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Back in the olden days, the 8088 and 8086 had four general-purpose registers, named AX, BX, CX, and DX. Those registers were all 16 bits wide. Each register could also be accessed as two 8-bit chunks, the high byte and the low byte. Those 8-bit chunks were AH/AL, BH/BL, CH/CL, and DH/DL. Assigning a value to AH changes the contents of the upper byte of the ...


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I'm a digital IC designer, but I have no knowledge on x86 CPUs. I think CL/CX/ECX are just software terms which are used to refer to different portion of a hardware entity (let's name it 'REG'). The 'REG' with certain bit width is the real memory device (probably flip-flops) inside the CPU circuit which is addressible. Why is CL for narrower 'REG' introduced?...


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That document does not describe how to do it. The chip datasheet does. It defines that resistance measurements are made with LSB resolution of 1/4096 of an ohm, unless told otherwise. So as the datasheet example says, a register value of 0x290 means the reaistance is 656/4096 = 0.1602 ohms.


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As other commenters point out, if you provide the data sheet and the processor info, and preferably with a wiring diagram, we can help you further. You need to read the sensor data sheet and determine how it maps a measured value (speed, position, weight, temperature) to a uint16. If the sensor is analog and you are using an analog input into your processor, ...


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