18

There are, in fact, ribbon cable stripping tools. For example, see this catalog. Here's another one: Typically the tool will come with multiple "blades", or these blades might be available as options. My Chinese no-name ribbon cable stripper (approximately $8, local store) came with 3 blades, one for 10 x 2.54mm pitch, one for 16 x 1.27 mm pitch, and one ...


14

It all comes down to impedance of the data lines. Basically the lines have a low resistance, but this is very different from what we term impedance in this regard. Basically at high frequencies such as used in SATA and USB3.0 for example (and in fact really anything more than around 100+MHz) the electrical signals travelling down the cable start behaving ...


13

Looks like Micromodul Series 30 from Lumberg.


10

The maximum voltage is defined by the insulation on the wire, not the gauge of the wire. It is the voltage (worst case) that the insulation can break down. The maximum voltage, as well as the maximum temperature, should be printed on the cable. The maximum current is defined by the cross-sectional area of the cable (AWG number). The table I usually use ...


8

The ZIF FFC connector on the listed device is designed to be mated with a 0.5mm pitch Flat Flex Cable (FFC), also known as a flat ribbon connector or ribbon jumper. You could either solder the other end of such a cable to a break-out, or use a similar ZIF connector at the other end, on your own board. Here is a Digikey search for 14-conductor FFCs ...


7

This is a common issue when interconnecting boards with ribbon cables if you do not think it through properly. There is no real resource for this, other than anecdotal answers like this one. Your proper method is to have the actual parts in hand when you are designing your system and see/understand how things are going to fit together and what that requires ...


6

I faced the same issue, and found a "budget" - and as such "less than perfect" - solution (I didn't want to wait the 2 weeks shipping for the tool, and saved some money too this way): get two similar straight, flat, and straight pieces of metal, that are longer than width of the cable to be stripped (the flat type PC card slot covers are fit for the job) ...


6

Mains cabling doesn't just have to supply power to your lamps; it also has to be safe in the event of a fault. If your lamp short circuits, you don't want the cable to burn out or start a fire before the fuse blows (if you're in a fused plug country like the UK) or the breaker trips! So standard 3-core mains cable probably is appropriate. See also MandoMando'...


6

EMI is NOT about data rate. It is about EDGE rate. The rise time of your signal edge is the determination of the frequency content of your signal. I know of a company with very poor board layout for high speed signals. But they were using a 40 kHz clock. However, as chip fab is pushing for smaller and smaller feature size, the rise times have increased. ...


6

"IDC" -> "Insulation displacement connector". That's not an IDC connector, it's a flat flex cable (FFC). And yes, you should be able to reconnect it. There are typically small tabs on the mating connector that you can pull back, then you insert the cable, and then push the tabs back in to lock the cable into the connector. As long as you do not damage the ...


6

Here is how you should do. It is actually very straightforward. The PCB footprint is the same on both sides, and the numbering is the same too. What you had wrong, probably, is that you weren't considering having the notch underneath the ribbon for one of the connector (and only one).


5

Signal integrity? What is the length of your ribbon cable? A long cable will cause your beautiful square signal coming out the driver looking bad at the load. And what is clock rate of the transmission into the cable? Fast transmission might induce signal integrity issues such as cross-talk between the lines. Try to add a GND line in between every signal ...


5

26 or 28 AWG for typical ribbon cables (like the one in the O.P. picture). Ribbons with bigger wires (smaller AWG) are more of a specialty. Here's a datasheet for your generic ribbon cable, which specifies the wire gauge (bottom of the page). P.S. Of course, if one wire in the ribbon can't carry enough current, you could use several in parallel.


5

A previous answer describes why transmission line effects might require multiple ground lines in a cable, But even at lower frequencies where transmission line effects are insignificant, you might want to include multiple grounds on an interface cable. The key reasons are to minimize interference and cross-talk. Interference from magnetic fields depends on ...


5

Had a similar situation recently. The steps I took were to put two layers of Kapton tap on the underside of the break to prevent further damage as I worked on it. I then exposed the copper each side of the break for about 3mm with the tip of a craft knife. I tinned this exposed copper (Kapron tape is heat resistant). used very fine tip iron 0.8mm and very ...


