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There are two aspects to Ethernet connectivity: signal integrity and content. You’d use an oscilloscope with suitable differential probes to capture the raw signals and analyze them with (usually) an Ethernet signal analysis package on the oscilloscope. That’s probably over $10k worth of equipment - if you aren’t in that line of work, you’d do a rental. ...


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Sounds like you want a protocol tester more than you want an oscilloscope. But oh well, that's not the question here. I was told that in order to troubleshoot and test on this standard, the scope must be capable of 1 GHz No. Even wikipedia will tell you that it only requires CAT3 cabling, and that doesn't guarantee a bandwidth even close to that. Ah, ...


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Put the inductor back in the junk box. You don't know its value, so it is of no help in finding the value of your capacitor. Instead, get out some resistors, and set up this circuit: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab C1 is your unknown capacitor. Try various values of R1 until you get approximately half the voltage on V_C as ...


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For others who may come across this: I had a similar looking problem but it turns out the issue was that I needed to set the MOSI pin to output manually. I'm using Arduino IDE's built in SPI.h and Arduino Nano 168p. Also, I'm using SPI.beginTransaction(SPISettings(3000000, MSBFIRST, SPI_MODE1)) instead of the default SPI.begin(), so maybe the default sets ...


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How to plot the real scale waveform data? Do I have to multiply it with vertical scale? You can do that, or use another factor based on scope probe attenuation or other factors that make sense for your ultimate objective. And what about the time? What to do if I want to plot the waveform data in the time domain? Since there's no time data and all I have is ...


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Just use your eyes and brain and look at what you see: - Then using excel (that's where your data appears to be) plot a graph of that data. This site isn't here to teach anyone how to use excel (or a spreadsheet) so that bit is up to you.


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There are three requirements for a 10:1 passive probe to work correctly The oscilloscope must be used on the 1 MΩ input The tip ground of the probe must be connected by a short wire to the ground on the circuit local to the clock driver The probe must be tuned to the oscilloscope's input capacitance Although the resistance of a 1 MΩ scope input is well ...


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As tlfong01 correctly noted in the comments,the scope you are using is a digital storage oscilloscope. You need to turn on the storage function of your scope. From page 22 of the manual: Push the "Storage" button so that it lights up, and you should be able to see the whole trace. You may need to turn on the available single shot function. That ...


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Instead of using an oscilloscope how about building a simple diode detector circuit. This would give you complete control over the impedance characteristics of your measurement tool. See here for an example http://techlib.com/electronics/detect.htm


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For RF measurements, it is best to scale the output down to 50 Ohms so that probe capacitance has less impact. 3 pF probe 100pF < 10 Ohms at 180 MHz even so a 3pF probe is still ~ 230 ohms reactance @ 160 MHz so low capacitance (1pF) diff. active FET probes are the best bet from TEK which are common industry tools who use these signals often. ~40 dB ...


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Quantization steps are visible in the waveform. The amplifier can't generate those, so they either come from the (presumably digital) signal generator, or from the scope analog to digital converter. However... If the quantization steps were from the scope ADC not having enough bits, then the sloped top would be flat and horizontal: it would be a single ...


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My question is can I just use my oscilloscope to measure the voltage across a capacitor Of course, you can. But there's one thing to consider: There's a circuit consisting of passive elements inside the scope's probe. And, in your circuit, you are loading the capacitor with those elements. So the measurement can be affected by these elements. Your circuit ...


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You can, and you did. Largely this was possible because you used storage scope. If you had only an analog scope available, then to keep an image on the screen you would have likely needed to repeat the same experiment over and over, alternately charging and discharging the capacitor using a square wave source. You also appear to have chosen a small enough ...


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