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Based on your tests, this appears to be how the coils are wired. The center taps are connected internally, which is not a problem if you are using a uni-polar driver, they will be connected anyway. However, you will not be able to use a bipolar driver without modifying the motor. You will need to do more testing to determine the phasing. If you connect a ...


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A question: got a spec for the motors you intend to use? That will settle the max coil current, more or less, as it will have a DC resistance spec. Now that all said, know that doing a good stepper drive means managing the current through the coils (usually with PWM), and doing some tuning based on the motor electromechanical characteristics. If you do this ...


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I remember these drives need a comparatively long pulse width. Checking the datasheet (page 9) of this drive confirmes this. The minimum low time is specified to be 2.5 microseconds. In your code you set the pulse immediately high after setting low. This might explain the jerky operation, every now and then it misses pulses, resulting in inconsistent driving....


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Acceleration may be limited by; current limiting, lack of low ESR bulk cap on supply. excess load, friction or lack of software control to prevent skipping with controlled acceleration or rate of change of velocity. Verify these are not the problem. Show all settings on DM542T.


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Your motor has a total step of 600. It means, for a complete revolution, you have 600 steps. Hence the resolution appears to be 360°/600 = 0.6° per step. This is the resolution in what is called FULL MODE. However, your motor can works in STEP MODE 1/8. That means that you can move the motor by 1/8 of a step. Hence, you can achieve 8 more steps and thus ...


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As I commented on the question, you're probably better off with conventional relays given that: their cost scales better as you go for larger/more powerful motors they are less complicated (since you stated that you've never designed a circuit before) Having said that, if you wish to pursue the solid state approach then you're probably aiming at (MOS)FETs ...


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Comparing the specs of the two motors side-by-side, there are some significant differences: Model 17HS13-0404S1 datasheet Model 1704HS168A-OB datasheet Both are standard NEMA-17 size mounting plate. Both are bipolar connection. Both are rated for 12VDC operation. Specification | Model 17HS13-0404S1 | Model 1704HS168A-OB | Amps/Phase | ...


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I don't know grbl, but the stepper motor concepts apply to most systems. The motors appear to be similar, both are bipolar (2 phase), 1.8 deg/step. I believe that your problem is elsewhere. The controller/driver converts pulses to phase drive voltages. You generally want to use microsteps for smooth operation. The controller/driver has a steps per pulse ...


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The solution is quite simple: a) Choose the voltage of your power supply. The TMC2130 can operate from 5…46V. The higher the voltage, the better the driver is able to drive current through the motor at higher speeds, because the ratio to the back voltage induced from the motor is higher than with lower voltages. 24V is a common supply voltage in industrial ...


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The cheap L298 modules don't have a chopper or current setting so you have to add a big power resistor in series with each winding if you want relatively high performance. You could also lower the supply voltage to about 5V from 12V which would work, but the motor would not be able to accelerate as fast. To get 2V with a 12V supply, you would need to throw ...


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It pays to read specs. Standard Voltage: 2V Phase current: 1.2A Phase resistance: 1.7 ohm The Hi+Lo side drivers have some specs which are roughly equivalent to 1 ohm per side, so you have... Pd= 5V^2/3.7=6.75W per phase x2=13.5W with 2/3.7=54% of the total power dumped into the heatsink which based on about 1sq"/W (my rule of thumb) makes this ...


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