5

You can buy a roll of ribbon cable and a bag of connectors and make the cable to the exact length you need.


4

Check out Element14. Navigate from all products to "Cable, Wire & Assemblies" then "Cable Assemblies" and then finally "FFC / FPC (Flat Flex)" (http://au.element14.com/ffc-fpc-flat-flex). You can then select 10 connectors and the pitch spacing to 0.5mm and you should find what you need assuming the length is between 50mm to 229mm.


4

array of motors ... under almost no load Depending on the motor, even under low load current draw can be substantial. The current draw will of course increase under load, more so in stall conditions. using flimsy old ribbon cable to supply power to a motor is a bad choice Not necessarily true: Inside your CD ROM drive you may well find motors with a ...


4

I want to add something to Majenko's answer: You are mixing up voltage with voltage drop! If you are using a ribbon cable to supply your circuit with 12V DC, then the voltage drop across your cable is probably tiny - it's definitely a fraction of a volt, and it depends on the resistance of the cable. In other words, you are trying to calculate \$ P = IV ...


3

I want to add something to Greg's answer. Just a somewhat different approach to the calculations, which might be clearer. It's all just Ohm's law. In the circuit shown in his answer, there are three resistors: two 65mΩ and one 2.4Ω. The total resistance in the circuit is the sum of those three: .065+2.4+.065, which gives 2.53Ω. The battery provides 12V, ...


3

I think this is the type of membrane keyboard where the metal is extremely thin. It's often not copper foil as you might expect, rather I think it's printed silver paste. Basically, it has no structural integrity of its own, relying on the plastic for that. If you rub away the surface of the metal, you quickly discover that the surface is all there is to it. ...


3

That's a "flat flex" cable (not a ribbon cable), and the connectors are not really intended to be repairable. The proper fix would be to replace the connector with a new one, but this requires a person with fairly good SMT skills and equipment. If you do try glue (e.g., "Superglue", or cyanoacrylate), be extremely careful to keep it away from the actual ...


3

I'd do it to try to improve EMC shielding. Others may do it for something else of course.


3

Ribbon cable can be a good choice: If current isn't too high (as @NickAlexeev states), check the AWG number on manufacturers website. (eg. AWG28 => ~ 1A and 0.2\$\Omega\$/m) You can use several conductors in parallel to increase maximum current and lower loss in the cable. Advantage: You can use even conductors for powering the motor and the odd ...


3

All mobile style cameras I came across used one of any of the three common Mobile Industry Processor Interface (MIPI) connectors. The one shown above is an FFC/FPC connector style. LVDS FFC. Board to Board connector. Both LVDS FFC and FFC/FPC look almost the same, while the BtB connector is different. The connector above is a 30-pin FFC/FPC 0.5mm pitch ...


3

If the ribbon itself is mostly shielded by steel plate from the major sources of industrial plant noise, this will help. If you have enough spare wires in the ribbon, you should separate each differential pair on each side with ground wire signals, and keep one side dedicated to the serial signals, while the other side is all of your analog pairs (again, ...


3

The standard method of using this type of cable with dual-row 2xN connectors is to use crimp pins on the individual conductors, then insert the pins into an appropriate housing. These housings go by several different names. On eBay, people refer to them as "Dupont" connectors. The housings and pins (in cut-tape form) are really quite inexpensive. However,...


3

Yes, you can separate two parts of the ribbon cable relatively easy. You could just fold it in half too. If you separate them there may be interference if you separate a high frequency signal from its matching ground wire, or if you put the wrong one on top of each other. But this is highly dependent on the application of the wire. It wouldn't hurt to test ...


3

The connector you have chosen includes the strain relief bridge. As such you need the long latch. If you decide not to use the strain relief bridge, you will need the short latch version.


3

I'm sure you managed to fix it by now, but if anyone else ends up in a similar situation this is what I did. I contacted Das Keyboard for a replacement and got one sent at no cost to me. They also offered an out of warranty repair for $45 if i was unable to do it myself.


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