonearm-...


4

I know this is not the answer you're looking for, but I'd just splice the wire back together unless you have a reason to think the connector itself was part of the problem. Someone here may be able to tell you the general name of the connector, or maybe the exact style or even a part number, but you could spend a long time finding one, and possibly for more ...


4

The single most-important feature that your connector must have is that the ground pin makes connection first and breaks last. Sketch up your circuit and connectors and observe what happens if both of your power supply connections are made but the ground connection is open. There is a very good chance that both your low-voltage rail AND the signal ...


3

MIDI uses 5 pin 180 degree connector. It seems that the datasheet you linked matches this specification, 45 degrees between pins. The datasheet has only one 5-pin connector and it does match up.


3

To analyze what happens when you connect two powered circuit, without any special connector, try to imagine that you connect each wire individually in every possible order. Usually the worst case scenario is when you connect GND last. For example: assume that you connect the 24V first and then the 3.3V and try to imagine which path the currect would flow. ...


2

They appear to be some form of pins used in clincher connectors


2

Justme's answer is sufficient: There's pins that logically can't be split passively. And no, they are not optional; especially working E-DDC is a mandatory requirement for HDMI. Other than that: The signal lines aren't just "cables", they carry a very high-speed signal over impedance-controlled lines (typically, twisted pairs). If you built a splitter, ...


2

Yes, it is possible to make a wideband power splitter with matched input and output impedances, but the signal level is reduced by half, which greatly limits the length of cable that you'll be able to drive. Also, the physical layout is very critical for flat frequency response. There's more information here, but the basic idea is this: simulate this ...


2

Stereo jack connectors are often used in guitar/bass pedals to "enable" the pedal when a mono jack cable is connected, let me explain it with an image: The Sleeve is in contact with the ground part of the jack cable The Tip is in contact with the "tip" part of the jack, carrying the signal of the instrument The Ring is the extra tap necessary to "enable" ...


2

This looks like TE part 54489-5 pitch is .312" Contacts 53892-2 are seperate from the housing.


1

A closeup of the face of the cable, and dimensions of the port, would help. As would some info on the device it is plugging into. But I would guess it’s some sort of Amphenol connector. Maybe something similar to this: C01630G00680012. There are hundreds of such interconnects, so to get good results you’ll need to provide good information.


1

Are such cables able to be cut and connected (soldered) to the connectors pictured, and used without effect on their performance. Can't tell you, because we don't have a spec sheet to these connectors. USB2 is a (pseudo)differential bidirectional bus, and it relies on the cables being of defined impedance. If your connectors are designed to keep that ...


1

Now the probe vendor says that SMA cables/connectors damage the K-connector on rf-Probe. Probes are very fragile and could be damaged by a very small error in operating them. They should practically be treated as consumables, and if you're using them you should budget replacing them occasionally. So what I'd do is buy a set of probes with SMA connectors, ...


1

The "cleanest" way is a tin soldered heat-shrink sleeved connection. Other ways must guarantee a gas-tight connection between the wires contact surfaces, which can corrode over time. I have not tried these IDC crimps, but with the plastic threaded lock nut to seal the IDC crimp under pressure, I would support use of these but never any other crimp ...


1

The most common necessary part and that is the hot-insertion type connector which connects ground first. At the same time you must provide ESD transient protection. The requirements to avoid SCR-latchup are that the signal lines must never go outside the power rails by more than 0.2V. I doubt there will be any diode solution for this as transient ...


1

You can get "Dupont" style crimp connector housings and make up whatever kind of cable/harness you need. Male-male, male-female, a mix of the two, etc. Here's a picture of that kind of housing in some of the housings available. https://www.amazon.com/QLOUNI-Housing-Connector-Adaptor-Assortment/dp/B0774NMT1S?ref_=fsclp_pl_dp_1 If you go to Pololu.com and ...


1

yes That box specifies the tolerances on locations ABC shown as DIM "A",[B],[C]"C" ... don't ask where are D,E Do they still teach drafting in 1st yr Eng?


1

You can stack an undefined number of PCB like this one on top of each other, with traversing components: Use M3 hexagonal standoffs to keep the stack of PCB solidly together and at regular intervals. While nylon standoffs maintain isolation, you can use metallic standoffs to transmit power. Use heat shrink tubes to protect them against accidental short ...


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