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Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) will extract the maximum amount of power available from your solar panel. For this small amount of power output you probably want the best efficiency you can get. Using a supercap won't give you 5 volt regulation if that's what you're trying to achieve.


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The "60A/50A/40A/30A/20A/10A" is the maximum amperage the controller can handle. You would want to size the controller based on the total amperage output of your solar panels. You have a 100 watt solar panel and if you hook it up to a 12 volt battery: 100watts / 12 volts = 8.33 amps, you would need a 10A solar controller. If you had a 1200 watt solar array ...


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This low cost charger gives you good; short-circuit protection,open-circuit protection,reverse protection,over-load protection., Dual mosfet Reverse current protection ,low heat production. As long as you follow instructions on connect/disconnect sequence. it does not give you MPPT control of PV ( more cost option) Low V protection ( this is controlled ...


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If you want whatever battery protection the charge controller provides, feel free to attach it to the DC Load terminals of the charge controller. That is what it is for. The inverter is a DC load. However make sure the charge controller can handle the DC ampacity the inverter can draw. If the inverter instructions are saying to hook it up to the ...


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The problem is a solar panel has very different output characteristics to a battery. Usually we would talk about 'max power point tracking' (MPPT) where you control the impedance to extract the most power for the conditions. At the very least you need to re-think your values. Sunnyskyguy has posted information on that. Though I think maybe a redesign with ...


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The huge difference between a battery which is a voltage source and a PV panel which a current source is impedance. A charge needs a low impedance based on the need for a low voltage drop to rise in current ratio. Any time voltage is transformed up by N, impedance is also transformed down by N\$^2\$ thus stressing worse your design problem of impedance ...


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There's a diagram on the page you link showing that the inverter should be connected to the battery direct. These controllers have a DC out that is intended to allow it to disconnect the loads at a particular terminal voltage, so that the battery doesn't over-discharge, but in this case the capacity of that output is limited (it's probably done with a MOSFET)...


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The solar controller you bought goes between the solar panels and the battery bank. It is designed to control the charging of the battery bank only, not to control the inverter / battery connection.


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You are not seeing an increase in your battery voltage for two reasons: The solar cell is NOT providing its full current/voltage capability, so your perception of 'full sunlight' is wrong. Test your solar panel on it's own and use a light meter to get some idea of the span of capability the panel has. Your ESP12F IS NOT asleep, it's just in a lower power ...


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You should be able to measure the sleep mode current draw and determine where the current is going. Always active are the L293, the LM1117 and the sleeping ESP. None of these should be close to the notional 150 mA PV input current. The most likely "rogue" load is the ESP not being in sleep mode. You MUST NEVER "float" modern NimH batteries. Older batteries ...


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You need overvoltage to charge NiMH batteries, or batteries in general for that matter. Do note where it says that constant voltage charging is not a good idea, you need to control the current. According to Wikipedia, the minimum charging voltage is 1.4V per cell so you'd need 4x1.4 = 5.6V to charge it. You should check the charging voltage to make sure it ...


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The inverter may or may not have an inrush, the refrigerator certainly will. They will typically have a vicious starting current, sometimes even 10x the nominal running current. There's not a lot you do about this at the fridge motor. Most folks simply oversize the inverter and its supplies sufficiently. As the fridge inrush is mostly reactive, some smart ...


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To answer one small piece of your question, the component you have linked in your question will not work in the circuit you have shown. USB power is 5VDC while your calculations show you're planning on a 12VDC system, so you can't just connect the wires directly. You will need to include a 12V USB Adapter similar to this item USB Adapter. The azimuth of ...


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The problem is that googling the chip markings produces no useful results Not sure how your Google foo is then because, when I search "20S0045" I get: DSS 25-0045A http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/123607.pdf but that uses a different package (2 pins and a tab) and I get: SM74611 http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/sm74611.pdf which is in a TO-263 which ...


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simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. Diode connection. There will be a small voltage drop (0.7 to 1.0 V) across the diodes but it shouldn't cause any problems.


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You want electricity. What you want it for is kind of irrelevant. You want it, and for your own reasons, you're looking at solar as a starting point. Solar is lovely when space is plentiful and light isn't a problem. But storage of electricity isn't reliable at the temperatures you're looking at. So other options are: temperature controlled environment for ...


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What is your actual Voc/Isc=Zmpt and efficiency? MPT is when this impedance is matched on the PV array around 82% Voc in full sun and shifts down towards 70%Voc at half power. Step down SMPS conversion to battery might be max 90% efficiency. What do you get? For all the above parameters: Voc max min. Isc max min. Vout CC I out CC use the above to ...


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Having read-up on the subject, I believe this might be due to the solar charger being a PWM type - not very efficient. I've just ordered what claims to be a MPPT solar charge regulator (much more efficient). MPPT does not make the charger more efficient. It loads the solar panel in a way that draws the maximum power that the solar panel can provide for a ...


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A solar simulator is use to approximate the spectrum of the sun but do so with some control. The biggest reason is if you wanted to simulate cells in all sun conditions, you would have to go to the equator, where the sun is brightest at ~1000W/m^2. A solar simulator allows you to vary the power and take the measurements you need (and you don't have to wait ...


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