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A coil 1 uH and 30 mOhm should be measurable with a vector analyzer, at least between 1 to 10 MHz, check this image of the specs of a E5061B where I marked in orange the area that should be interesting for you: You can find the rest of the specs here here. Are you sure you did a correct de-embedding?


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What you've shown is called a type 2 compensators. There are three compensators which can "boost" the phase from 0 to 180° at the selected crossover frequency \$f_c\$. You actually adjust the "boost" in phase by spreading the zero(es) and the pole(s): Type 1, a simple integrator (pole at the origin), no phase boost. Type 2, a pole at the origin, a zero and ...


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For chip itself: ·Input Supply Voltage(VCC):-0.3V~8V But like mentioned above "MPPT" is better to utilize the power.


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Yes you can use that solar panel. It will have excess power capabilities in sunshine, but that power goes nowhere. Note: You may still need to put two panels in parallel for cloudy seasons. The max possible current from the panel is not destroying the charger under normal conditions. An analogy: A car battery can give 100 Amps, but still it doesn't blow a ...


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Modified to better suit what the OP probably requires i want simple calculation of capacitance of capacitor where it will affect in rush current Firstly and importantly, the capacitor on each MOSFET needs to be in parallel with the zener in order to achieve inrush current limiting but, the confusion here surrounds both MOSFETs being in parallel. They ...


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Parasitic capacitance in the MOSFET between drain and source plus external parasitic capacitances mean that when the MOSFET turns on, it is trying to short out these previously charged parasitics and hence, there is always an impulse of current into the MOSFETs drain. Same applies with IGBTs and regular BJTs except internal parasitic device capacitance is ...


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A silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) is a type of thyristor. Another type of thyristors is the Gate turn-off thyristor (GTO). A diode base rectifier is called an uncontrolled rectifier. With the use of SCRs (among other devices) you get a controlled rectifier. The benefits of a controlled rectifier is that you can control the load voltage and power factor. ...


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The outside of the element is a metal tube, which must be earthed for safety. Inside that is a length of resistance wire, such as a nichrome alloy. The gap between the resistance wire and the outer tube is filled with heatproof mineral insulation. As the element gets old, the outer tube can develop holes, letting water in. At this point, the element ...


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In general PFC converters in general have to fulfill two criteria. Firstly, the input power equals the output power (neglecting converter losses), meaning that \begin{align} V_{in,rms} \cdot I_{in,rms} = V_{out} \cdot I_{out} \end{align} Secondly, the shape of the input current has to follow the shape of the input voltage to ensure high power factor and ...


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Since everyone seems to have been variously confused at different times about your question, let me re-draw and re-phrase it: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab (The above reflects the case after the switch opens and after the current source has been added, both at \$t=0\$.) On the left is your new circuit (without initial ...


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One way to get the initial condition is through the Thevenin equivalent circuit of the current source and the resistor in parallel of it. Then, the initial DC voltage of the cap and DC current of the inductor can be solved easily, considering L1 as a short, and C1 as an open circuit.


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AC supplies are normally provided by live and neutral wires. The neutral wire is so-called because it has been "neutralised" by connection to earth through an earthing rod at the utility transformer or/and at the entrance to the building (depending on the country's regulations). simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. ...


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Assuming you'd like to ground the negative output of the rectifier, let's think about what would happen. A bridge rectifier alternately switches the hot and the neutral to its output terminals such that the negative half of the sine wave always lands at the negative terminal of the bridge output. That means that half the time the hot is connected to the ...


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Picking a topology for a DC-DC converter starts with defining the requirements. Personally, I'd first check the necessity of isolation. If it is not necessary then, depending on the relationship between VOUT and the range of VIN (e.g. check if output voltage will be lower than input voltage for the whole input range, as in your case) I'd go for buck (output ...


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I recommend picking a topology, and running down the design path enough to get a feel for if you can meet your requirements. If you can't, and can't see a way to easily fix it, move on to the next topology and repeat. If you run out of topologies, edit your question to reflect the work you've done, where you're having trouble meeting the requirement, and ...


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You need some way of shifting the input signal to the new ground level. The easiest way is to use an isolation amplifier. How practical that is depends on any accuracy and cost constraints you may have and whether you can produce a supply rail relative to the Vee (you could always use an isolated DC-DC converter. There are probably commercial modules that ...


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To model the P-MOS transistor in LTspice you do not need to know the \$W\$ and \$L\$. The simples model used the \$K\$ factor and \$V_{TH}\$. The drain currency is equal to: $$I_D = \frac{K}{2}(V_{GS} - V_{TH})^2$$ And using the datascheetplot, we can also find \$V_{TH}\$ using this equation: $$V_{TH} = \frac {V_{GS1} \sqrt{I_{D2}} -V_{GS2} \sqrt{...


