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12

There are a number of problems you have here: VGA is 15 pins, not 9 RCA is composite video, not VGA IBM 5151 is neither of those, it's an old standard "MDA" (monochrome display adapter). It appears from the internet that MDA isn't a subset of VGA - you can't convert from one to the other by simple wiring. Your options are: find an old IBM 5151 ...


5

Is there anyway that I can somehow connect this to my computer so that every time I click the button, it sends the signal of the enter key on my keyboard? Preferentially something that uses usb to reconfigure the signal. Yes you can do both. Find a secondhand USB keyboard. This shouldn't cost you anything. Open it up and removed the keyboard controller PCB....


5

Yes, it seems feasible. The bipolar transistors will not be a good solution. There are other ICs that could do this job, but this chip NJM2595 seems to be a very good and proper solution. About 10 years ago I tought about doing a project like this, but at that time I didnt find a IC like this (I tried a chip DG411 that didnt worked well with video, so I "...


5

According to Sunergia, A23-837-1 cross references to RCA part #176226. Encompass identifies it as TA7630P, a DC controlled dual volume, balance, bass, treble audio IC. This matches your chip's package and country of origin.


4

The "DIY EEG" does not show using an RCA jack. The project uses 3.5mm plug (same as headphone plugs). Here is RCA plugs : . Here is what the DIY suggested : . Also, the DIY stated As we will be using our computer's sound card to get the data in. . So they are using the sound card as the digitizer.


3

No, it isn't possible. An HDMI-to-RCA "cable" is really an active circuit that decodes the audio from the digital HDMI stream and converts it to analog. It takes advantage of the fact that the HDMI connector also has power on it. The switch itself is active circuitry that is designed specifically to regenerate the high-speed serial data streams used in ...


3

Afaik, there is no 'default'. There are many more types: 5 pin DIN (very old, obsoleted by RCA); mono or stereo per connector RCA (2 different plugs for stereo), mostly obsoleted by 3.5 or 6.3mm jack plugs; mono per connector Jack plugs (3.5mm used in most consumer devices), 6.3mm for more high-end devices (in general), mono or stereo per connector XLR ...


3

If you're trying to connect raw speakers to a computer, you can't do that. The speakers require a lot more power than what can come out of a computer. The computer can put out enough power for a pair of headphones, which you can only hear if you place your ears right next to it. If you tried what you wrote in the OP, you won't get much volume out of the ...


3

Yes, PCs have analog sound inputs (often both microphone inputs and stereo line level inputs). Normally these are on 3.5mm jack connectors though occasionally RCA connectors are seen. be aware that while these are analog inputs they are not especially good analog inputs. Noise is often high (especially on laptops), the input is AC coupled so you lose low ...


3

It will be fine. RCA connectors are found inside some TVs. I have this on 88-108 broadcast FM, and without doing measurements it is fine. Measurements weren't done because I didn't have access to suitable VHF test gear 25 years ago. The plug is still fine.


2

As @Arsenal correctly noted, it used to be a metal-coated plastic pin, and the metal broke off. I just discovered that after dissecting the cable with a knife. I also discovered that such knife can cut one's finger if one's not careful.


2

There are devices available such as this one (also available ready-built) that will do what you want. That might be bigger and more cumbersome than what you're looking for, however. In reply to comment: Not much simpler, for USB, although you may find something smaller, with fewer channels - just search for 'USB Relay'. This looks the most promising route. ...


2

A microphone is a transducer, a device that converts variations in a physical quantity, such as pressure or brightness, into an electrical signal, or vice versa. You didn't give a link to a datasheet so we have to guess what type it is. Coil type microphones work like a loudspeaker in reverse. The diaphragm is physically connected to a coil which moves ...


2

Assuming it's a normal composite video CCTV camera (most are). You should be able to splice on a RCA connector and plug it into the composite input of your TV. Splicing on a F connector and plugging it into the antenna input is not going to work.


2

That Wiki page sums it up pretty clearly. Except for the world crisis part, you mentioned. Why not use a commercially offered amplifier designed for the purpose? These days, there are fewer available amplifiers (in the US, anyway) which are designed only for this purpose (you usually have to buy more than just an amplifier), but they exist. They are rare ...


