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The "60A/50A/40A/30A/20A/10A" is the maximum amperage the controller can handle. You would want to size the controller based on the total amperage output of your solar panels. You have a 100 watt solar panel and if you hook it up to a 12 volt battery: 100watts / 12 volts = 8.33 amps, you would need a 10A solar controller. If you had a 1200 watt solar array ...


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This low cost charger gives you good; short-circuit protection,open-circuit protection,reverse protection,over-load protection., Dual mosfet Reverse current protection ,low heat production. As long as you follow instructions on connect/disconnect sequence. it does not give you MPPT control of PV ( more cost option) Low V protection ( this is controlled ...


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If you want whatever battery protection the charge controller provides, feel free to attach it to the DC Load terminals of the charge controller. That is what it is for. The inverter is a DC load. However make sure the charge controller can handle the DC ampacity the inverter can draw. If the inverter instructions are saying to hook it up to the ...


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There's a diagram on the page you link showing that the inverter should be connected to the battery direct. These controllers have a DC out that is intended to allow it to disconnect the loads at a particular terminal voltage, so that the battery doesn't over-discharge, but in this case the capacity of that output is limited (it's probably done with a MOSFET)...


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The solar controller you bought goes between the solar panels and the battery bank. It is designed to control the charging of the battery bank only, not to control the inverter / battery connection.


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On the face of it, not really unless you use switches to take the batteries offline while you charge them. Now if you can use 2 chargers, and the chargers have a floating (ungrounded) output, you could connect each one across each battery. If the batteries are to be kept online ensure that the charger has current limiting and reverse-current blocking. Or, ...


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Check the battery datasheet for proper voltages that are exactly correct for your battery. Otherwise use safe values. I have a commercial solar battery charger that by default overcharges the battery once per month to 15 volts to equalize the cells. Otherwise it charges it to 14 volts. These voltages can be changed from the user interface. If you use too ...


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I found the issue and resolved it. The GATE was directly connected to the DRV pin(as mentioned in datasheet) which was creating low resistance path. But when connecting the multimeter to measure the DRV pin voltage, means some extra resistance is added to that line and it was working. So I added a 22 ohm resistor between the GATE and DRV pin which worked ...


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