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1

You left off how rapidly you want the thing to switch. I'll assume that you want to switch in around 1% of the total PWM time (so, \$20\mu\mathrm{s}\$) -- adjust my answers up and down based on what you really want. With 5v powering the arduino, and a 490Hz PWM signal, what will the required current? That transistor has a maximum total gate charge of ...


2

You should first put a gate stopper resistor, \$R_G\$, to limit the current drawn from the MCU's pin when turning the MOSFET on (remember that there is a large capacitor, \$C_{iss}\$, at MOSFET's gate, and it may draw a large current even for a short time when driven from a low-resistance source). This resistor and the input capacitance of the MOSFET also ...


1

The gate capacitance is around 10nF, so if you add a 500 ohm resistor (limiting the pin current to 10mA), the switching time will be around 10-15us, which should be fine for your application. This mosfet is pretty over-spec for what you want (it can switch hundreds of amps), so maybe you could choose a less powerful transistor with a lower gate capacitance.


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When it comes down to selecting quality components, I am not sure if looking for the lowest price as underlined in your post is a sound argument. Power electronics is a harsh environment for components and if you want to build rugged systems, look for IC vendors having rigorous qualifying processes with min and maxes over the whole temperature range in their ...


0

The bar over LIN means that it is 'inverted'. Logical low on LIN will saturate the gate of your low side mosfet. This is likely to allow you to achieve complementary PWM output with only one pin. The full truth table is provided in the diagram below, from the datasheet. It is fine to use BJT's to drive the gate of a low side n-channel MOSFET, or the gate ...


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On the old part, the low side driver was noninverting. On the new part, the low side driver inverts, meaning that when it used to turn the FET on, it's now turning it off, and vice versa. You could go into the Arduino code and invert the output polarity.


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I can’t figure out what the circuit should do, but I know what it actually does. Here I see one input and two outputs if I consider the LEDs to be that. Either one is lit or the other. He does this well. What would be the goal? SW OFF: SW ON:


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