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2

Yes, those numbers look pretty good — payload throughput that's ~90% of the raw wire speed is quite typical for Ethernet. The other 10% is consumed by Ethernet and TCP/UDP/IP overhead.


1

You can just chop a cable in half, carefully wire it to a breakout (keep the exposed wire straight and short as possible), and put the scope probes across either the TX or RX pair depending on which direction you want to look at. I have done this myself to debug an autonegotiation problem, which fortunately is done with lower speed data.


5

An oscilloscope is the wrong tool to view ethernet data. Unless you expect signal integrity problems. Then you need the scope. The best tool for the job is a switch with port mirror and a spare network card on a PC to run pcap with Wireshark. You can also use a ethernet hub, but you can't buy those anymore. So unless you have from the 90's, you're better ...


0

PHY chip output stages vary; some have only current sink on/off output, some have multiple current levels. Different output stages may require different transformer setup, but typically transformer center tap is connected to a bias supply, but some output stages can work without. As the output stage uses current sinks, it means that it is high impedance ...


0

Assuming differential lines, the levels are simply strong outputs pulling the wires apart, in either polarity. Or, like CAN, providing no drive at all, for that 3rd level. problems? reflections.


0

surge arrester basically only MOV which the characteristics slower to react such high spike of potential energy created by vacuuming a carpet. carpet it self discharge over 4KV not sure how much it can get if contacting with vacuum cleaner.. it will be overkill by your Ethernet cable shield. the discharge highly likely to jump on your Ethernet cable since ...


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Confirmed with vendor that this will work as long as the signals from each port are connected properly to a separate PHY and that each PHY provides proper impedance termination. IEEE802.3 is a point to point standard. As such you would need 1 PHY per each ICM.


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Regarding PoE - It is not related to SPI vs MII choice. You can design your board to have a DC jack that bypasses the PoE regulator. Check the PoE reference designs from Aanalog Devices or TI for examples. Make sure your Ethernet connector and magnetics support PoE.


0

If you're talking PCIe, then any PCIe NIC chip should work. Not sure if you can get quad port chips, or if you would need two dual port chips. But it should be doable. Switch chips are also an option, but bear in mind that a switch chip does not send all traffic through to the SoC, the SoC is simply another port on the switch. You can set up VLANs and the ...


2

No, this is not a valid test case. A valid test case would be with both jacks connected to a router or switch. You should do high data rate transmission from both ports (somehow), since when your device is transmitting over Ethernet, that is the worst case scenario. Please also note that emissions on the Ethernet cable may arise from any circuitry on the ...


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