2

It is safe to assume that for the audio signal, those two RCA shells are common. Where life can get interesting, especially with a mains-powered turntable and mains powered amplifier, is control of leakage currents at AC line frequencies, due to unintentional coupling of mains to ground through proximity capacitance, and intentional coupling of mains to ...


1

if more than one such transistor is used, then disconnect one that works and measure it. The BETA may have been selected to be higher, or for matching. The breakdown voltage may be been tested, and a HIGHER Breakdown voltage transistor selected, because sustained high voltage was part of the operating conditions. Or faster switching devices were chosen, for ...


1

With ungrounded plugs, that tends to be normal, and most likely the device manuals say you are supposed to unplug devices while performing connections so you should not be performing connections while they are plugged to mains. The likely cause with ungrounded devives with 2-prong mains plugs is a EMI capacitor between unisolated mains side and isolated low ...


1

Figure 1. Voltage vs. time of sine waves at reference and line levels, with VRMS, VPK, and VPP marked for the +4 dBu line level. Source: Wikipedia Line level. The most common nominal level for professional equipment is +4 dBu (by convention, decibel values are written with an explicit sign symbol). For consumer equipment it is −10 dBV, which is used to ...


1

Yes, of course you can. But why involve any RCA connectors? Just get a 3.5 mm TRS (tip-ring-sleeve, 3 conductors) and wire it up directly. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


1

It is not normal, but is expected. I do not think there's something being failed, damaged or defective. These two devices are having different grounding designs. You PC, most probably, is having 3-wire plug, and its chassis is being connected to PE. The Yamaha receiver you use, with its service manual available here, does not have PE grounding, instead it ...


1

Just chop the spades off and solder the wires to a 0.1" pin socket and plug it into ADC1 or ADC2 on the Gertboard. If you don't want to destroy the cable that came with the equipment then go down to Radio-shack or Tandy (do they still exist) or Maplin (in the UK and maybe elsewhere) and buy a cheap RCA cable and butcher this to suit your needs. Or buy an ...


1

The TV probably uses an Op Amp to drive 1V line out so consider external Y to 3.5mm jack with 3.5mm plug from portable powered speakers and plug headphones into speaker jack.


1

Small signal relays might be your simplest and cleanest choice here. Reed relays might be an ideal selection. Selecting double-throw relays makes wiring the system easy - four relays in parallel powered by the same switch. When all are on three route the RGB signal to the output, and the fourth routes the composite nowhere. When all are off three route the ...


1

It would be CONN, SCART, Female, thru-hole PCB mount SCART 21 pin https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCART However the square posts may damage if using a plugin proto plug, so solder short resistor wires as pins using 1/4w and cut to length 3mm to have a round connection. However, these connectors are not common and mostly IDC ribbon interface. http://www....


1

As Peter has said if it is a standard definition analog camera then you can terminate to an RCA plug and connect to a composite input, typically yellow coloured. Just be aware there are some HD over coax cameras that will not work this way. Adaptors are a few dollars at most and this is actually fairly common. Some cheap CCTV test screens have RCA ...


1

Composite video normally expects to be driven into a 75 ohm load. I would suggest soldering a 75 ohm resistor into the back of a RCA connector (plug or socket as appropriate). Shorting the output out might work but it might also damage the output amplifier, I wouldn't reccomend it.


1

NOTE: This was a project to see how inexpensively I can hook up a dash cam. The camera itself was very inexpensive, and I did not mind damaging it in the search for the cheapest solution. Caveat emptor! THE ANSWER: Before investing in a resistor (see discussion in comments of my question), I tried the simple expedient of shorting the jack out with a piece ...


1

I found a YouTube tutorial going through step by step: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xONOLbupRV0&


1

You need to see what size of wire was used for that subwoofer connection. If it is small-gauge audio cable, that pretty much rules it out for carrying any significant power levels. Generally speaking, an RCA connector is good several Amps of current. I quite like that connector - it is robust and reliable in long-term use. RCA connectors are often used ...


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