5

I highly recommend LTSpice. While not open source, it is freeware, and has very up-to-date models for things like NMOS transistors, and for many simulations is the fastest SPICE implementation out there. Be sure to adjust the number of cores to suit your system, and make sure it is generating object code - this makes it very fast. Performing a DC sweep ...


4

You need significantly more capacitance from each rail to ground. Try 470uF or something like that in parallel with C3 and in parallel with C5. But if you're using a fancy high performance amplifier like that one, you're probably going to want to regulate the supply rails in reality. So that would mean a positive and a negative regulator, in addition to ...


3

If your negative power supply voltage is 0V, you can't put 2V in the inputs:


3

Duty cycle shortener (winny's suggested name): - The lower waveform in the picture above can be used for top-left and bottom-right switches. An inverted version of the middle waveform (use a NAND gate instead) can be used to activate top-right and bottom-left switches. Choose logic gates that have schmitt trigger inputs. Choose RC to give appropriate time ...


3

It depends on what behaviour your real voltage supply might have. If your real voltage supply is a battery it has a rather good defined internal resistance. LTspice allows you to model that if you edit the parameters of your voltage source. If your real supply is a SMPS it gets more difficult. SMPS usually have shutdown procedures on overload. This must ...


3

You have to put some amount of resistance in series with your voltage source. The simulator is giving you an "ideal" source, while any physical source will have some nonzero amount of source resistance. You can also add a hard current limiter made from a current source and an ideal diode: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


2

Upon changing resistances, it mostly only affects the negative voltage. I.e reaches a positive peak of 20V but does not reach a negative peak of -20V, like 0.01 out. The Ground symbol on L2 short circuits it to the other ground symbol on R3 which is your output ground, making the rectifier diodes useless. Remove the ground symbol circled in red... But I’...


1

You are probably seeing a high ripple voltage onthe supply rails. You need bulk storage capacitors of 100 uF or more from each supply rail to Ground. The existing capacitors do not store enough charge to keep the voltage somewhat stable betwwen the AC voltage peaks.


1

Capacitors are too small to hold enough charge between AC peaks. Increase capacitors to 100 uF for testing. And C3 polarity is wrong.


1

Considering that this is a UK mains power supply what transformer resistances are usual? The model above works for a simple transformer. The other thing AC mains transformer do is have saturation and coil resistance. AC mains transformers saturate for safety reasons, this is difficult to model in spice as one needs to model the saturation, and it can be ...


1

Is there possibly another command or action that might be better suited for what I am trying to accomplish? Use .param a=0 .step param x list 1 2 3 and set the value of B1 to V={a+x}


1

What @jonk said is true, but you can "cheat" a bit by using a parametric divisor, something like this: PULSE(-15 15 0 {0.1u/x} {0.1u/x} {0.4u/x} {1u/x}) .param x=1 .step param x list 1 10 1000 Alternately, you can make it a bit more readable by making the rest of the values parametric: PULSE(-15 15 {td} {tr} {tf} {Ton} {T}) .param T=1u/x Ton=0.4*T tr=0.1*...


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