7

Most are marketing BS, intelligent, smart, innovative, advanced, mean absolutely nothing. Some of the more precise things might mean at least a bit of what they intend to convey, but how well they execute that is another matter. Adaptive - it should self adjust to something or other. ADSL modems test the quality of the line before deciding on a speed, ...


5

Simply: No, you can not. A USB interface is a high speed serial interface with strict impedance rules. The tracks have to be routed side-by side having an impedance close to 90 ohm. You can not make a tap and route that somewhere else or connect other components to one (or both) of them. So you have to find a different solution.


4

Yes you can add more ram, but it won't be quicker as you will only be able to add ram with a serial interface which is slow (because the data and address bytes are sent serially). The STM32f1's don't have parallel hardware interface (FMSC), I am not sure the F3's do but some of the F4's do and F7's and H7's series. It's better to find a dev board with an ...


3

From this website, the answer is ARMv6TEJ: ~ $ cat /proc/cpuinfo Processor : ARMv6-compatible processor rev 5 (v6l) BogoMIPS : 398.13 Features : swp half thumb fastmult edsp java CPU implementer : 0x41 CPU architecture: 6TEJ CPU variant : 0x1 CPU part : 0xb36 CPU revision : 5 Hardware : Broadcom BCM5892 Chip ...


3

C programs need some pre requisites for stack, global variables and so on.... Have a look here for more details. In assembler you had to do these things on your own, because you have the full control of the controller.


3

When writing an ISR in C, you should never use return unless you know what you are doing. Most MCUs keep different instructions for "return from subroutine" and "return from interrupt". If your compiler translates return to return from subroutine, you would get exactly the kind of bug you describe. Why do you write return in the first place - it's a void ...


2

The problem was found in memory addressing. Correct memory addresses are: CMD: 0x60000000 DATA: 0x60020000


2

In your while loop, you forgot your squiggly brackets. It should be: while(1) { if( (TIMER0_RIS_R & 0x00000001) == 1) //Checking if timer has finished counting. { TIMER0_ICR_R |= (1<<0); //Clearing the finished timing bit in TIMER0_RIS_R. GPIO_PORTF_DATA_R ^= (1U &...


1

If you are running on a Linux system, you can use 'cat /proc/cpuinfo' to get some more details about the CPU. Your feature details set may be listed there.


1

The idle voltage levels on CANH and CANL are standardized at 2.5V. If you have anything else, it is broken and shouldn't be used. There is nothing called "3.3V CAN" or "5V CAN". This assuming that you even have CAN, meaning that each node has a CAN controller and a CAN transceiver. The controller is built-in inside a MCU on all modern systems, whereas the ...


1

One important reason to write something in assembly is to have control over those kinds of low level details. Nevertheless you do still have to declare regions for stack, heap, constants and other types of non-program data when you create an assembly program. But it’s up to you as the assembly programmer to manage them yourself.


1

You have the right idea, my Mecrisp-Across documentation site has some info on installing Mecrisp-Stellaris to the Tiva that may help: https://mecrisp-across-folkdoc.sourceforge.io/installing.html#installing


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