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8

That looks like an SO239 UHF connector. That's the socket that goes with the PL259 plug. The term "UHF connector" is somewhat misleading. It was developed in the 1930s. Back then, UHF meant "over 30MHz." These days, UHF is 300 MHz to 3GHz.


1

Looks like it's either a JST VA or VAJ connector. img source: https://www.jst.com/products/crimp-style-connectors-wire-to-board-type/vaj-connector/ Both of these series will mate with the same header (B2P3-VH and B2P3S-VH) so either one should work See the datasheets for all of the part numbers for the housings and pins: VA datasheet: https://www.jst.com/...


1

Unfortunately the official JST connectors are strictly wire-to-board for those series, which is why you will see pigtail harnesses that have wires soldered to the PCB connector. There are a lot of companies in China making compatible equivalents like what you've found, but the part numbering is going to be completely dependent on whoever is making them and ...


1

I used this Coax connector identification utility to identify it as a TS-9 male plug. For example, from L-com. "Disclosure: I created and run the Connector Identification Utility website linked in this answer"


0

I used this Connector Identification Utility to identity them as Wurth WR-WTB 620 connectors. Part number 620304124022 Digikey page. "Disclosure: I created and run the Connector Identification Utility website linked in this answer"


0

It's the PCB header for a 2-row, unlatched, wire-to-board. If you tell us the exact pitch (https://www.google.com/search?q=connector+pitch) we may be able to identify it. Or, help yourself to this connector identification utility: connector:http://connectorbook.com/identification.html?st=1&nm=by_names&bm=by_compon&c=interior_rect_conn&u=...


4

That's a capacitor. Generally you would get the service manual for the monitor which has the schematics and part list to figure out which capacitor model and manufacturer it is to find specs for the capacitor C103.


1

Have you tried putting the part number into a search engine? Searching "BT169" turns up a number of results identifying it as a thyristor, not a transistor; here's a datasheet.


1

You need a legend from the drawing from the project plan package. The location of the box near the motor suggests that the symbol in question is a transducer that is monitoring the motor. It could be a thermocouple. The symbol could also designate a group of transducers such as motor winding temperature, shaft rotation, air flow. The designation CP likely ...


2

It looks like a voltmeter selector switch (SS). Figure 1. Image source: Rayleigh. This allows the use of one (single-phase) voltmeter, 0 - 800 V in your case, to monitor phase to phase and phase to neutral voltages.


0

The third component is a tuned IFT probably at 455KHz .It is complemented by the orange ceramic resonator .This scheme provides selectivity on the AM section of this multiband receiver. Other tuned transformers and sometimes ceramic resonators tuned usually at 10.7 MHz provide FM selectivity,


2

This symbol does not seem to be adopted by modern standards for "Single-Line" Power grid Drawings. Rather now it looks a like a voltmeter symbol with an attachment. Delta generators might not be earthed, but Y neutral generators would be earthed. This might give some clue.


2

It's a cartridge circuit breaker as per this website entitled Electrical and Electronic symbols: - The bigger question will inevitably be - did the person making the diagram back in 1985 adhere to the standards or, were the standards of today the same as they were in 1985.


2

Repair tech here. This is an inductor for some high-power circuit (CPU/GPU or something else that requires high current; given the replacement spec, probably not CPU/GPU, but still something relatively current-hungry). You seem to have chosen the part correctly (impossible to be certain; I would advice to pick a coil with small resistance but maximum ...


2

It's a thermal fuse for safety. It cuts power to something when that thermal fuse heats above the limit.


0

Yes, looks like the part (0.82uH inductor.) This would be for a fairly high-current dc-dc converter that switches at a high frequency. But… what caused it to fry? That’s the next thing to check into.


1

If you are just needing a few plugs, modify the receptacle and get a std pair because , you will spend more time looking to find this part in Asia as it is never sold to consumers. It is not a user repairable part and often just used on cheap disposable products. One std part is the IEC connector for power receptacle on cables. But then finding the mating ...


3

T5 or T8 Tube Light 3 Terminal Female connector.


4

The lowest safe voltage for a lithium cell is around 3.0V irrespective of the capacity. Below this the cell will be damaged, but for longer life don’t discharge below 3.2V


10

Analog devices ADA4927-1YCPZ. H1N marking stated in the datasheet.


0

It is manufacturer JST, PH family of 2.0mm pitch connectors. Part number for top entry through-hole 4 pin should be B4B-PH-K-S. In case they are SMD (your pic is too bad to tell), then it is B4B-PH-SM4-TB instead. https://www.jst-mfg.com/product/detail_e.php?series=199


2

It's a wire ferrule. 'An electric wire ferrule (sometimes electric end terminal) is a metal tube crimped over stranded wire to secure the strands within a screw terminal. Electrical insulation may be included to protect any exposed portion of the wire not completely inside the screw terminal post. Stranded wire is preferred for most electrical applications ...


2

It's probably AD8656, a low noise precision op amp.


2

It is a HA17431UA shunt regulator chip. Similar to a TL431, Vref = 2.50V. The large chip is probably a motor driver array of some kind. The pins suggest it is for driving a sizable 3-phase BLDC motor.


33

That's an insulated bootlace crimp ferrule. Insultated so that there is no touch danger when fully inserted into the terminal block. The insulation covers the funnel which guides the strands into the tubular section. Bootlace because it's similar to those used to stop boot laces from fraying. Crimp because a crimping tool is used to clinch the wires. ...


5

I've seen SMD fuses like this before. This one looks to be a UNHH20600L. Rated for 2.3A, 50V, according to this site. The part seems to be from Panasonic Spec. sheet.


0

May be an RF coaxial cable, with an SMB female 90° and an F-type male push-on connector, used to connect a sat receiver to its antenna.


4

The comments about solder thieves (the unicorn horns) are spot on. In some cases you'll find two different boards of the same basic design with different orientation of the thieves because of the way multiple boards were panelized. This is from the era when it was cheaper to cut and place jumpers in the board than have a double sided plated through hole ...


1

It appears to be a TPS62172 3.3V switching regulator (buck converter.) The package appears to match your part: This circuit shows a typical setup: SW and VOS are pins 6 and 7, which have an inductor between them just like on your circuit board:


1

Power coils radiate heat better when not mating with insulation on FR4 board especially with lower design margins to thermal runaway. PU adhesive with high tensile strength would be used. Resistors tend to be derated 50% when nearby but will also be elevated if lower temps are needed. Caps are already thermal insulators with thin foil and dielectric and ...


14

It is not a capacitor, it's an inductor, and it's not leaking, it is held firmly in place with glue.


3

It is called FASTON. More precisely: Fastons are the metal pieces that are crimped on a wire, they are inside plastic cover to make a two-terminal connector. Search for "faston cover" or "faston connector". It is probably 6.3 mm faston, that is standard size. The plastic piece may be available in many slightly different sizes that look ...


1

It is 03062023 from Molex Wire to Wire "Standard .062"+ and Standard .062" Pin and Socket Connector Systems" connector


2

They are just inductors. Their values can be decoded from the coloured dots in a way similar to decoding resistor color codes.


6

It's a really common part, or rather was in the days of through-hole technology. A 1.5A 600V bridge rectifier, versions of which were made by most every rectifier assembler in Taiwan, and probably originally GI (a faded memory). We bought a bunch from a company named Tesla in Yugoslavia one time. You can find their current datasheet here. They are probably ...


1

Component A is a fuse holder, the thermal sleeves are put on after soldering the joints on the holder. The type of fuse in this kind of holder is most probably a cylindrical classical fuse, where it will be irreversibly blown subject to high currents. It can be open by cutting the sleeve, and usually a lead, using a string, is at the top. opening that will ...


4

It looks like a fuse holder and if you look on the outside of the panel you should see a removable cap - usually with a screwdriver slot - to allow you to inspect and replace the fuse without having to take the cover off the system. Image source: Littlefuse. The fuse is a protection device and the fine wire inside it is designed to melt and break the ...


5

Component A looks like a fuse holder to me. So it would be blocking current because the fuse blew, and it would NOT be safe to bypass it. Can you get to the other side of the panel that it's mounted to to see if you can open the fuseholder and replace the fuse?


0

That board could have been laid out in any PCB CAD program. The layout person just has to put most tracks on the bottom side, and ensure that any top side tracks are short and straight.


27

It's a single-sided punched paper-based phenolic PCB. Extremely cheap per square meter in high quantity compared to FR4, but some tooling costs for the dies. The features you show are to get high yield without a lot of touch-up after wave soldering. The parts on the bottom are immersed in molten solder as the board moves through one more more "wave(s)&...


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