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How do I go about solving the current I1 using Thevenin's Theorem?

I don't think the schematic editor here includes your voltage and current source symbols. And it's unusual to use J for a current source, my experience. But I'll use your variable naming, regardless. ...
periblepsis's user avatar
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Transient response of capacitor connected to current source with no resistor

Well, the voltage- and current relation in a capacitor is given by: $$\text{I}_\text{C}\left(t\right)=\text{V}_\text{C}'\left(t\right)\text{C}\tag1$$ So, when \$\displaystyle\text{I}_\text{C}\left(t\...
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Solving for V and I in a diode circuit by making assumptions

if I went in the opposite direction, the diode would not be forward biased as was assumed, so there is a contradiction. Is that the right idea? Yes. This is a better way to think of it than to say ...
The Photon's user avatar
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Transient response of capacitor connected to current source with no resistor

Start with the integral equation. The voltage across a capacitor is equal to the integral of the current as a function of time. If the current is a constant, it falls out of the integral. That ...
AnalogKid's user avatar
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Transient response of capacitor connected to current source with no resistor

A capacitor that is fed with a constant current will experience a constant voltage rise. $$\frac{dV}{dt}=\frac{I}{C}$$
Math Keeps Me Busy's user avatar

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