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For those who are interested, I got an answer from ST. The whole caluclation is in kB --> 1024Byte The flash memory has an information block, which contains the option bytes, so the calculation doesn't add up.


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EEPROM technology split into two branches in the early 1980s - one thin oxide (FLOTOX) with Intel and Seeq and the other thick oxide (Xicor). In the early days, there were weaknesses to both routes. Thin oxide leaked charge and thick oxide was inherently impossible to scale. There were other issues, but they don't apply here. Given the thick oxide didn't ...


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The question makes perfect sense in context of how things are kept simple in an usual textbook. There are no MMUs or other fancy base address selectors, it's just how to match a bit pattern on bus and decode it to a chip select for large enough a block of memory. The memory is said to be 512 kilobytes (0x80000) and can be assumed to be byte addressable in ...


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I've seen people do this before, it's really strange and was far more common back in the 80s (or earlier) when memory was really, really expensive and programs were short. The general concept is you run your address lines to a demultiplexer (or inverting demultiplexer, as in this case) and have a pull-up resistor from every data line to 5V. You then place a ...


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Alright I give it a shot. Without pretty pictures. What is my thought process here? The D-Flip-Flop without bells and whistles, clear and preset, tri-state output, etc. it has data in (D), clock in (C), and data out (Q), as you show in your hand writing. In your sketch, you have all your data inputs listen to the same bus and you use your address logic to ...


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