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1

R1 and C1 increase the slew rate of the signal being seen by the comparator, to make for cleaner transitions between states. R2 and C2 establish the reference voltage used for comparisons based on the long-term DC value of the input waveform. It also prevents the reference voltage from drifting "off center" during asymmetrical input data patterns. ...


1

The usefulness of a highpass or differentiator depends on your signal. In a noisy environment a differentiator would rather harm. But if your signal comes in too much low-pass filtered a differentiator can help to restore the edges. Basically you then place the positive edge at the onset of a positive move and vice versa.


4

Justme's answer is very possible. Expanded here. I have used photodiodes directly connected to a GPIO pin, along with a small-value capacitor to detect light. A LED should work as detector too. The GPIO digital pins must be able to switch from input to output - most are versatile-enough to do this. It may help if the GPIO pins can generate an interrupt-on-...


8

Yes, certainly is possible. For further info, I suggest finding a copy of a MERL reseach report by Dietz et al from 2003 how they did it. It does not in fact produce enough voltage to detect it with the MCU directly. It usually is done in a way that enables the generated photocurrent to discharge the parasitic junction capacitance of the LED which is first ...


11

Ordinary LEDs can also be used to detect incident light, because they work as photodiodes too. You will need to amplify the incoming signal. Take a look at this projects (Jeff Han is the first one that used LEDs as sensors): https://cs.nyu.edu/~jhan/ https://hackaday.com/2016/06/17/ask-hackaday-whatever-happened-to-led-light-sensors/ Or google "LEDs as ...


2

You will not be harmed by receiving radio signals on an antenna unless you are extremely close to the transmitter. In any case, those signals are present at your location whether you have a receiver or not. It is also doubtful if you can receive a signal at 400 GHz if your receiver is only supposed to work up to 6 GHz. It is probably generated internally by ...


0

I have two such transceivers ... With two independent transcievers, there's no reason they should drift together in phase. You would have to supply both from the same 10 MHz reference signal if you wanted them to stay coherent. Even then, reprogramming one to a different frequency and back again would randomise the phase. Generally the absolute phase of a ...


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