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1

The configuration of the amplifier as shown in the question is not quite right, as differential amplifiers will yield better results. If the load doesn't mind a small voltage bump from the sense resistor, low side configurations are preferable. Either way, use one of these configurations: Source: https://www.mouser.in/new/Texas-Instruments/ti-vishay-current-...


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simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab This is Common Emitter design, H bias with negative feedback design, not perfect for every variation on Rin,Rout, gain and V+ , but one that closer matches what you were trying to do with up to 50x more voltage gain. ( assuming you meant to show Rc on V+ but didn't know how to use editor.) ...


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I don't know if anything else is wrong, but always bypass your power pins. And I mean always, on everything. In this case it means a 100nF cap between pins 6 and 4 of each chip, placed as close to the chip and with the shortest leads that are practical. You should also have some bulk bypass -- I'd go with a 100uF electrolytic cap from +V to ground, just ...


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It`s very simple: The feedback factor is nothing else than a frequency-dependent voltage divider Z2/(Z1+Z2) with Z1 as a series combination and Z2 as a parallel combination of the given impedances (R resp. 1/wC). This passive part forms the most simple form of an RC-bandpass.


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I understand your question to be "how do I set a maximum allowable voltage on the output". In a class D, the maximum output voltage is determined by the voltage on the output stage. To ensure the output voltage never exceeds 35Vrms, set the voltage of the output stage to a maximum of 99V. That way, regardless of the input signal the output switching ...


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Here is my solution: 1.) Apply a test voltage Vin between both output nodes. This voltage causes two currents - one current i1 directly into the amplifier (through ro) and another current through the feedback network producing a voltage (Vn=Vin*beta) at the opamp input. Of course, the "actual" input signal Vi is set to zero! 2.) The input voltage Vn will ...


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