New answers tagged

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I think this is way more fit to MathSE, but... First of all, I see that the last two columns of the singular value matrix are zeros, what does this mean? The singular values matrix can always be seen as the actual singular values \$\Sigma\$ and some "padding" zeros \$\mathbf{0}\$, so that you could match the size of \$U\$ and \$V\$. You could have either:...


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The "proper" way to do this, as you asked, is to use an audio transformer per channel. Pricey though. The way we've got round this on a PA installation I operate is to use unbalanced auxiliary outputs to drive the power amp. The main outputs on our mixer (a Yamaha MX12/4) are balanced XLRs so we use two of the unbalanced 1/4" group outputs to drive the (...


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It depends if you have a true balanced output. If you do, grounding the "cold" line is OK. If you don't, Tony's answer is better because it avoids the short on the "cold" (ring) to gnd. If the mixer only has jack (not XLR) outputs, I'd doubt it's to full professional standards, so read its manual carefully. (OK it does have XLR ... still, its manual ...


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(Added) It depends if sleeve = Pin 1 is a supply, shared or floating Gnd. If unsure; Use either Pin 2 or 3 for each L/R channel but use same pin # to be in-phase. Do not short pin 2-3 on XLR, otherwise audio will mute (cancel)


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A pole has \$s\$ in the denominator which lowers the impedance of a capacitor with rising frequency. When the capacitor is used in a shunt mode relative to a series R, this results in attenuation with rising frequency, giving a log-log slope of -1. In the reversed orientation, a series cap. with a shunt R, it results in a "zero" or increased ...


3

But, if I plot the Bode plot of this transfer function I see that it behaves as a lead compensator, which could have the problem of amplifying noise at high frequencies. A single pole at high frequencies is basically a 1st order low pass filter so, beyond a certain frequency noise doesn't get amplified any more. You don't obtain noise attenuation - the ...


3

You can make a non-causal system that 'predicts into the future by T seconds' causal, and thus realisable, by adding a delay of at least T seconds. There are cases where it makes sense to think about non-causal filters, because other things being equal, you can usually design a 'better' non-causal filter than a causal one. One case is in audio ...


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The solution: I contacted the support from the oscilloscope and they mentioned the firmware version was too old and had to upgrade it since USB IF changed the impedance on the new fixtures to 100 ohms, the oscilloscope was expecting 90 ohms.


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The quoted Allion set of test fixtures is not designed to test HS eye with naked 50-Ohm cables. The test fixture for device measurements is and high-speed differential probes (or two active singe-ended probes) must be used with this fixture. The fixture with two SMA connectors is used for INPUT from signal generator to test the receiver sensitivity. If you ...


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That eye looks like its levels are designed for HS operation. LS and FS modes use a higher differential voltage. This waveform looks like it's clamped by diodes between the lines.


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When you decouple a MIMO system you turn it into a series of SISO systems. So you transform your system from a single 2 inputs 2 outputs system into two independent SISO systems by having a diagonal matrix. Moving the unstable zero to one of the inputs you can control which output is affected. The result is that only one of the outputs remains decoupled ...


2

A fractional frequency divider is rarely used by itself to provide a divided-down output. Although the divider you describe would on average produce an f0/2.5 signal, such a signal is rarely useful due to the large amount of jitter it has on it, as edges on the output signal obviously have to align with input signal edges. Instead, a fractional divider is ...


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1) Brute force calculation brings the result for you. If you take the definition of the RMS voltage and apply it to a sum, say A+B where A and B are different random voltages, you have (A+B)^2 to be integrated, That's A^2 + 2AB + B^2. The integral of a sum is the sum of integrals. But the product AB as integrated reduces to the cross-correlation function at ...


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(1) the resistors are physically separate. Thus the motions of electrons jumping orbits, or jumping from atom to atom, or grain to grain, will not be correlated. (2) The 3dB frequency for electron (thermal) noise is about 200 Terahertz, because the electron jump time is a few femto-seconds.


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I didn't get how the O/P terminals above is connected to the wind wave. Doesn't such a potentiometric wind vane have 3 terminals? Which terminals are connected to the O/P in this case? The wind vane is configured internally as a variable resistor, rather than a ratiometric divider, hence why there are only two terminals. We can't be certain why it has ...


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Why they choose one or other method is uncertain - but the current source driven method should work well enough. Change 741 opamp to LM324 (quad) or LM358 (dual) The transistor provides a current source of about 0.5 mA- see below. The windvane is connected as a variable resistor (2 wire connection) and not as a potentiometer (3 wire connection). Both ...


1

From the document you linked: - What could be the reason they are using current source? To convert resistance (linear with wind direction) to voltage linearly. Doesn't such a potentiometric wind vane have 3 terminals? Not according to the document you linked. They are using it like a rheostat.


-1

The mouse has three states; unclicked (contact closed) clicked (contact open) click to unclicked (contact was open, now closed) The Contact is either 'open' or 'closed'. In the closed state the mouse is unclicked, in the open state the mouse is 'clicked'. The signal will appear like an on-off which the computer will recognise as a 'click'. The computer ...


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I am wondering, which signals does a 3-pin mouse switch send It is a passive device and it doesn't send signals; it can be regarded as an open circuit (high impedance) or, when activated, a short circuit (low resistance). This means that signals can pass through the switch or, get blocked by the switch. or is it able to differentiate between 3 states ...


1

The mating cycles seldom affected the touch performance in our studies where we were working with the TI captivate sensors. Rhe mating cycles wil definitely I created the contact resistance of the foil or the whole sensor connection collectively The variation in the resistance will not significantly impact the quality of the capacitive sensing application ...


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I believe rlocus() only gives the stability of gain in the feedback loop (as in the form G(s)/(K*(G(s)+1)).) You can't find the root locus for any arbitrary gain that way.


3

I want to generate some output signal with some sophisticated shape that are not simple sin or square wave or something we know. How should we design the circuit in between to achieve that? The usual way to do this is to use store samples of the desired output waveform in a memory (EEPROM, for example), and feed them to a DAC at the correct rate, then ...


1

Non linearities in the transistor will inevitable make the loop gain equal to 1 at some peak to peak amplitude and, the natural impact of this is that the amplitude is difficult to precisely predict (not normally a big deal). The second impact is that the sine wave output will be naturally flattened on one or both peaks and, again, this is often not regarded ...


1

Your input (when open) looks like 500K||6pF maybe (Edit: maybe a bit more with the ground (??) plane), and there's a gain of almost 50, so even 0.1pF of parasitic capacitance from the output to the non-inverting input could be enough to cause oscillation at the ~1MHz you are observing. It would take even less from the 2nd op-amp output. So it's probably ...


1

In feedback systems the feedback signal is fed back to the input of the amplifier. This definition does not require that it is added or substracted from an external input signal. In oscillating systems there is no input node - however, if you want you can create an input node and you can use it - for test resp. calculation purposes - to connect an external ...


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Just regard it as an amplifier with feedback where the real input is set to a value of zero: - in negative feedback the feedback signal is added to the input signal, in positive feedback is subtracted. So in the first situation we use and adder circuit, in the second one a subtractor circuit. Feedback +/- input is the same as feedback +/- 0 when the ...


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I began to prepare this answer with some hesitation. Looking at the attractive (and interactive) colorful Falstad simulation and detailed explanations in the subtleties of an indisputably great professional, I wondered, "Is it possible to counteract all this with a simple human explanation based on intuition and common sense... and illustrated with hand-...


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