11

Fix a lever of a precise known length to the specimen and add calibrated masses. Measure the deflection with a dial gauge. Perpendicularity might be a concern and could be addressed with geometry... However, the error that introduces is probably small compared to other sources. The sources of errors may well be worth checking. I know that for the ...


7

The schematic seems to have an error. The center taps shouldn't just be connected to each other, they should also connect to the +12 V supply. On your linked page, this is confirmed in the text: The Stepper Motor is a Unipolar Type in 5 wire configuration. The center pin is shorted internally and is connected to the supply (12V here). And in another ...


7

Turn to the 'drawings' tab on the data sheet you linked to. You'll see that the boss around the output shaft is threaded M5.5x0.5. Drill a 5mm diameter hole in your plate, tap it M5.5, and screw the motor in. You've done the right thing by choosing a motor with a data sheet (many don't). But you have to read it for it to work.


6

My first guess is that the newly activated leg of the H-bridge is starting to conduct before the leg being deactivated is fully off. Do you have any mechanism on the source signals to prevent overlap at the edges?


4

Put the bead on the side that connects to the driver board. The bead will suppress CM noise from the board.


4

This is a big stepper motor. The motor inductance of 8mH per phase is an indicator that is made to be used with high voltage stepper driver, like 325 VDC or 230VAC rectified, with a chopper driver, that has a current setpoint. Have a look for similar model: Sanyo Denki It has near 4mH per phase, similar to yours if you connect 8mH phases in parallel and it ...


4

I think measuring the motor current is not a bad idea. I wouldn't use, however, a strong stepper motor directly but a weaker one in combination with a reduction gear. That way you get many rotations at the motor axis even if the angle of torsion at the specimen is only very small. So the current measurement can be averaged over several turns. I assume that ...


4

Since these are quadrature controlled stepper motors, inverting direction only required swapping wire in each pair polarity. Since each winding wires will be adjacent pairs, to change both polarities; Change 12,34 to 21,43 or Rd Yw, Gy Gn to Yw Rd,Gn Gy The home command will rezero the counter steps. (now in the desired direction) Reversing ...


4

I think it might be worth considering the gate-source capacitance of your MOSFETs: - They are nominally about 5 nF and I've added them on a portion of your circuit for you to consider. If you remove T8 and T10 you should be able to prove this. With T8 and T10 removed, if you still get the spike then it's gate capacitance passing the gate drive voltage ...


3

I made a small robot with 4 28ByJ-48 5V steppers, however I think the 5V is the minimum recommended voltage they will run on. By increasing the voltage to the motors from 8V to 11.5V - I noticed quite a substantial increase in torque, and I could run them at a higher RPM before they started mis-stepping. I was able to run continuously and over heating was ...


3

No. That is a simple motor. It cannot be changed into a stepper. To use a simple motor then you will need feedback, an encoder. You will be better off getting real stepper motors or servo motors.


3

The cheap L298 modules don't have a chopper or current setting so you have to add a big power resistor in series with each winding if you want relatively high performance. You could also lower the supply voltage to about 5V from 12V which would work, but the motor would not be able to accelerate as fast. To get 2V with a 12V supply, you would need to throw ...


2

As the title suggests, am I able to apply 12V to each winding of the 28BYJ (5V version) to increase the torque? That depends if you mean the ultimate torque or the torque at speed. When a stepper motor is being rapidly switched, the back EMF of switching the windings means that rated supply voltage can't immediately achieve rated current, and if the dwell ...


2

The answer to your question really depends on what type of stepping motor you are using. In this case from the web link you provided they are discussing a unipolar stepping motor where the phase coils are bifilar wound and act very much as a transformer. Here is a schematic with the simulation so you can see the waveforms. simulate this circuit –...


2

No, you have the right rating, it is just that you have a much better motor than in the tutorial. The motor in the tutorial is a high voltage, low current one. The problem with this is that as a result it has a high inductance, and meaning that it take a while for current to rise to the rated value after each step, which means that the torque when stepping ...


2

You can read in the datasheet that 1A-1B are a pair(motor coil 1), and 2A-2B are a pair (motor coil 2). So 1A and 1B should go to one coil, and 2A and 2B should go to the other coil. That means you should probably solder your wires straight. I don't know about the polarity of your stepper motor of course, so it might run the wrong way or something... ...


