7

run flex ribbons from the PCB to all 4 screw terminal block Why? You're only doing the modification once, so you're probably spending more time thinking about it than will take to assemble it :) The use of a ribbon from the PCB to the screw terminals is not the best idea, since ribbon cables have too small of a wire to reliably connect to screw terminals. ...


5

Your question is tagged "pcb design" - how about designing a PCB for it? :) I mean a normal rigid PCB, with edge milled to shape to fit the connector pitch. Something like this: One end will mate with the screw connector, and on the other half you can put whatever connector suits your purpose. For good contact, make sure to have copper on both ...


4

For test setups, I've used pin headers soldered into a bespoke PCB. If you can't find pin headers with the required pitch and length you might resort to using pieces of wire.


3

There are a couple of reasons, but I think one of the big ones is the speed of the various signals. Take, for example, USB 2.0 and USB 3.0: Source: https://theydiffer.com/difference-between-usb-2-0-and-3-0-cables/ USB 3 adds those extra five pins at the top, which are used in SuperSpeed mode (total bandwidth of 5 Gbps, which much faster than USB 2!) To ...


3

Don't think so. The forces, and the angles of the forces, are designed for medium-to-high contact pressure at a point, not what you want in a rotating contact. Also, the plating probably will not hold up. Contact lubricant, such as what is used in slip-ring connections and potentiometer wipers, will help. But before I'd commit to it, I'd rig up a ...


3

I resisted crimp technology for many years, preferring solder because it was more "professional", until I saw good evidence of the superior reliability of crimped connections. Nevertheless, if you have a strong preference for soldering, I suggest you search using the keyword "solder seal". You'll find a huge number of connectors ...


2

The material that most ICs are encapsulated in (the ubiquitous hard black plastic) is epoxy, which is a thermosetting polymer. This is opposed to most materials referred to as plastics, which are thermoplastic polymers. Thermoplastic polymers are made up of many separate polymer chains of various lengths (molecular weight) that don't actually have any bonds ...


2

Use a circuit like this the cap should be discharged on insertion which will pull down the input to the buffer creating a wake up signal. If the resistor will interfere with your measurement you can compensate for its presence in the software. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


2

I'm rather partial to Anderson's Powerpole connectors, which are highly durable connectors rated for thousands of mating cycles, are modular so you can assemble your own four-pole connector out of four single-pole ones, and are symmetric so there's no plug and socket, just a single connector that mates with another identical one. The contacts are crimped ...


2

If the pins are 0.025" square and on 0.100" centers, then AMP MTE (crimp) or MTA (IDC - insulation displacement) series. Molex and just about everybody has an itermateable part. Here is the AMP IDC part for #22 wire: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/3-641653-2/765829


2

While there are many possible sources of noise in your setup, you've found it's associated with "twisting of the cable" and have suggested it's related to the connector pin rotating. That's possible, but you should also consider "triboelectric noise" as well. This is a well-known source of noise in medical instrumentation cables carrying ...


2

It looks like a “Molex” 4-position connector. It seems to be part connector series “2695” (if you look up ‘Molex 2695’, you get plenty of results). If you go to Molex’s page directly for that part, they even provide a nice “Mates with/use with” section detailing the corresponding headers / crimps / pre-crimped leads). Here is a link for what I think you want:...


2

I suspect the answer has to do with the 5,000 cycle rating typical on those parts. Gold is soft and there is a lot of wiping action in the 3.5mm connector design. So you might find (too thin) gold flash in cheap jacks that will not retain the gold plating for many operations or thicker silver. Or thick and/or selective gold or gold alloy on better connectors....


1

Do you mean TPM? Looks like an Amphenol iPN FCI 20021321-00014D4LF is the mating connector 1.27mm pitch 2 x 7 with a key. Pinout is in the Mobo manual, 3 power supply rails available, but standby is not 5V.


1

If you have the possibility to drill holes into a metal frame of the equipment, then I would suggest you to use Harting HAN, D, DD, EEE, EE... series of connectors. In similar way as Kubahasn'tforgottenMonica suggested you to use wires with crimped ferules at the trminal block, and then to use pins that you crimp on the new connector end. You do insert ...


1

Molex "KK" series, I believe -- link


1

If you look closely at the datasheets, you'll find that the silver or gold plating applies to the pins, not the internal contacts. From your silver plated jack: The table in the upper right corner has pin numbers. The low left drawing shows the pin locations. The gold plated jack has a similar table and drawing. It's not the contacts that are plated, just ...


1

Many Non invasive current sensors come without a minijack The minijack is manufacturer specific. Use an amplifier made by the same manufacturer to convert the readout to something sensible (for example sparkfun sells this sensor, with this breakout board). In the case of current transformers the output is a voltage that can be amplified and monitored with an ...


1

With added picture, it is SM2 plug connector. From: This link From: this link From: this link but the SM2 plug pin is a bit to the top, it could fit. If it doesn't fit The NordicTrack using a non-standard SM2 plug. just change the plug entrirely.


1

since you don't care about every connector that might have existed, but only those you can actually buy, the kind-of-logical-ain't-it answer to your first question (list?) is: Go to one of the large electronic distributor's websites, click through to the connector listings, and select filters that describe your connector. Regarding your second question (ID ...


1

Neutrik Speak-On connector. Extremely reliable. These are available in 4-pin and 8-pin. Pull back on the lock latch and rotate about 1/8 turn counter-clockwise, then pull out. These are used in Professional Audio and have proven to be extremely reliable.


1

Use a ZIF socket for the capacitor connection and put a tactile button under the lever, or 90 degree tactile button at the end of the sled.


1

This is not for professional use cases, but I use pliers in the DIY situation. Either tiny little ones, or the really big 10" ones. I form the metal onto the wire just sufficiently enough to retain it. I then flux and solder it on with an appropriately sized iron. Whilst perhaps not approved for aeronautical/military use, and slow, the advantage is that ...


1

While looking at various JST connectors, I discovered that the JST NH series wire-to-board connector uses the same female contacts as the SM series, and is the same 2.5mm pitch. So while the NH header will not provide locking or orientation keying with the SM connector, it should fit well. With that said, I've also had no trouble plugging SM connectors onto ...


1

I am looking to protect a phoenix contact terminal which is exposed to the elements. This is the main problem. Phoenix connectors are not sealed, and are not designed for outdoor use. They are also spring-contact type, with medium-low contact force. Change to a connector type more suited to outdoor use. Dielectric grease itself is an insulator, which can ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible