New answers tagged

2

Do not use an extension cord because when you chop it off, the three conductors are too close together for comfort when you connect to the ground wire. At worst, get one of those plugs ends at the hardware store to make your own extension cord. They open up with with some screws and provide 3 points inside to connect wires to. Connect a wire to the ground ...


9

Using the safety ground on a three prong outlet is a valid way to ground yourself for ESD purposes. Many lab benches I have used have the ESD mat grounds attached to the ground that comes from a power cord feeding the benches. You can also buy an ESD grounding plug for a wrist strap that plugs into the ground on an outlet. Here is one example. https://www....


0

in your application I'de use kapton on the heatsink and then a space-filling glue betetween the taped heatsink and the board: eg. silicone, epoxy, or hot-melt.


2

This is where some more info can be found about the component I was looking for. Here is the datasheet: (Click image for larger version) Source of original PDF version of datasheet image: Ogatama In my case, I removed the fuse, and looked underneath to be able to see the reference. It said SEFUSE D6X238. Happens that the '238' part is apparently a lot ...


-1

Yes, an unfortunately common problem. The Y caps are indeed the source of the buzz. I have even modelled their influence in the past, using circuit analysis software. Moving them around (placement) won't help, as it's not the issue. Short answer, you're taking a risk with third party power supplies. Some horrible things go on in SMPS's. The electrical 'noise'...


6

There are solutions around if you google for "Hacking Dell Charger Identification". However, they all require specific microcontrollers, programmers, PCB, soldering, etc. Since 99.99% of SMPS topologies are similar, I decided to use the output stage of original charger as a whole. I cut the original charger's 19.5V cable, reconnect all cables, ...


4

The cells in your current battery are all the same age. They've all been put through the same load in the same environment. Barring some obvious external trauma, the likelihood that another one of the cells wears out soon is fairly high. You'll probably have better (and possibly cheaper) results replacing the whole thing at once than replacing the cells ...


2

There is a protection circuitry on the batteries, once it senses a failure or interference it transmit to the computer not to charge or use the batt, there is nothing you can do to reset it. Replacing any of the cell is a waste of time.


3

I'd suggest a single slightly LARGER capacity replacement cell. A smaller mAh one will again "bottom out" first and if the BMs is not doing a per cell protection it will again die. A larger cell will tend to have more charge than the others IF all are fully charged to start. Testing cell capacity is a very good idea and not hard - only annoying ...


6

Don't mix different batteries! (unless you know very, very well what you are doing) The battery management system is probably going to keep them from exploding, but they will not work as intended and will probably fail quickly. If you have a balancing charger/analyser and a lot of patience, you may be able to measure the capacity of all the cells that you ...


Top 50 recent answers are included