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'High Impedance' in this context means that the SO (chip data out) line is not being driven by the chip. This is represented in the diagram as a line at mid-level. In reality the SO pin is floating; the actual signal state is undefined and can't be counted on as a valid logic level. Good system design will ordinarily resolve this by adding a pull-up or pull-...


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It means just what it means, pin are having high impendence and is not sourcing or sinking any significant current. If you apply a HIGH or LOW external logic voltage level the whole line will stay in that state as this chip won't affect it having high internal resistance. As this is the SPI Slave Out pin it's left in that state when the slave aren't ...


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It means low current (negligible) or high resistance (ideally infinite). If an input is high impedance it will float to whatever the source is. If an output is high impedance it could float to any value, since it will be determined by the load and any leakage current that the loads transistors leak. (if there are any pull up or pull down resistors it will ...


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High impedance means it has a high resistance. This means it will not source or sink current easily. You can often treat a high impedance node as if it were disconnected. In this specific case, it means that pin isn't driving anything on the line, and other sources can affect it.


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If you right click on the graphical simulation output, you will get a fly-out menu. Choose File > Export data as text. You have the option of choosing which nodes to save.


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If the already existent comments and answer don't do it then you're probably referring to .savebias and .loadbias commands. See the help under LTspice > Dot Commands > .[LOAD/SAVE]BIAS: This command writes a text file to disk that is reloaded with a .loadbias command in a subsequent simulation. If you have a circuit that has a difficult-to-solve DC ...


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AFAIK ltspice can't directly reopen it's own output, at least from the job cards. However you should be able to export the waveform from the GUI and reimport that as a source with the .wave card. More info here https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/technical-articles/ltspice-simulation-using-wav-files/


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Assuming this is a direct-mapped cache, \$20\$ bits are reserved for tag. It means \$32-20=12\$ bits are reserved for index + offset. There are \$1024=2^{10}\$ cache lines, which means \$10\$ bits are needed to select a cache line ie., index = \$10\$ bits. The remaining \$12-10=2\$ bits should be for offset then. i.e., the cache-block/cache-line size = \$2^...


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