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41

You are confusing certification and emissions requirements. Only intentional radiators need to be certified. From your description, your device is not a intentional radiator. However, you are still obligated to ensure it does not radiate excessively. The limits are defined in part 15 of the FCC rules. How you determine for yourself and ensure that the ...


35

To Start You're going to want some things if you can get them. First would be a spectrum analyzer with quazi-peak averaging, if you can't beg borrow or steal one of those, the test lab will have one. I suppose you could try to use your scope and FFT mode but that's nowhere near as good. Then if you can buy your self a EMI sniffer probe set, mine is the 100C ...


25

I know this is an older post, but after reading it I was a little troubled to see so much miss-information and ignorance in the comments that I had to chime in. My background? Over 20 years in regulatory compliance and testing. I am also a Telecommunication Certification Body for FCC certification in the United States. I'll take your points one by one; 1) ...


14

FCC Title 47, Part 15 section 5.b should clarify this for you: (b) Operation of an intentional, unintentional, or incidental radiator is subject to the conditions ... that interference must be accepted that may be caused by the operation of an authorized radio station, by another intentional or unintentional radiator, by industrial, scientific and ...


13

There are two types of testing that must generally be done on a new electronic product, safety and emissions testing. In addition, if you have a medical product, then there are additional standards you must follow. In the US, UL (Underwriters Laboratories, a private testing laboratory) requires third party safety testing to be performed before a UL mark ...


12

Your assumptions are close :D. It doesn't turn on the wifi unless you go through the menu to enable wifi and add the ap settings and all. Based on the FCC ID AZDK30306 (AZD is the Grantee Code, K30306 is the model), searching on The FCC ID page, it's 3.3v (not 5v tolerant), no internal regulator. Peak 0.6A. Based on USB. Full 802.11b/g support. Pins from ...


11

All intentional radiators must be certified to the FCC regulations. Since you said "transceiver", it implies this device is in part a transmitter. Selling a intentional radiator, such as your device, without FCC certification in the United States is a federal offense. All your units can be confiscated, you can be fined, and in some cases worse punishments ...


11

The RC oscillator of the ATtiny26L can be programmed to run at 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, or 8.0MHz directly without running through a prescaler. Its PLL will still perform a 64x though, so make sure it is disabled if the device must be eligible for the exemption.


9

The FCC does regulate induction heaters. The regulations mainly are concerned with interference with other users in the frequency spectrum. The main intent of an induction heater is to produce a magnetic field, not an electomagnetic field (radio wave). Propagation of magnetic field and electromagnetic fields are a little different, and I will leave that ...


9

The only way I know to avoid the full FCC certification is to get a module that has an antenna already attached, whether an antenna connector, chip antenna or PCB trace. For example this Bluetooth module which I have used in the past comes with a chip antenna, in the upper left corner: (I know you are using a GSM, but the same principal applies.) Note the ...


8

Aaah yes, standing at the bottom of a steep learning curve. Best place to start is with one of the excellent books for system level EMI/RFI - Henry Ott is a known good reference. Howard Johnson has an excellent web series too. Test chamber time is expensive, but you can learn a lot in there. There are things you can do ahead of time to ensure that you've ...


8

Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 15 (47 CFR 15) of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and regulations regarding unlicensed transmissions. Nearly every electronics devices sold inside the United States radiates unintentional emissions, and must be reviewed to comply with Part 15 before it can be advertised or sold in the US market. The ...


7

Judging by this, in the "FCC Test Procedure" chapter, most likely to ensure that the SSD does not emit any kind of electromagnetic radiation that could harm or be detrimental to the computer's operation. Super Talent’s SSDs were tested by an independent testing laboratory for Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification. This is an official ...


7

I don't know about CE, but you legally need FCC approval to sell a product in the US if it is a intentional radiator. If not, it still has to meet part 15 requirements, but it is up to you how you comply and there is no mandatory testing. You can just throw a unintentional radiator out there (in the US) without testing, but if there is ever a complaint or ...


