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1

A preamp is a pre-amplifier and used to condition line-level signals - typically < 1 V and impedance > 50 kΩ - by buffering them and adding tone control, etc. This is completely inadequate for driving loudspeakers. The pre-amp should feed into a power amplifier which will accept the line-level signal and boost both voltage and current to drive the 8 Ω ...


1

Yes, your thinking of both series and parallel circuits are correct. The total supply voltage of 6V is correct for 6V worth of 1.5V lamps in series, and total supply of 1.5V is correct for 1.5V lamps in parallel.


0

Yes, this is correct. You can use a 1.5V power supply if you connect them in parallel. With a series connection, beware that the bulbs must have the same resistance (so use the same type of bulbs). Otherwise, the voltage will be shared unevenly according to their resistance, and some bulbs will be overloaded and burn out, and some bulbs will be too dim. A ...


2

You won't get far with intuitions like "Will V1 not overpower V2". You should approach such problems with rigorous equations. First, you should find all "nodes", these are parts that are connected with ideal wires (lines) and thus have the same potential (voltage). In this case, there are three nodes: the bottom part; top-left between V1 ...


6

7000W of LEDs? Are you lighting a stadium? Well, since this project will make you blind, it wouldn't be complete without the risk of electrocution, so let's wire the LEDs in series. As you noticed, the voltage across your COBs varies with current (and also temperature, and between each COB). So you can't drive them with a constant voltage supply, it has to ...


3

The MEAN WELL LSR-350-36 (there is no LSR-250-35) is not a good match for your project. LEDs need a regulated current to operate properly. The LSR-350-36 is a constant voltage power supply. You can approximate a constant current power supply from a constant voltage power supply, but that requires resistors in series with the LEDs and a voltage source ...


1

Update 2021apr14hkt2008 The OP has not yet given a user requirement of the venue for the 100 sets of COB LEDs, each set of 70W. This is easy to do, as we can easily find 12~24VDC 70W LED lamps. The following is an example. AliExpress 70W DC 12V Dimmable COB LED Light with Controller Strip Board Outdoor Camping Lights DIY Fishing Rod - US$10 ~ 12 Notes If ...


0

The reason why there is always a voltage drop in an electric circuit without giving consideration to the internal resistance of the battery or the voltage source is the resistance in the wires used in the circuit connection. Remember the Resistance in any wire which is not a super conductor is given as R= PL/A


0

It should be fine, assuming the terminal voltages don't exceed the limits of either battery; also assuming you connect them under a condition where the voltage difference is small (so that a large current doesn't flow between them). When charging/discharging, the two batteries will have equal voltages -- one may be more depleted than the other, but neither ...


0

Can I put these two in parallel? Some sources say that the voltage has to be the same other sources say everything must be exactly the same. Two batteries with the same nominal voltage rating, can easily have different open circuit voltages. When two batteries with different open circuit voltages are connected together in parallel, current will flow from ...


3

R4 is 10k not 10 so your initial schematic has an error. Otherwise, your thought process is correct.


0

RS485 is the right answer for your problem. It's master-slave interface meant for fairly high speed (up to 10 Kbyte/s) and long distances (up to 1 km). Slave devices can be wired in parallel. It requires a UART interface on the microprocessor. All microprocessors have at least one. It requires a very simple software stack that you may find by googling: "...


0

If you want to multiplex your devices using the USB interface, make sure you: Have an external USB hub or The data collector system has USB hub on-board USB is a 1:1 peer-to-peer interface. ou can't just wire in parallel the extarnal devices.


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TLDR: Don't even try scenario 1. It will damage one of your supplies and potentially overheat the strip. Fire hazard! Scenario 2 is safe but you will need common ground (i.e. common reference) for both supplies and your controller board Long Explanation: Whenever there's doubt about something, always simplify your diagram. At the end of the day with know the ...


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