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2

I assume you mean RC servos, with a three-wire connection consisting of power, ground, and a PWM signal. Can two 6V servos be connected in series to a 12V source, Not if you want them to work. First, the "top" servo in the string will have its signal line referenced to the "bottom" servo's power line; unless you make a special ...


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There is a relationship between voltage and speed. If you supply the motor with a lower voltage, your maximum speed will be limited. Looking at the datasheet, there are actually three separate ratings based on different temperature requirements. In what the datasheet calls an insulated installation, here are the ratings to maintain less than 60 degrees ...


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The power calculation is correct. At 500mA the regulator does dissipate 3W. The thermal resistance is 65°C/W so it would try to heat up by 195 degrees, which it surely cannot handle. The device does have built-in thermal overload protection, but it may have heated up too fast locally with the 3W before the protection would shut it down. And when it fails, ...


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The regulator can't irradiate 6 or even 3W power without a heatsink. 65C/W, so 3W means delta T = 195C, now add the air temperature of 25C you get that junction temperature would be 220C, so far too much. EDIT: Instead of using a linear voltage regulator, use a DC/DC step down converter- the servo motor won't suffer as it is not a low noise amplifier or a ...


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If it works when powered from USB, but not when powered using the buck converter, then there is most likely a problem with insufficient power of the buck converter. It is quite hard to read the circuit from the board layout (maybe add a real schematic). What is the "buck converter" you use? Is it a device somewhere on the board or the build-in ...


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