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5

I have seen adapters that are exactly what you want. On the side that plugs into the wall they have one conductive prong for the earth connection and two plastic dummy prongs to fit the live and neutral. On the other side they present the earth connection either as a single banana socket or a screw terminal. So they do exist, but I'm not going to try to ...


3

You have two common options: 1) A plug that is some variation on the left image. They come in many different designs and price points. Be aware that they may also have resistors on some/all of the sockets which could potentially make some unsuitable for your purposes. 2) Use/install a wall plate with an exposed ground screw as shown on the right. You can ...


3

The point of the battery protection IC is to disconnect the battery when it's over-discharged. It does that in your schematic by disconnecting the BATT- terminal from the rest of the circuit using those MOSFETs as a switch. An alternative way of doing it would be to disconnect the BATT+ terminal from the rest of the circuit. But it is usually easier to ...


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You could but it is not a surefire technique since you could trigger an GFCI device (Ground Fault Circuit Interruptor). Moreover this could be really UNSAFE. The fact is that whatever current you draw from the live wire it ends up to earth ground through the protective conductor (earth ground wiring system - green/yellow conductor). This adds up to ...


2

Grounding the dc negative bus is a really bad idea. If your substation is solidly grounded (as opposed to HRT, or ungrounded), you’ll probably just hear a loud bang at some point. If not, the bang may be in a seemingly unrelated piece of electrical equipment fed from the same sub. Look at your rectifier stage at the front end of the drive and envision ...


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You don't need a separate trace, but consider how the current will travel between the GND pin of the capacitor and the GND pin of the IC. When the current doesn't have to travel as far, the impedance (most importantly the inductance) will be smaller, which is exactly what you want for a bypass capacitor. The same goes for VCC: Arrange the PCB layout so ...


2

You won't need vias to connect your IC grounds to a ground plane. You are using through hole parts. The holes are plated, and basically they are oversized vias. Any pin that connects to ground would automatically be connected to the ground plane - provided that you manage to define the copper area as a ground plane. As for creating a ground plane in ...


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No, this will not cause a problem. The high-level input voltage to U3 will be about 0.1V below the power supply voltage of U3. That input voltage is still well within the voltage range that will be recognized as a logic '1' by U3, and the slightly lower voltage will not damage U3. The only possible disadvantage to this arrangement is that the power supply ...


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you're on the right track with safely making use of the ground pin from a standard outlet. I just did the same search within the last couple months and was surprised at how few options there are -- but keep searching and you will find them. I was also surprised at how quickly you can empty your bank account for such a simple device. Follow the advice from ...


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it's bugging me because I'm essentially connecting Vin- and Vout- on the converter and if that was okay then why would they even have put Vout- on there? You probably have an isolated converter. If you need to maintain galvanic isolation between the input and output (for example, for user safety), then you would not connect VIN- and VOUT-. If you don't ...


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The first question you need to ask is what sort of ground do you want and why? If you want the ground purely for electrostatic discharge protection then ESD grounding equipment is appropriate. ESD grounding equipment contains large resistors to prevent it from passing large currents. On the other hand if you want the ground for safety* or EMC reasons the ...


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Circuit grounding is simple at the face of it but gets involved when you look at details. the symbol is the most generic and "common" one. The other one is just a variant of it. IEEE defines the latter as "signal ground" but in practise there are no fixed meanings, different companies and individual designers may use one or the other. What these are ...


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