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38

It signifies nothing; it's part of a sequential list of EIA standards: -


28

It's the document serial number of the standard. Same reason why the HTTP protocol is also known as RFC2616 and the Javascript programming language is also known as ECMA262. The numbers themselves have no meaning. For example while EIA232 specifies the electrical characteristics of a digital serial communications system, EIA222 specifies standards for ...


23

Welcome to the biggest challenge with half-duplex communications systems. RS-485 is not a protocol, it's a standard which defines the electrical properties for a half-duplex(*) differential link. There is nothing in the specification about how data is to be sent over that link, or in fact how the link is used. As such RS-485 transceivers have no automatic ...


13

Yes. All almost ICs need decoupling capacitors. Devices such as these '485 drivers especially need them due to the current surges the device experiences when switching the signal states due to the low value termination resistors used on the bus lines.


12

In general, for short cables (< 20-30m) and low baudrates (< 115200) you can leave them out without much trouble. But: It is useful to put some kind of load on the signal lines to improve noise immunity (the RS485 driver will supply enough current to switch the voltage on the differential line, many noise sources will not). But you do not need this ...


12

RS-422 and RS-485 use the same electrical interface specification. If you use that interface to build a bidirectional link on a single pair of wires, it's called RS-485, and it supports half-duplex operation. If you use that interface to build two unidirectional links on two pairs of wires, it's called RS-422, and it supports full-duplex operation. This is ...


12

It is a myth that you can make RS485 interfaces work without the Common (C) ground wire connected up between the various devices on the bus. The receiver is only capable of measuring the relative potential between the A and B signals when the common mode voltage of the A and B inputs is kept within -7V to +12V of the GND reference of the receiver. The idea ...


11

Driver Chips and DMX bus termination When searching the internet you can see several chips being used to drive a DMX communication. They all are made to convert logic-level signals (LOW & HIGH) to the EIA-485 differential signal levels on the twisted pair cable. Very common are the chips from MAXIM that I also use for my implementation. The one I ...


11

You don't need any pull-up or pull-down resistors if you're driving those pins with normal output pins on your micro. DE is the 'Driver Enable' pin and must be pulled high while you're transmitting data. Depending on your micro and how you're using its interrupts you may need to be careful about when you pull it back low - check that all of the bits are ...


10

You are right in that a pure receiver could just measure the difference between the two signal lines. However, any means to do that will have some common mode range that the individual signals must stay within. The spec gives the common mode range that nodes must be able to tolerate. Without a third reference wire, there is no way to define this common ...


10

When comparing the physical layer only, CAN and RS-485 are similar in that they both use differential signaling. This gives them both good common mode noise immunity. The main difference is that RS-485 uses symmetric signaling. One line is 5 V and the other 0 V to signal one state, then flipped to 0 V and 5 V for the other state. This makes detecting the ...


10

I suspect the answer is in bold in the first line of your question. The resistor is between the data lines but the differential voltage is only a few volts - the common mode voltage can be anything but won't cause an increase in potential across the termination resistors. Figure 1. Extract from Linear's TIA/EIA-485-A Standard. The table above says that the ...


9

It's very similar to radio communication of the military or the police. A protocol is required. Master slave is easy and good for most cases. But another option is to do it like humans do: Listen. If someone speaks- wait. If you think no one speaks- you can speak. Wait for confirmation. If no confirmation received- speak again. If you want to broadcast,...


9

Looks like a common mode voltage problem to me. Although differential signalling, it still needs a common GND. (source) Replace your 1nf 500v capacitor with a jumper. Or wire signal ground to all nodes. Shield still stays connected to earth. The shield is connected to the Chassis ground on the various devices in the loop - and not at the 'master' end - ...


9

Short answer: yes. That should work just fine. It is quite common to use CAT5 for RS485. More detailed: RS485 requires a common ground reference for all devices. Yes, you can use spare pairs in the cable as ground reference. Proper shielded cables provide better noise immunity. But it is not by any means necessary for RS485 communication to work. Depends on ...


8

You can find the required voltage difference at the sending and receiving ends in the RS485 standard. As a second best, read the specs of some RS485 transceiver. What is probably the problem in your project (but it is difficult to reconstruct the original signal after a half-garbling filter) is that the common of your sender and receiver differ too much. ...


