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6

For 10 watts into 8 ohm speaker, you can do this system design P = Vrms * Vrms / Rload 10 watts = V * V / 8 10 * 8 = V * V thus Vrms_out ~~ 9 volts RMS, or 2.828 * 9 peakPead You will need headroom. So have at least 40 volts VDD. Now for the gain: The topology of common_emitter amplifier, into a resistive load, has maximum voltage gain of VDD / 0.026; ...


4

Yes it does matter. Your two sections are rather oddly matched, as Tony says. I presume you know you'll have quite a bit of passband ripple, and it's the right decision for your application. If the high Q section is first, then high amplitude signals around the pole frequency will be amplified by the Q, and cause the amplifier to clip, i.e. become very non-...


3

All other things being equal, digital signals only need to resolve two levels: a valid ‘0’ or ‘1’. The receiving end sets these thresholds and snaps to one of the valid levels, and so can be designed to reject a considerable amount of noise on the line. Analog signals are continuous. The entire range of the signal swing contains information. Any added noise ...


3

It all depends on the application that you are talking about, but generally the reason is because a digital circuit is either on or off. So lets say that in order to measure a digital high, the minimum threshold may be around 2-2.7v for 5v logic. And to register a low, it may only need to be as low as 0.8v. So any small amount of noise is generally not going ...


3

Yes, use 4 wires in one strand and then wind the bobbin.


3

It means take 4 24SWG wire and then make them parrelel connection and then do 47 turns. The wire should be made of 4 strand first, then only it should be wound.


2

Yes - determine the total length of wire you will need (plus some extra) then fold it back on itself four times for the secondary to create a bunch of 4 wires in parallel then wind that round the bobbin/core 47 times. For the primary fold it onto itself to create a bunch pf 32 wires and wind 6 turns. Using multiple wires rather than one thick wire gives ...


2

Yes, it means take 4 strands of 24 SWG, connect them in parallel (or fold as Kevin suggested) and wind the bunch around the bobbin/core to make up the secondary. The parallel strands vs. a single strand reduce the AC resistance (due to skin effect) and therefore the losses.


2

For what it's worth, not an answer but more detail than a comment., If there is a signal where Q is highest, and any chance of saturation, it would be better last, as stage 1 attenuates at Qmax(f). But in linear use , they are interchangeable as there are no loading effects between stages.


2

Overview block diagram of single supply class AB amplifier. This is representative of a 4W into 8R amplifier which I built and so the shown 24V supply would be too low for your requirements.


2

but I don't know where to start Every design process starts with listing the requirements. It appears that you've listed those, so that's a start. A Class-AB audio amplifier involves three stages: Input stage Voltage Amplification Stage Output stage. And the design of each stage requires: Basic circuit theory, Transistor-based amplifier design, Filter ...


1

Each input goes to a edge detector which outputs a pulse. It needs to detect either edge. Like this one: dual edge detector Those outputs are then ORed together (4 input OR gate) to a D-Flop clock input. Connect \$\overline{Q}\$ output to input \$D\$


1

An analog circuit is not intrinsically more susceptible to noise than a digital circuit, because a digital circuit is made up of analog devices. Noise is a signal that interferes with the signal of interest. The difference in analog circuits and digital circuits is the kind of noise that can be safely tolerated. In a digital circuit, the important parameter ...


1

Is it possible to integrate audio data to the same USB bus from EZ USB CX3 ? yes. USB hubs, and a separate USB sound card. 10€. If with "audio" you mean playback: Literally the first page of the CX3 datasheet: I2S master (transmitter only) at sampling frequencies of 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 96 kHz, and 192 kHz (if in doubt, ...


1

Rigid-flex boards are still so outrageously expensive that vendors should be able to work with you to get a mutually acceptable solution. Last time I did one, I used Altium which has specific features for rigid-flex but I think you could do it simply by laying out a multilayer board with internal (typically) layers designated as FPC. You could demarcate the ...


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