New answers tagged

1

The YouTube video linked in the question provides a reasonable, but very basic explanation that avoids most of the math. More complex squirrel-cage rotor designs provide starting torque that is adequate for most purposes. Therefore slip-ring motors are not used very much. Also electronic power inverters called variable-frequency drives (VFDs) are used to ...


0

The induction motors will present a lagging power factor. If the motors are oversized, the lagging power factor will be greater. The power factor of wound-field synchronous motors can be adjusted to be leading or lagging. If the local installation has both induction and synchronous motors, the synchronous motors can be adjusted for leading power factor to ...


0

If that's a stator, where are the slots? Where does the rotor go? Methinks that is the ROTOR, and I have never heard of the laminations of a rotor (or stator for that matter) held together by glue or epoxy, they are either welded or bolted. this entire question seems made up.


0

What is the difference between applied voltage and induced voltage at primary side of transformer specifically? The applied voltage of a transformer primary is the voltage you would measure across the primary terminals. The induced voltage is the electromotive force induced by the changing magnetic flux in the core of the transformer. The applied voltage is ...


2

Volts per turn is the voltage across a single turn of a conductor looped around an area that encloses a time-varying flux. That area is the cross-sectional area of your core. At least, that's a good approximation in a high permeability cored inductor or transformer. Going round once gives you volts per turn. Going round N times gives you N times that voltage,...


Top 50 recent answers are included