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7

I haven't found a distributor, but a (the?) manufacturer is Dalvey Products Supply Ltd.; it's in their catalog here, and the datasheet is here. It's an unusual component, and it may well have been a production run specifically for Casio. On the other hand, email is cheap and you could ask them if and where you can buy one, or if they will send you a sample. ...


5

It is consistent with the symptoms of no audio through the speakers. You could probe with a scope to check if there's signal, or just short the pins that should be shorted by the dead switches and check if the loudspeaker works. I guess this is what the illustration means: When you insert the jack, the springs are pushed (red arrow) so pin 4 no longer ...


5

After some detective work, I can give you some steps towards an answer but not a full answer. Perhaps you (or someone else) can build on this. Does anyone knows about it? That logo is from "Core Logic" in South Korea (i.e. Corelogic Co. Ltd., who don't seem to be related to any other company of a similar name) so not a surprise that Samsung chose ...


11

The pin layout is largely compatible in Microchip's line and there is a device ID (part number and silicon revision) factory programmed at a fixed location in newer PIC devices. Programmers such as PICKit attempt to read the device ID. As far as I know, Microchip does not publish an official exhaustive list of device IDs, however those who create programmers ...


1

Datasheet says it is 10A per package so 5A per diode.


3

Seems I don't have enough reputation to comment so I'll try to post my answer. To me it seems like an old resistor and it does have a color code, it's black-navy-brown. Or just navy-brown on a black body or the other way around. I've seen similar resistors in old radio receivers.


1

Metalized Patchs over Dielectric Substrate (MW dielectrics , low loss), EFFICIENCY is the KEY word here...Since ALL dielectris waste signal...Gain is small and a little beter on stacked patches


5

I think it is a fuse, mainly because of the "F3" marking next to it, and because I have seen this cryptic marking before on a Littlefuse fuse. A photo with more "context", and a look at the traces of the PCB would help to make sure it is indeed a fuse. If Littlefuse's markings happen to be universal, which I am not sure of, you can find ...


4

This looks very much like the body of a fuse holder/disconnect. It holds a fuse to isolate the distribution transformer (big grey cylinder). The power company can also remove it to disconnect the transformer. From: https://www.w8ji.com/power_line_noise.htm


1

mkeith's reply led me down a rabbit hole of JST connectors. Turns out this connector (1.25mm pitch) is actually a Molex PicoBlade (which is commonly confused with JST XH that also has 1.25mm pitch).


2

This appears to be a part number specific to the programming of the CPU/DSP based on a generic part. For example, here is a zh-jieli JL 6905A that has a BT 4.2 radio. So these cheap little BT 4.2 gadgets from 2017 onward may have this generic device: http://img005.hc360.cn/k1/M09/34/E3/wKhQwFmw58KEPsWjAAAAAJGE4z0447.pdf It may be that buyers order a ...


1

The broken part resembles the one on the right in this picture. It appears similar to this rotary encoder switch with a push switch. It's a 5 pin SMD type with three pins for the encoder and two for the push switch. Quadrature pulses generated by the rotary encoder switch would be used for scrolling through the menu and the push switch for selecting an ...


5

This is not a diode, but a tantalum capacitor. When powered up, there should be about 3.3 volts across it. To build off of what I replied to one of your earlier posts, try removing the capacitor and powering the device up. Decoupling capacitors might not be required for it to function. Replace it with any moderate capacitance cap if it still doesn't work. ...


3

It is the innards of a light up balloon that you can find at Walmart. Image from here You can see that the grey angled piece is part of a switch mechanism activated by a slide switch on the side. This is now distorted and partially on the upper half.


2

It seems most likely to be a "Finger Light" as starcat suggests. The ones in that ad advise that they have a push on-off button and the few that I have seen have also had a switch. Due to the VERY low cost of manufacture the switch may be rather "informal" - sometimes a sliding wedge pushes an LED lead against a battery contact. Such ...


1

It might be some kind of emergency torch. Perhaps there was originally a plastic tab between two connections. Pulling it out would acticate the torch.


0

OMG ! That's a Siemens MKT range capacitor, 2.2nF or 2200pF whichever you prefer, 630V. Polyester film. Used to see lots of them decades ago, Once very popular, especially in European products. The capacitance value is proportional to the length of the body, which is 'cut' to length to suit the value. Available in 5mm and 7.5mm pitch.


1

Ceramic resonator (3 lead type), probably 4 MHz. Fits the bill on account of the X1 board identifier (X is normally a crystal but resonators fit the bill well). Ceramic resonators are often used in inexpensive consumer items as they're cheaper than crystals at some expense in specifications.


0

The name of the connector is 5 pin GX16 aviation connector.


