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0

The formula seems to calculate speed regulation defined as the speed change due to load torque change. That will be proportional to the change in voltage drop across the armature resistance. What you appear to be trying to calculate is the generator field excitation required to produce the armature voltage from the generator that the motor requires for the ...


0

Transmitters can be capacitively coupled to a power transmission line, but this may not even be necessary in your case. In the short distances you are stating, a completely wireless solution should suffice, given there is a power source at the remote generator. However, it seems to me in my initial thoughts, that a load sensing circuit could be installed ...


4

I think that you are simply looking for good old attenuators. They are easily available: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/connectors/rf-coaxial-connectors/rf-attenuators/ You can connect them together to get a signal as weak as you want.


0

A car alternator produces a DC output so you don’t need a bridge rectifier. The one you have linked is for a Chevy. Single wire is usually positive and metal chassis of alternator negative.


6

You can use any generator and simple voltage divider made using two resistors with values what are needed to provide proper divide ratio and output resistance.


20

At relatively low frequencies you can simply divide down the voltage from an ordinary function generator. Very accurate, cheap and fairly low output impedance is easy. For example a 100K resistor and a 10 ohm will give you 10uV from 100mV function generator output with 10 ohm source impedance. You can use two stages to get even lower, but below 100nV or ...


1

The 0-120-240° three phase system is used because it utilizes the three wires as good as DC would. 100% of possible current and 100% of possible voltage without overloading either. A single-phase AC system in contrast only has an utilisation of 70% because of the zero crossings. You cannot do better than 100%. That's why more phases are pointless. There ...


1

If it's a hypothetical generator, then if you put no load on the generator, it will take no effort to spin. Adding more windings then makes no difference. The voltage output also makes no difference, as there is no current being drawn. Add an electrical load to the generator, and the mechanical load on whatever is driving increases by the same amount. ...


3

Let's assume I have a 3-phase generator and need X amount of mechanical power in order to get 200 Volts Phase-Neutral. You are confusing the relationship between power and voltage. For a given winding arrangement the voltage will depend on the speed. The mechanical power input required when unloaded will be that only to overcome the mechanical resistance. ...


0

Use a transformer with a single turn shorted secondary. I'd consider getting an RM12 pot core somewhat like this: - And, winding 100 primary turns that can be driven from an amplifier that can produce 1 or 2 amp RMS, possibly an audio amplifier driven by your signal generator. The secondary (single turn) should be made of copper bar (or braid) and bent ...


0

The simplest solution will be to resonate your magnetic coil with a capacitor, to be resonant at about 20kHz, then drive it from an amplifier at resonance. The amplifier will only need to supply sufficient power to make up for losses in the LC circuit. These will principally be resistive losses in the coil and in the capacitor's ESR. Finding a capacitor ...


1

You can short circuit the input to ground, this gives you a straight line at 0 V. You can position this with the offset knob at a position you like - this will be your zero volt position. Now you can switch the input from ground to a DC coupled input. You will see your waveform, the AC as well as the DC. The DC content is the offset of the middle of your ...


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