7

The entity buying the "product" is going to be the importer of record and, in the end, responsible for ensuring that their laws and regulations are met (and is also taking a risk that the product may be seized and not be allowed to cross their borders). It's (usually) not illegal under local laws for, say, a North American to sell a non-conforming product, ...


7

Here's my understanding. Since it is a radio module, then it is definitely an intentional radiator and if they claim it has been FCC-certified it should have an FCC ID on each module. You should contact the manufacturer and ask why it's not there. If you incorporate the module into your own product, and the module already has an antenna (e.g. a "chip" ...


7

Search the FCC database by their stated FCC ID code: http://transition.fcc.gov/oet/ea/fccid/ The first 3 or 5 characters is the Grantee Code (assigned to a company). There isn't an equivalent for CE.


6

Many facilities will offer pre-compliance testing, the goal of which is to root out problems in design in a slightly less formal process that is often less expensive per hour than full compliance testing. You'll run some tests, take some measurements, then with the engineers at the facility discuss ways that your circuitry could be improved if it does not ...


5

A antenna by itself does not radiate, so can't be certified. The entire unit of a intential radiator, including the antenna, absolutely needs to have FCC certification if you want to legally sell it in the United States. If this antenna is connected to a receiver-only device that never intentionally radiates, then certification is not required. However, ...


5

From this document: One big advantage for the short whip is that it can be a trace on a PCB, with a chip inductor used to tune out the capacitive reactance of the antenna. If the trace runs parallel to ground, the real part of the antenna impedance will be approximately 10 ohms. In a hand-held unit, the impedance will be raised substantially ...


5

You can make single board products with fast electronics pass CE/FCC in plastic or no housing. It is easier if you: keep all cables attached in one end only use fewer cables specify a specific simple application for the FCC/CE test don't have things that stick off the board (display, large connectors etc.) make a very low impedance power distribution ...


5

One indication would be that if the customer had not paid for it, it would still be under determination. The FCC has big enforcement teeth, and fighting them could eat up a lot of money if they think you're playing fast and loose. Even if you win, the process will ensure you lose.


5

In the United States the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) Part 15 regulates unlicensed transmissions. It doesn't matter whether you are using a "module", it is the unlicensed use of any transmission. The FCC doesn't care HOW you comply with the regulations. If a device complies with regulations without using a shield, so much the better. ...


5

Why is that noone uses other frequencies? The radio spectrum is crammed full of users, some licensed, some military and there are a few spaces left over that unlicensed users are permitted to use. Here's what the US looks like: - If you want a more detailed view type in the link shown on the picture. You can also find details on line, for each specific ...


5

Modules are typically certified with the assumption that they are the only intentionally radiating device. Some module datasheets will make this known with statements like: This transmitter must not be co-located or operating in conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter. Note, it says with any other antenna or transmitter. So, even if you ...


4

Certain categories of products must have a CE mark to be sold in the EU. One of my clients manufactures medical devices, which are of the categories specifically mentioned, so they definitely required a CE mark (and have one). However another category is Electromagnetic Compatibility. In Annex 6 of the "Guide to the implementation of directives based on ...


4

"Interference" in this context applies to one, radiated r-f signal affecting the -reception- of another radiated r-f signal. The interference is not produced within the interfering transmit system, but as a result of the radiated field intensity it produces at the receive location(s) of other transmitted signals. Transmit systems whose operators and ...


4

Tye following may be useful. Most are 2.4 GHz focused but should provide some useful ideas. TI 2.4 GHz PCB Antenna - AN 043 - 2.4 GHz but should have significant value. Compact Integrated antennas - Freescale AN 2731 - significant relevance A few zillion PCB antennas - all images linked to webpages Commercial products - but some good idea starters ...


4

If you've got a 25 MHz Square wave oscillator, then it's not surprising to see harmonics up to the 7th. If it's a sine wave oscillator, I suspect your Ethernet Phy is doing some squaring up.


4

Definitely DO NOT dismember the AC adaptor and imbed it in your device. Use a UL-approved wall-wart power supply (or an iDevice power block) as-is to provide power to your Pi, and provide power to the second device from the Pi box. If you run 120VAC into your box, you will need regulatory approvals. The reason so many things use external power supplies ...


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