3

These parts from VMI are typical of what is available, assuming we are talking about low power dissipation: https://www.voltagemultipliers.com/products/diodes/axial-lead-glass-body-diodes/ At 5 kV reverse voltage, it is not possible to avoid a few volts of forward drop when using semiconductor diodes. If you are interested in very low frequencies, then it ...


3

You're feeding a 1nF capacitor with a 50pF capacitor. That's a 200:1 ratio, which means that the very first thing you're doing is effectively shorting out your signal. If you're measuring 150mV on the oscilloscope with that 1nF cap in-circuit, then if you take it out your signal should be HUGE. If you're not, then you need a preamp circuit that'll present ...


2

... just like 2 equal valued resistors in series ... No. Buck converters have switching transistors. Figure 1. Image source: Toshiba Semicon Storage. Since your two buck converters will switch asynchronously you can be guaranteed that at various times one transistor will be on and the other off. You will not get even division of voltage across the two ...


2

Usually: no. Buck converters are usually not isolated, i.e. the output shares a potential with the input. Most often, that's ground. Therefore, "stacking" would just short the output of the lower one to ground. "Stacking" on the input simply makes no sense, these are not resistors that share the voltage drop. So that can't work out at all....


2

You're not showing the stray capacitance in parallel with R310, R318 and R319. In a voltage divider, the C is often proportional to the R so no harm done, but in the filter, at 36 kHz, it could easily dominate the 1 M resistor. Each 4 pF of stray capacitance there has an impedance of about 1 Mohm, so if the nodes HV2A and HV2B are fairly bulky this could ...


2

Arcing probably not, due to 10M Source impedance. But the switch rating is an issue. If it is a relay switch, it might actually still hold even at 500 V (again because no arcing due to 10 M source impedance). If it is a MOSFET switch, it might conduct in "avalanche" mode, but probably not get destroyed due to the small current. Edit: as the bottom ...


2

Tesla coils work off of resonance between the primary and secondary circuits. The resonant frequency of the primary tank circuit is set by the primary inductor and capacitor and is designed to match the resonant frequency of the secondary. In your case, you have an existing driver circuit which may or may not match the resonant frequency of your coil. If ...


1

You have enough signal , 150 mV hopefully on a 10M/ 3pF probe and you are expecting 250mV max. Approx 10us min pulse width. So your amplifier must emulate the scope preamp with a comparator. Keep in mind cable capacitance will attenuate the 47pF series cap so it must be kept very short with twisted pair being around 15 pF/ft . You see a resistive divider ...


1

Almost any coax can be rated for 5kV with >= 1mm of dielectric insulation but only the ones with this specification will likely be guaranteed because voids in the plastic or contaminants may cause partial discharge (PD) impulses when exposed to this kV DC level. You can choose a coax suited to the rise time of pulses you desire (BW=0.35/Tr) and the ...


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