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P-channel MOSFET that can produce a max of -34 A MOSFETs don't produce current, this PMOS has a maximum rating of \$I_D\$ = -34 A. In principle you can change the generic PMOS model parameters such that it will model a behavior that is somewhat to that PMOS. But it will be a hell of a job even if you know what you're doing. I would not even consider doing ...


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I'm not sure what the specs. of your piezo is, but you need a really high voltage to drive them. You will probably not be able to drive them with the outputs of a regular MCUs. If you have a DAC inside Arduino, connect it to a high Voltage audio amp specific for piezo speakers.


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That's a good question. Quick answer no, it depends on the conductor surface area and not the insulator area (Epoxy). But let's say there is no board heatsink. Using datasheet specs Package θja Pdis sides & top area Trise=125°C for Ta= +25°C,Tj= +150°C I multiplied the area by 1k and divided by the max power rating....


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Sometimes the \$R_{\theta JA}\$ and \$R_{\theta JC}\$ are separately specified so you could subtract the two to get \$R_{\theta CA}\$, but wow, that's going go be a very inaccurate guess. I wouldn't depend on it. The \$R_{\theta JA}\$ is highly variable with the PCB layout and specifications, air flow and all sorts of others things, particularly for SMT ...


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To have different rise and fall times. These are usually different in a MOSFET anyways and you have shoot-through to worry about if two MOSFETs are stacked like in a half-bridge.


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To use AC in a lab power supply (the goal is to limit/measure current in lab, not to do it for a high power device) I thought to rectify voltage to get DC, sense/limit and alternate to a AC again with inverter. Maybe this is not the efficient way to do it, but I think it is simple.


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The voltage I'm measuring can exceed 500V and if I used a simple resistor divider, I'm concerned with the source impedance being too high and causing reflections in the measurement cable which would completely invalidate any overshoot/pre-shoot measurements. I think you can safely use a resistor divider. If you attenuated at 500:1 you’d get a signal ...


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if you need to trust what the scope shows you, then rent a TEK HV probe. And keep the GND lead very short.


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For your specific problem, I agree with @aconcernedcitizen that simulators are best as the analytic approach is very challenging. That said, you also ask how to solve analytically the case if there is a purely resistive load and no grid inductance (deducted from your graphs). Here is a go at that. General case with R load We want to find the amplitude of ...


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You're wrong in almost anything. If you use an isolated gate driver, then it's obviously that GND and VSSA and VSSB should have no connection, else you don't need an isolated driver. For the fully controlled solution 0 to 100% PWM you need three power supplies. The VCC, VDDA and VDDB, last two shall have high insulation voltage. If you plan to drive a half ...


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No, it won't work. the supply of the high-side transistor (VDDA) needs to be floating. That is normally achieved by using a bootstrap circuit or a dc/dc convertor. You need two supplies for the secondary (VDDs). The low-side can be a "normal" 15V but the high-side needs to be floating. It is normally recommended to joing signal gorund and power ground on ...


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What happens now with the current /voltage on the inductive load? Then again it can't simply just drop to zero, in the case of the current. But where to does the inductive load discharges? It discharges into a voltage source, the inductive load becomes a generator for that amount of time. Thyristor conducts the current as before (until the current drops ...


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Never heard about "burst-mode". Pulse skipping is a simple method to limit the output voltage / current within the maximum permitted margins. The simplest analogy is a children swing. You push every cycle in resonance as long you have enough amplitude, then you skip pushing until the swing goes lower. In a resonance circuit there is a similar behaviour, if ...


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This way, you halves the capacitance, doubles the power rating, internal resistance and lead inductance. As long as your selection of the cap has some reasonable margin, it should be good to go.


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Yes, your choice is right. You can manage more inputs and outputs with MC14051B, MC14052B, MC14053B. Link of the data-sheet is- https://www.onsemi.com/pub/Collateral/MC14051B-D.PDF To increase output voltage- To decrease input voltage use resistors according to the voltage divider rule.


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Something like this should work: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab The shunt resistor is 1 ohm, 1 A will cause 1 V voltage drop. set the maximum current allowed via non-inverting pin of the op amp. If voltage drop on the shunt is bigger than the reference voltage, op amp will drag it's output to negative rail and vice versa. ...


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A common self-latching relay circuit often used for machine control is: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Is this the sort of thing you are looking for? Pressing the "Start" button will operate the relay and apply power to the coil through the lower contact, so the relay remains on when the Start button is released. The ...


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There are many possible ways of 'latching' a relay electronically. The method below is one of many - whether it suits depends on the detailed requirement. Input C will latch the relay on when pulsed high, allow the relay to remain in it's last "driven state when left floating and Unlatch / deoperate the relay when pulsed low Or, separate latch and ...


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