24

This is like asking "how bright is a red light?". It's as bright as it is. You can make a bright red light or a dim red light. As another answer points out, the energy per photon of an electromagnetic signal depends on the frequency of the signal. But you can make a brighter or dimmer (higher or lower power) source at any frequency by emitting more or fewer ...


7

Magnetic lines of flux follow a convention and that convention is that lines of flux (leaving the "core") flow from a north pole to a south pole (through the air): -


3

Flux lines leaving both are labeled North. The stator is the ring structure, hollow in the middle to accept the rotor.


3

Normally an insulated wire is used to make an electromagnet. The strength of electromagnet using insulated wire will be more than the one made with non insulated wire considering the batter size, wire thickness, number of turns, and the core remains the same. The reason is if the wire is non insulated then the electron may move straight through the core (...


3

Apart from the fact that you are probably misusing the length dimension of the ferrite, you are also miscalculating flux density quite badly (See further below). The length dimension for a ferrite core is the closed loop length that the magnetic field travels along and, for an electromagnet, it has to include the air gap. Any small amount of air gap will ...


2

You might need to make a distinction between 'power' PWM, and 'signal' PWM. To command a typical servo, we use a PWM signal which has a high pulse of 1mS full left, 1.5mS centre, 2mS full right, which most servoes will handle being repeated at somewhere between 20Hz and 100Hz. These times are interpretted by the control electronics as a position, and the ...


2

Most small servos don't use magnetic fields for position sensing, they use potentiometers. Here's a good beginner's level explanation in text with a video link. They all seem to have the same basic components – a potentiometer hooked to a voltage regulator and one shot generator, which converts position of the armature to a PWM pulse. This PWM pulse is ...


2

For this I can increase the number of turn on the primary side N1. Nevertheless I will increase the magnetic excitation H which is equal with some appoximation to H = N1*I1/l. It will then saturated even "higher" my core. That would be entirely true if the magnetization current remained the same but, it doesn’t... Increasing the number of primary turns ...


1

Take transformer design one step at a time. Do you need an air gap or not? It depends what type of transformer you want. Do you want a normal, forward, power transformer, with output voltage always a turns ratio of the input voltage? Or do you want a flyback transformer, which stores energy, only to release it into the load at a voltage defined by the load ...


1

It's known, but FREAKIN' HARD TO CALCULATE. So, in any textbooks, it's just that nobody uses it as homework problems. It's "known," but not in low-level introductory materials. You'll find the same situation with any simple physics with difficult math: supposedly "unknown," until you personally make the discovery, and start yer playin' widdit. You need ...


1

The only reason insulated wires are used is to stop the turns shorting out if they touch each other. Bear in mind that field strength is proportion to the current and to the number of turns. So if you want small currents you increase the number of turns.


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