8

More than likely it switches into transmit mode when TXD becomes active and a diode and capacitor "latch" that first transmit edge and hold that voltage "active" for longer than at least one byte. I see a little surface mount diode on the PCB (D1) and quite possibly this is what I'm referring to. I have seen this trick done before and the only disadvantage ...


7

RS-485 and RS-232 a electrical-only standards. The same data encoding scheme is usually used on both. The difference is that RS-232 uses a single wire for the signal with levels below -5 V and above +5 V, while RS-485 uses a differential pair with 0-5 V levels. RS-485 is also intended to be multi-drop whereas RS-232 is point to point. You can chose to ...


6

If I had to design a product that needed to be able to connect to either CAN or RS-485, I'd probably start by considering separate connectors or separate pins on the same connector for the two busses. The ground pin can be common if on the same connector. Jumpers can be made to work, but users don't always set them right, especially if multiple jumpers ...


6

According to MAX485 datasheet, for DIP/SOP packages the ground goes to Pin5, and +5Vcc goes to Pin8. You seem to have the chip powered upside-down.


5

There are standard RS422/RS485 transceiver ICs available Here you'' find many pages of RS485 related ICs at Digikey You can use standard asynchronous serial data using RS485 if desired. "Rolling your own" multistation code should not be too hard [tm], but it's an oft invented wheel - there will be many people already offering software (much for free) that ...


5

SAE J1708 uses RS-485 transceivers, but connects the serial transmit data to the enable line of the driver rather than to the data line. This means that the driver is effectively switching directions on every bit. This is similar to CANbus, in which one of the bit values is "dominant" and the other is "recessive". The logic of each node is supposed monitor ...


5

Per reference to Maxim APPLICATION NOTE 3884 How Far and How Fast Can You Go with RS-485? from Jul 25, 2006 (cited 2104-05-28): mentions rs485 and cat5 with measurements. The performance of a Maxim driver (the MAX3469 in this case) and an equivalent >driver from another manufacturer are presented What Factors Limit the RS-485 Data Rate? The ...


5

Use switch RS485 has a bus topology. The big problem is that if you have star topology, every ray of the star has to be terminated. This way, the master transmitter will be loaded with 16x||120Ω = 7.5Ω. Of course such small impedance will overload the transmitter. There is another solution however. You should use a switch and connect the master only to the ...


5

CAN can go up to 1 Mbit/s on busses up to a few 10s of meters. The passive state doesn't really slow down the signalling. A total of 60 Ω is pulling the lines together, which will make them do so quite fast. I have looked at bits on a CAN bus with a scope, and the edges have been nice and solid in both directions. Think of the fact that the passive ...


5

Joe - forget about hopes of finding a standard color scheme. The simplest thing is that the Reference (Common) lead will connect to the GND of the circuit. That should be dead simple to discover which one with a multi-meter. Finding that the other two will be the A and B lines. Hook those up one way and see if any protocol makes sense. If not then hook ...


5

Basically RS485 is a description of a bidirectional communications hardware interface in which devices speak a known, but adjustable baudrate and byte/character encoding is very similar to RS232. How you could send data-packets is described in versions or adaptations of the standard, but it's not very strictly adhered to. RS485 is commonly 2 wire for ...


5

Serial is a general communications scheme, where information (in this case binary data) is transmitted in pieces sequentially. There are a number of compatible and incompatible computer buses and protocols that use a serial communications. In the context of your question, serial is used as both a communication scheme and a description of the physical bus. ...


5

Some rules for RS485: First, the network needs to be one single string of nodes - NO branches and short stubs. The allowable length of stubs is related to your data-rate, but to be safe, you should strive to eliminate them. Second, now that your link is one long interconnect, you need a termination resistor at each end. The value of the resistor must match ...


5

I reverse engineered the exact board pictured in the asker's post. The resistor and capacitor values are not what are there on the board - I selected them for my own circuit. However the schematics is almost accurate - "almost" because I have added a 120 ohms impedance matching resistor and capacitors on the A+, B- lines.


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