0

I designed in a 1x16 character VFD display into a product back in the early 1990s. Like this one it also came from Futaba. This was a 'bare' display with no driver chip as yours seems to be. Driving the display helps if you consider that it resembles a multi-anode thermionic valve (vacuum tube), actually a multi anode, multi grid directly heated cathode ...


2

Doesn't exist. That's a proprietary PCB designed & manufacturers by (for?) the OEM equipment vendor. That PCB is so cheap, they didn't even spring for a packaged IC. See the little black blob? THat's epoxy covering a bare silicon chip which they die-bonded to the PCB. That's "toy grade" stuff, literally.


0

Probably an ST LIS3MDLTR 3-axis magnetoresistive (not Hall) sensor.


2

It's a 100K linear taper pot designed with a mechanical construction to allow use of hardware and knob for radio tuning. Probably made by one of the many potentiometer manufacturers in China. Here is a similar construction one: I don't think you're going to be able to easily find a replacement unless you live in China (and even there it would not be ...


2

The mosfet marked with SP1 645 is possible to be "SSM6J501NU P-channel 10A FET" - this is what google has found and it seems to be in the same package as the one in your photo. You could try to search for it's pair, filter on a supplier website 10A N-channel mosfets in that package and see what you get. I also damaged the same ESC by connecting it ...


0

If you measure or know the resistor values, and observe the capacitor voltage charging and discharging waveforms with an oscilloscope when pushing and releasing buttons, the capacitor value can be calculated from the RC time constant. So it might be easier to remove the working capacitor and measure it, if you have a device that can measure capacitor values.


2

Can you determine whether those are resistors, or field coils? If they are field coils, a useful search term is "compound motor". These incorporate both series winding and parallel field coils : the combination can flatten the torque curve of the motor (which falls off at high speed with just a series field winding). They were big news in "...


0

just a educated guess, but with 2 excitation coils you could easily select between 3 speeds with 2 relays, or have one for raw speed selection and one for more fine grained speed regulation. I remember a elevator utilizing a DC Motor and 2 speeds - but I can't remember if it was just done with a simple resistor, as it was only used for a few second prior to ...


0

Might be a non standard variant of Mini-DIN https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mini-DIN_connector#Non-standard_connectors


0

I removed and sized it today, looks like 2.04 mm square package that looks exactly like the one on the attached spec sheet... but not the same...cannot find those markings...


5

TL;DR; It's likely a Richtek R7735GGE PWM flyback controller. There are many controllers in this format all with the same package (SOT23-6) and similar pinouts, so it's hard to narrow down the exact ones. So a bit of sleuthing was in order. Most of them seem to use a similar format for their markings, something along the lines of ###YWW where ### is some ...


3

Other answers have identified the connector as a 1/4" jack. However, note that if you think you might want to use this guitar with a guitar strap in the future, this might be a good time to replace the jack with an "acoustic endpin jack". This functions electrically the same as a 1/4" jack, but it adds a machined flange around the opening ...


10

Maybe this is the chip you seek: -


5

Put the board in the freezer for 30 minutes then when you pull it out, as it thaws often you will see the outline of any markings that were removed. My suspicion is it's one of those 2-5 cent controllers EEvblog wrote about


3

I'm trying to build my own circuit that does the same thing ... As already written, the IC is either a microcontroller or a custom IC. If it is a custom IC, you have no chance to get the same IC and you have to use a microcontroller (price: about 1 Euro or 1 US-Dollar plus about 30 Euros/Dollars for a programming device) if you want to build such a device ...


6

Search for 6.35 mm mono jack socket.


8

That is a 1/4" Mono Jack sometimes also called a 1/4" Phone Jack. It takes a 1/4" Mono Plug. (These are very common) The circuit symbol looks like this: See above. The upper terminal is the signal, and the lower is 'common' That is just the 1/4" female mono (or phone) jack Look HERE for an example. These are extremely common and ...


4

Looks very much like a standard 1/4" Mono jack. These are standard for guitars and much other musical equipment. You can safely replace it with a Stereo 1/4" jack by connecting the Ring and Sleeve pins together.


5

It's probably a simple 8-bit MCU like a cheap 12F PIC or similar. It's also possible it's a custom IC if they're manufactured in hundreds of thousands. If you are simply trying to recreate the behaviour, pick any little microcontroller (e.g. PIC or ATTiny) and program in the behaviour you want.


12

A 555 can't simply do what that chip does, so it's not a 555. It is most likely a cheap microcontroller that runs a button-reading LED-blinking program to make it work. Or a specific chip made for these kind of products, but a microcontroller allows to just use one chip for all kinds of different products.


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