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7

As a communications engineer (and someone dealing with a lot more digital signal processing than is good), this slides ... weak to wrong. Advantages of Digital transmission We have to be very clear here: when we say "data", we typically mean things that are already digital to begin with. Now, of course, some kind of digital data has an analog ...


5

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: your power, assuming you are connecting the resistor between 600V and ground, is 818W. This means your average heat flux is about 58 W/cm2 (the peak flux will be higher, since the packaging and mounting areas of the resistor will not be producing heat), which is on par with a computer processor, but the total amount ...


4

The question and the slide deck are purple monkey dishwasher. ‘Digital’ transmission, if anything, is less efficient than analog in terms of spectrum usage for conveying an uncompressed baseband signal. Compare for example sending 3kHz audio vs. 64kbps digital for telephony. Clearly, the baseband audio is more efficient. On the other hand, careful encoding ...


3

This is a very interesting question, and I particularly enjoyed reading the comments and see the difference between an academic's attempt to "simplify" a networking concept versus the accurate interpretation of the slide's words by practitioners. So here is the situation - what the slide is trying to say, clearly not very successfully, is that when ...


1

Check with your local electric utility about the source variation. Although ±5% is common in North America, I have seen some utilities with wider tolerance on industrial services. This is not usually considered in the conductor sizing, because the motor nominal voltage is almost always lower than the supply nominal voltage by about 5%. As far as the drop ...


1

The length of the core increases its reluctance in a completely analogous way to how the length of a wire increases its resistance. The consequence of higher reluctance are (for the same crosssection and number of turns): lower inductance, higher saturation current


1

I strongly prefer to use large resistors that don't need heatsinking. I suggest you buy a resistor that is actually rated for the power you need to dissipate without a heatsink. This may even be cheaper than buying a heatsink for the resistor you have now. Here is one example: TE Passive Products part number TE1500B470RJ This is a 1500 Watt, 470 Ohm resistor,...


1

I am looking for the thermal resistance of the resistor but no luck I believe we can estimate a crude thermal resistance from the datasheet to get you started. The free air rating for this part is 120W. While the max temperature is listed as 200C, the derating chart show the part can sustain 100% full load up to about 130C. We can assume the thermal rise (...


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