2

Try this code, and change pin number to your like. if this code work, likely the problem is in the delayMicroseconds number, some Stepper motor only work on higher than 300 and some on more higher number. when delayMicroseconds number too low, it will stall and sometime only humming. when powerup, motor will spin clockwise, and if you push button, it's ...


2

So, what do you guys use to make your steppers to behave to meet CLASS B? I use a closed frame (faraday shield) with filters on the power to meet class B. If the motor cables need to go outside the frame, I use shielded cable. One thing that may be an advantage to knock out 100Mhz+ signals is to short them out with capacitors. X2Y capacitors are ...


2

If the stepper position is out of sync with the driver they will often do this until the driver and rotor positions align. This is why normal practise to to 'home' the motor on system startup and then leave the driver enabled (so the rotor is held by the fields in the correct position), any time you need to take the driver off line you should probably redo ...


2

If you look at DRV8825 datasheet you have detailed specification. At full step, the currents in both wingdings are 71% of the current setpoint value, meanwhile at 1/32 micro stepping the current is 100%, but it is sinewave like - AC. For sine AC waveform it is true that \$I_{RMS}=0.707\cdot I_{peak}\$. The total max. current is the sum of both phases. ...


2

This will depend on your specific motor driver a little, however if you can set a current limit on the driver, you can use the lower voltage device with a higher supply voltage, your driver will get a little hotter depending on the method it uses, but it also will give your actuator a higher maximum torque and higher top speed in general. This is quite ...


2

Think about it for a moment. Even if you know exactly how many steps the motor makes during each movement, there's no way to determine the direction of the movement from the EMI emissions. Therefore, there are two possible answers for each movement, and you can't know which one is correct as the starting point for the next movement.


2

Make a torsional pendulum and measure its frequency against a known intertia. Orient the test piece vertically, clamp the top end, add a known disk inertia to the bottom end. Now you have a torsional pendulum. Twist the bottom disk a small angle and measure the frequency of torsional oscillation. Optical measurement is easy, and the sensors are inexpensive. ...


2

The amount of current through the stepper coils is determined by your driver circuit. Typically with commercial modules there are some DIP switches that can be used to set the motor current (for example from . You can check your motor datasheet and driver manual (for example, this and make sure the set current is within the motor rating. The torque is ...


2

No, it won't cause any damage, at least in non-pathological cases where you're not exceeding some shaft or drive train mechanical limits and are applying a torque directly to the stepper shaft. A similar thing happens when you try to accelerate too fast and the motor loses steps. Nasty sound but not really a problem for the motor. The coil current is set ...


2

Probe the coil arrangement out with an ohmmeter, and assuming that might be satisfactory for you, then compare the resistance and maybe inductance to catalogs of manufacturers with similar physical sizes to estimate the current and voltage requirements and likely performance. Don’t worry too much about polarity, worst case you reverse one pair to reverse ...


2

It pays to read specs. Standard Voltage: 2V Phase current: 1.2A Phase resistance: 1.7 ohm The Hi+Lo side drivers have some specs which are roughly equivalent to 1 ohm per side, so you have... Pd= 5V^2/3.7=6.75W per phase x2=13.5W with 2/3.7=54% of the total power dumped into the heatsink which based on about 1sq"/W (my rule of thumb) makes this ...


2

Your motor has a total step of 600. It means, for a complete revolution, you have 600 steps. Hence the resolution appears to be 360°/600 = 0.6° per step. This is the resolution in what is called FULL MODE. However, your motor can works in STEP MODE 1/8. That means that you can move the motor by 1/8 of a step. Hence, you can achieve 8 more steps and thus ...


1

Get a 12v5amp wall wart. Use 2 or more dc-dc buck converters to get the 5v and 3.3v supplies. Plenty off-the-shelf modules available these days at low cost. Use lot's of capacitors. [Added another idea] Alternatively, get a power supply used in desktop PC's. They are cheap yet robust enough due to volume production, and provide 12v, 5v, 3.3v ...


1

Well the cleanest option is to have it use a single 12VDC coming in from a wall AC/DC converter. Then you would have voltage regulators to get the specific voltages you need within the unit. Easiest way to do that is to have a custom PCB made, enabling the regulators to be done on board. If that isn't an option, you should be able to get pre made voltage ...


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