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It is a gas discharge tube (GDT) in a glass package. In some power supplies they are shunting one of the common mode choke coils, so this is not an unique design. It makes somewhat sense that it seems to shunt high voltage transients so that they bypass the common mode choke neutral coil.


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Have you heard the expression "cut your coat according to your cloth"? 10kV transistors don't appear to exist, no. 1kV seems to be just about feasible with present technology and you can buy bipolar and IGBT transistors with that rating. They need appropriate cooling and sharp switching times to avoid overheating. using 1A and a 10Ah battery this ...


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We were offered 120V or 208V at at one US data center, so three phase is available. Six pulse rectifiers are efficient at making DC, but powerful DC circuits are hard to manage once you exceed the working voltage of your typical arc welder. Ordinary switched mode power supplies start with rectifier followed by a a power-factor correction circuit, these will ...


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My speculative answer: You wouldn't put a unidirectional device across an input CM winding for clamp suppression. It would conduct every half-cycle, after all. A bidirectional TVS or a gas-tube would work for clamping - in both cases, should sufficient voltage be present to cause breakdown, the TVS or gas tube would clamp the voltage. (This sort of event is ...


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"Design a power supply with a linear regulator and bypass transistor to regulate voltage to 12 volts and supply a maximum current of 5 amperes." The solution is presented in the 78xx series datasheet on page 20. I want to be able to design a linear regulated power supply but with a bjt near the load, ... No, you want to use a BJT to boost the ...


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The raspberry Pi cannot be connected through a resistor to AC mains. One because it is AC, and the Pi requires DC. Secondly, because it is not safe (AC mains should be isolated). Thirdly, because there is no regulation. By regulation, the Pi is a variable power load, the 2.5A is a max spec, so sometimes it might need less than 2.5A. Lets say it needs 1A then ...


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13V is a very unusual voltage for a USB charger. The only way to achieve it within the USB standard is to implement USB Power Delivery 3.0 plus PPS (Programmable Power Supply), which allows to change the voltage in small increment. Even then, the maximum voltage would either be 12V or 20V. This charger could still be safe if: It initially delivers 5V only. ...


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Using power formula for DC circuits: Power [Watts] = Voltage [Volts] x Current [Amps] If you are stuck with USB 2.0, then you are limited in how much current you can draw by the USB 2.0 specifications, which is 2A @ 5V, for a total of 2 * 5 = 10W. So, you then need to increase the voltage using what's called a boost converter, which will boost the voltage ...


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A similar product appears to have a 12V, 2A output: SEDNA - USB Type A 5v to 12V 2A DC DC Converter with 9 x 90 Degree Adapter Jack https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07952G6KT/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_EDrlFbDWTFCZ8 2A seems to be more than enough for your LEDs. Would have commented but not enough reputation.


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The power supply cannot adjust itself automatically to what the device expects. It can adjust the output voltage to try to compensate for the voltage drop on the wires based on current draw though, but the original is only rated 2.5A and the replacement is rated up to 4A. Get a proper 18V replacement, with 2.5A or more current rating.


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Safety is a concern--moisture ingress can conduct dangerous AC voltages to the outside of the case. There is probably also a slightly lower incidence of tampering when people know they can't easily reassemble the device. The big driver, though, is cost. Adding removable screws involves multiple operations per screw, whereas sonic welding is easily ...


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Data centers use 3 phase because utilities will insist on it for the amount of power they use. If they were to give them single phase, it would cause a severe imbalance of the 3 phase utility transmission lines. Single phase service drops are generally limited to 167.5kVA (around 800A) maximum, most data centers use thousands of amps.


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There are only a limited number of battery chemistries and each one has its own voltage so there are only a limited number of voltages. Also, battery voltage drops as they get discharged so you won't find exactly 12V. Search radio-controlled hobby websites. The most likely chemistries available to you, in order of increasing cost, increasing performance, ...


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80W motor with current of 40A and supply of 24V? Makes no sense at first look, but this 40A stall current is measured at speed = 0 (rotor locked), this is not a working range of the motor Your driver works as buck converter, so you don't need 2 x 40A x 24V supply power. You should use the nominal current of the motor, not the stall current for proper supply ...


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So, the question is whether the supply is operating correctly or not. A practical answer: The LM7812CT requires a voltage difference of at least 2VDC across its input and output terminals. This voltage is called Dropout Voltage. So the minimum input voltage for proper operation should be \$\mathrm{V_O+V_{DROP}=12+2=14V}\$. Since the input voltage comes from ...


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You have solved 'sparking at plug-in' by delaying mosfet 'turn-on'. Likewise you could avoid 'sparking at plug-out' by first turning off the mosfet and then plugging out the load. You would need to wire an additional switch to the controller.


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To make an "apples to apples" comparison, you'd need the capacity rating for both devices in watt hours. What you have is VA for one device and mAh for the other. VA (volt amperes) and watts are a power rating. mAh (milliampere hours) is (sort of) an energy rating. The unit "watt" doesn't have time factored into it. Energy always has ...


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I solved the issue. The pads of one of the switching transistor were lifted. I repair these pads and SMPS worked fine. Thanks for the support. @winny @RohatKılıç


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The sticker says 110V DC, and it's got brushes and a commutator. So, yes. As mentioned in the comments, it's for a bread machine that needs to start and stop suddenly, so it'll probably even handle momentary overload without damaging the magnets. Pay attention to that "50W" rating, though -- that means no more than 50W / 100V \$\simeq\$ 0.45A. ...


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