New answers tagged

1

For the most part, putting cells in parallel just makes them behave like a bigger single cell. So, if you take four cells and hook all of them together in parallel, it appears to a circuit to just be a single cell with four times the capacity. BMS's are built to manage cells in series. Along with current and voltage protections, it monitors each "cell" in ...


1

It should not have an affect on the battery, the magnetic field my deviate the path of ions and electrons slightly but not have any effects on the battery itself.


0

Voltage and current are sensed using entirely different (but interconnected) components. Voltage is sensed using a voltage divider, normally using fairly large resistance values to keep power dissipation down in the divider. For signals which have a DC component, such as yours, current is sensed using a shunt resistor, which will be a very low resistance, ...


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I somewhere read, that CC-CV is from an electronics point of view simply CC, so the voltage might vary. CC-CV stands for Constant Current and Constant Voltage, which means both voltage and current are regulated. If the battery does not accept the set current then the voltage will be held constant and the current must go down. This is the standard charge ...


2

As always, it depends. How closely matched are the capacities and internal resistance of the batteries in parallel and how much current will you push? If very little compared to capacity then most likely no problem. A lot of current and big mismatch in capacity and internal resistance then the following will happen: (Image stolen from Wolf at ...


0

According to battery-testing firm Cadex Electronics, a fully charged lithium-ion battery will lose about 20 percent of its capacity after a year of typical storage. Increase the storage temperature to just above 100 degrees Fahrenheit such as in a hot attic for example and that number increases to 35 percent. So the environment it is stored in is a factor as ...


2

Battery gauges often don't work well with aged batteries, so the state of charge you are reading can be pretty inaccurate. Also, the ideal state of charge for long battery lifetime (obviously not runtime) is around 50% charge. If you leave it plugged in all of the time at 100% charge you will reduce the useful life of the battery. Some laptop ...


0

Adding to the other answers If you don't want to use the battery, 40% should be optimal. But if you want to use it, you have to develop a different strategy. If you find out, your battery is usually discharged by 40% when you are on the road or wherever you aren't connected to the grid. Then you could find a tradeof between losing power and ageing the ...


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You also need to take into account how much the battery will discharge when idle and/or in use. For instance if you normally use 40% of battery charge during the day, and you want the day's average battery level to be 50%, then you might want to charge the battery up to 70%. Your daily use will then typically drain it down to 30%, which isn't so low that ...


1

would it be beneficial for my laptops battery capacity health to limit the charging to say 50%, when my laptop is plugged in for extended periods of time? Yes it would, most manufacturers of Li-Ion based batteries charge them to a charge level of around 40% to have the lowest stress level in the battery and extend their storage lifetime. (Actually the ...


-1

If you incorporate a cheap, off-the-shelf charging module between the solar cells and the battery you will solve all the problems, over charging and back flow through the solar cell. A typical one is here Many other similar modules are available on eBay and Banggood. Again other suppliers are available.


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Ale's answer to this is incorrect. Li-Ion cells with different capacity will take different time because a smaller-capacity cell will/might be charged first, and then will be overexposed to charging voltage (while the bigger cell still gets the charge). This will result in "overcharging" of the weaker cell, it will grow some bad chemistry inside, its ...


7

i'm aware that i need to use a 3S balance board, and a constant current converter to charge them You need more than just a current source. The charger must limit the voltage to 4.20V per cell (12.6V total), and (if you want to get more than 80% charge into the battery) then continuously reduce the current at that voltage until it reaches ~1/10 the set ...


5

Oxygen will leak in and slowly destroy the battery. A larger puncture could have cause a fire. Please dispose of the battery.


0

No blocking diode is required due to the internal PMOSFET architecture and have prevent to negative Charge Current Circuit. TP4056 modules do not take input current or reverse current form the circuit it is powering. You can use one PFET as a diode to block the current from the BAT+ module pin of the ESP to the OUT+ pin of the TP4056 ...


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