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0

In India they are referred to as 'Dowell's cable crimping lugs' or 'Crimping type copper tubular cable terminal ends'. Cable crimping is carried out using special crimping tools with interchangeable hexagonal dies.


4

That's just two ring crimp terminals connected by a bolt. It's a terrible job. The left one is badly frayed and the right one is showing signs of burning. There is no easy way to insulate the connection properly. Figure 1. They are designed to be terminated on securely mounted studs - either direct to a chassis or onto a stud mounted on an insulated base. ...


3

These are generally referred to as "cable lugs". There are many different styles.


3

Looks like a Molex Micro-Fit. They should be on 3.0 mm centers.


4

Molex connector micro fit 3.0 family https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/molex/0430251000/WM1787-ND/252500 https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/molex/0430451000/WM1817-ND/252530


0

Does the connector pin material matter (tin vs. gold)? They need to be matched, if you are worried about 10mΩ's of resistance, then use gold for most digital electronics this won't matter. Even with 2A of switching current (which would be worst case) this would only be in the 10mV range which wouldn't be a problem for digital noise. If so, which should I ...


3

Looks like a 3-pin Molex 3191. It's available on both Digi-Key and Mouser.


1

Following on @user257228's answer +1, it's a A&C/Higo (Belgian company) "Z509FG P 00 A3 1000", and you can find a cable here for ~€5.


0

That's a big family. Connectors like the Mini-Fit could be classified as follow; Power Connectors 4.20 mm pitch up to 13A Rectangular: Single, Dual Row, other, Wire-to-Board, Wire-to-Wire, Cable-to-Cable Terminal Receptacle Plug , Cap , Housing (HSG) Header Locking, Double Lock, Triple Lock std temp, high temp Pitch: 3.3, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.6, 7.92, 9 mm ...


1

that sure looks like molex mini-fit JR https://www.digikey.co.nz/product-detail/en/molex/0015311032/WM2586-ND/2405493 https://www.digikey.co.nz/product-detail/en/molex/1726460313/WM20748-ND/5116928 contact pins and crimp tool sold separately.


1

The 'First' pin is not really a standardised thing for connectors like this. In my experience this would come down to your workplace’s general design conventions. For example, my workplace would pick based on the top down view of the PCB side Connector (All connectors of the same type would be mounted in the same orientation if possible). We would select the ...


2

Yes you can solder to the .016 DIA side of the connector no problem, this part is meant to be inserted into a Plated (Non-plated would work too) Through Hole PCB slot then soldered. I'm not sure what the Manufacturer solution would be other than a development breakout PCB?


0

Actually you solder the bottom part to a PCB, through hole. The upper pins have springs and they are meant to make a non permanent contact by touching contact pads.


0

For the symbol you can use the generic connector KiCAD e.g. Connector_Generic:Conn_02x24_Odd_Even and for the footprint you can use the footprint wizzard e.g. the one for SOIC.


3

Seems to be a Panasonic P5KS Series connector, likely the AXK5S24047YG, or a similar one from the series. A mating connector for this one would be an AXK6S24447YG or similar. See the datasheet and the obligatory Digikey link. Obligatory Digikey link I found this by searching Digikey, going to the Connectors, Interconnects category, then Rectangular ...


2

Yes that is normal, the sleeve connection of the jack most likely touches the tip and ring when plugging and unplugging. Yes, wiring large battery currents via a short-prone audio connector rated for 1A max current does seem like a bad idea. It is a completely wrong tool for the job. There are far more suitable connectors available that are designed for ...


3

As mentioned in the comments, those swaged turret pins. They are used to connect heavy guage wire to PCBs. The pin itself is "swaged" onto the PCB - it is rather like a rivet. The swaging provides mechanical strength. The pin can also be soldered to the PCB to ensure a good electrical connection. You can solder wires to the pins to connect things ...


3

Why are you immersing your assembly in oil? The only reason I can think of is that you intend to submerge it. So, I'll work on that assumption. First, any component that has an airspace is a problem. All those airspaces need to be filled with the fluid to balance pressure. Knowing this, and knowing how most electrolytics are made (they're layer stacks rolled ...


1

Dielectric constant of oil will be much higher than air, 2-3x more probably. If your circuit has high frequency tuned circuits or fast edges the additional capacitance and cross-talk might have some negative effects. That may affect some circuits. I would be particularly worried about the electrolytic capacitor seals. In fact Chemi-Con says: As @Hearth ...


2

The connector looks to be an SMT type similar (but maybe not identical) to this JST PH series part: The two brown squares are where the pads were that provided mechanical support for the connector. They are now gone (still attached to the connector since the glue that holds the copper on was weaker than the solder). The two pins you can see in my photo are ...


2

Your connector is still there. It's attached to the cable, but ripped off the PCB. That's why you've got copper red-brownisch rectangles at the bottom of your plastic piece, and missing on your PCB. Since it's ripped off, there's noting to solder it on to, so: Is it possible to solder directly to the motherboard? Not in general. You will have to figure out ...


1

Most of the connector I have found are only 2.5Amp, but for safety it should be derated a bit depending how much overall power is going through it.


0

Third one looks like a "Phoenix" style 3.81mm pitch connector (it's been slightly mangled by something). There are several manufacturers for these parts, you don't need to go with the ones from "Phoenix contact" To fit this connector the matrix board would have needed extra holes drilled or the pins would need to be bent, (pins 1 and 3 ...


3

They're called several different things: Magnetic Compression Contact Spring-loaded Magnetic Connector Magnetic Pogo Pin Connector Some examples I found are Adam Tech, CLE, or Hytepro.


-1

As illustrated in the data sheet, that is a 14-conductor 0.5 mm pitch flat flex cable Four of the 14 connections are the same signal, and two are unused, which accounts for the distortion of the visual pattern.


1

The EL wire system runs up to 120V, per IPC specs an 0.2mm or 8mil clearance should be used between traces and connector pads on the PCB with 120V (150V). In addition, 16mil should be used between coated insulation on wires. This means any connector could be used that has an 8mil clearance between the connectors. I like molex and JST connectors, if I am ...


1

Those terminals look like they are intended for soldering. There won't be any other type of connector. So wire, solder and soldering iron required.


1

They've provided a very poor drawing. 3 and 4 obviously disconnect when the jack is inserted. I suspect that 5 and 6 do as well but that contact is isolated from 2. That way it can be configured to work the same way as the tip contact by permanently connecting 2 to 5. When the jack is inserted 2 will be disconnected from 6. Alternatively you could leave 5 ...


2

The schematic is a bit confusing, or this is a multi-purpose connector. It is being called a stereo jack, yet pin call-outs are (1)=GND, (3)= TIP, (2)=RING, as if it was a telephone switch-board jack from many decades ago. In the days of mechanical switchboards this connect/disconnect feature allowed a used jack to light a small lamp. Each jack had its own ...


1

Here is your answer, sir, as regards the d531. I really hope this helps you.


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