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1 vote

Detecting 16 V AC with a GPIO

Thanks to the many helpful answers, I've learned a lot about the properties of this problem space. It seems like my main problem is that even if I found a "neutral" pole on the incoming AC, ...
Jonah's user avatar
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6 votes

Detecting 16 V AC with a GPIO

Several answers have mentioned optocouplers but they have not mentioned that there are AC input optocouplers that have back to back LEDs, for example this one. With these the phototransistor is ...
GodJihyo's user avatar
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3 votes

Detecting 16 V AC with a GPIO

Safest way is to use an optoisolator. Here is a method, showing the response time to a brief buzz of the bell. The 4 diodes can be a packaged bridge rectifier of just about any kind with an adequate ...
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Detecting 16 V AC with a GPIO

You fail to describe the nature of the AC signal, other than its amplitude, and even that is ambiguous. Is that RMS or peak voltage? This source has two terminals, and all we know about it is that one ...
Simon Fitch's user avatar
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2 votes

Detecting 16 V AC with a GPIO

Your circuit makes a very little sense. One solid/safe way is to use a standard optocoupler (like old 4N25X or VO615A, page4 ) A 10k series resistor and extra diode on input (in parallel, in opposite ...
Ale..chenski's user avatar
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1 vote

Force equal current between 2 pins

I could use this connector to pass 2*5A=10A Yeah, at room ambient air temperature, in other words: it's a fantasy. With a 5A/pin connector, you'll need at least 4 pins to share the 10A load. More ...
Kuba hasn't forgotten Monica's user avatar
4 votes

Force equal current between 2 pins

A little ballast resistance in each path will help share current equally between them. First look at the current imbalance without ballast: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using ...
Simon Fitch's user avatar
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2 votes

Force equal current between 2 pins

Made with microcap v12. Here is a circuit that "could" do what is needed. This works with "balanced" inputs. Do the same "work" for the negative pins of the board. It ...
Antonio51's user avatar
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1 vote

Programmable current-limit on mains

Sounds like you need an AC benchtop power supply. Something like this is what you need: https://www.chromausa.com/product/low-power-programmable-ac-source-61600/ ADDITION As a starting point (I'm not ...
MOSFET's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Protecting parallel loads

You simply need to have a power supply that can supply enough current for both devices operating at their max current consumption state. L1 requires at least 3A. L2 draws, at most, 2A. Take the sum of ...
MOSFET's user avatar
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