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Solved! servo.h library messes up with the Arduino pwm pins. It disables the 9,10 pins even we haven't connected a servo to that. That is the issue here. Have to use pwm other than (9,10) for the motor driver's enable pin.


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Q: Both are bldc sensorless motors? A: No, only the first one is a sensorless BLDC motor. The motor in image 2 has three Hall sensors (the ones enclosed in your red circle), thus it's not sensorless. Q: How can I know the difference between one physically? A: If you were to open up a sensored BLDC motor you will find three Hall sensors inside. A sensored ...


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As I commented on the question, you're probably better off with conventional relays given that: their cost scales better as you go for larger/more powerful motors they are less complicated (since you stated that you've never designed a circuit before) Having said that, if you wish to pursue the solid state approach then you're probably aiming at (MOS)FETs ...


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As you can see, the PWM switch off, then a short delay layer, the HO tried to switch off but for some reason, it cannot sink it to ground and stay floating for eternity later. HO is turning off. The voltage drops from about 184V to about 155V. Check the left white circle. LO is turning on very badly. Check the second white circle. For best turn on, \$V_{GS}...


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ESCs are used for brushless DC motors (BLDC). But PWM is used in both DC and BLDC. The topology of a ESC consists of a 3-phase inverter with back emf feedback to know when to switch (complicated circuitry). Commercial ESCs are designed with a PWM signal input. This happens to be the same as per the servo motors. They take a 50Hz PWM that ranges from 5% to ...


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PWM means Pulse Width Modulation, which is a method used in many power electronics applications to get a variable output voltage from a fixed input voltage. ESC means Electronic Speed Controller, the thing that converts the battery DC voltage to the Ac voltage your motor needs using PWM.


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The Hall transitions should be exactly 60 degrees apart. It's not uncommon to add in a few degrees advance on motors that will run only in one direction, but if this is a bidirectional motor, they are generally zero advance. There are three things that can practically alter the switching points - The position of the sensors themselves. They may actually be ...


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Extend wires on motor side. That side is expected to deal with voltage spikes due to the high inductance of the motor windings so some extra wire inductance from longer wires isn't a big deal. Not so on the battery side. DO NOT CUT THE MOTOR WIRES to add on connectors. Those wire strands are directly from the motor windings and are coated in enamel which is ...


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this should be -1 in both cases, because it refers to a negative feedback being unitary TF_DC_vel_closed = feedback(TF_DC_vel, -1) The \$ T \$ means the sampling period, so, every \$ T\$ seconds the system gets new sensor measurements and updates its output \$u(t)\$. Also, notice that you have not used at all gho. I would suggest discretizing \$G_{p1}\$...


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In the comments you say:- PWM frequency is about 1khz, it will be using LiPo or lead acid battery Battery-powered speed controllers don't usually bother with inductive filters. Inductance in the power supply leads is bad because it causes voltage spikes. Large low ESR bulk capacitors are usually added across the controller power input to reduce spikes....


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Having a datasheet that explains operation of a component is critical for integration in an embedded system such as drone. Unfortunately there is a surprising lack of technical data in the RC world mostly because RC enthusiasts arent driving their components with microcontrollers. I tried to drive a brushed motor with an ESC driven by an arduino just similar ...


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