New answers tagged

1

0x29 is one of the available I2C addresses, it has nothing to do with the internal register addresses. The trailing h is just another way of designating a hex number (03h is the same as 0x03).


3

Those addresses are also in hex. 0x1F means the same as 1Fh. The XXh notation comes from Intel assembly syntax (source) Those addresses are used to identify a device register in the I2C transaction and are orthogonal to the address of the device on the bus. In particular, the device address is given on page 17, as a function of how a certain pin is ...


1

If you're designing for short pulses at moderate currents, then you're limited by the internal resistance of the battery stack over its lifetime and how much that drops the output voltage. At some point, you won't be able to effectively extract power from the battery. The archived datasheet for the similar Duracell MN21 battery gives a spec for a 0.1 s, 400 ...


3

How can I refer find such parameter(noise floor) from the datasheet of this accelerometer The noise floor is suggested in the parameters in table 1 under noise performance. For instance, in the X direction the noise is typically \$150\,\text{µg}/\sqrt{\text{Hz}}\$. To make this a clearer number for your application you need to state the bandwidth of ...


0

Firstly, schematic is just one small portion of the entire design process, the designers have a higher obligation of creating PCB designs that can actually make the ideas sell. Having said that, layout guidelines provided in datasheets, typically emphasize PCB layout considerations that would affect the performance of the application. Thermal and electrical ...


0

There is a reason why datasheet has multiple sections and that is to give as much as details about their part. First page covers about its key features. Also they have added application circuit which is nothing but kind of schematic using their PWM BUCK converter. Now, when you are using SMPS in your design, you should give great attention to the layout ...


1

In IEEE Std 952-1997 (Annex C) we find the answer to this. They have a fancy integral relation between Allan Variance (\$\sigma^{2}\$) and Power Spectral Density. If \$K\$ is the random walk coefficient of which you speak, they show that $$\sigma^{2}(\tau) = \frac{K^{2} \tau}{3}$$ So $$\sigma(\tau) = \frac{K \tau^{0.5}}{3^{0.5}}$$ The 0.5 power on \$\...


0

The term dipole comes from the fact, that such an antenna has two poles instead of one (monopole). A monopole looks like a simple pole standing on the ground, which is the reference (other pole) in that case. In a dipole, you have two poles (often pointing in different directions) referencing each other and no ground plane. Because of that, a dipole ...


0

For those who are interested, I got an answer from ST. The whole caluclation is in kB --> 1024Byte The flash memory has an information block, which contains the option bytes, so the calculation doesn't add up.


1

In most cases you can ignore this bias current as it is small enough. What you should be concerned about is voltage drop on regulator multiplied by load current. For example if you have 12V input, 5V output and expected load current 3A - the power dissipation on regulator equial P = (12-5)*3 = 7*3 = 21W Load will take P = 5V*3A = 15W (41.2%) with power ...


2

Notice the TI table has a "Board" column, specifying the part is tested when mounted on the JESD 51-5 high-K (high thermal conductivity) test board. This board provides conductive cooling through the lead frame, reducing the thermal resistance \$\theta_{JA}\$ compared to a test done with the part resting in still air or mounted on a board with minimal ...


10

This is the one: So typically 5 mA, maximum 8 mA How to quickly find that: I know it's a current so I look for any parameter specified in A (or mA, uA) in the UNIT column. Then I look at each and see if that could be the one. There will be a small increase with increasing load current, see the line under the red rectangle.


2

It's called input bias current and is on page 3 of the data sheet you linked.


5

In that particular data sheet, they seem to be calling it "Input Bias Current". A more common term is "Quiescent Current".


4

That just means the particular dimension is repeated that many times somewhere else on the drawing. For example: there are two gaps between pins. there are three pin bases there are only two pins that actually have a landing on the PCB


2

[example of Finite Element Modeling of thermal flows, at end of answer, for 10 micron mesh] The thermal timeconstant of 1 micron cube of silicon is 11.4 nanoseconds. The thermal timeconstant of 10 micron cube of silicon is 100X slower, at 1.14 microSeconds. The thermal timeconstant of 100 micron cube is another 100X slower, at 114 microseconds. Thus a ...


2

It means that it's on for \$300\mu \mathrm{s}\$, because anything more would fry the transistor. Then off for a Good Long While to let the transistor cool down.


11

Huh, it never occurred to me that anyone would interpret it as (a). I believe it is (b). 300us tells you the on-time, 1% implies the period (how frequent you can do it). This is because it says pulse DURATION, and a pulse exists only while it is on.


Top 50 recent answers are included