12

What could be its purpose? It's an EMI shield and the off-shield connection will connect to the live-side DC bus on the PCB. I've had to implement one myself. Radiated emissions from the transformer were just enough to cause an EMC compliance failure but, the copper tape solved it. I used a 90% wrap around the ferrite and maybe, if I'd "played" a ...


7

Now that we've got the formula and source reference we can see that the source mentions on page 8 the area product which is different to the "area of product" in your question. (If you want an "of" in there it would be the "product of areas" rather than the other way around.) Core Selection: Size A novice in the art of ...


6

Without a schematic or circuit drawing, I can only compare spec to spec and part to part. The P6KE110A is a transient voltage supressor (TVS) diode rated at 116V breakdown, 152V clamping and 600W (peak pulse) dissipation. A 1N4148 is a general-purpose diode rated at 100V - it is not a TVS and is not intended for repetitive high-voltage breakdowns. They most ...


4

Let me give you an answer since I am the author of the note you gave as a reference: What is the maximum limit for the bulk ripple: there is no real specification and a rule of thumbs given by Unitrode a while ago was 20-30% of the peak line voltage. Therefore, for a 85-V rms voltage (120 V peak roughly), you would size the capacitor value for a valley ...


3

Actually suppose there is the same number of windings between the two outputs, Vout1 is equal to 2 times Vout2. Without cross-regulation, nope. Imagine you regulate only Vout1. Vout1's load current flows through Vout2's winding. So Vout2 will vary with Vout1's load. One common solution is using discrete windings and connecting the bottom end of Vout2's ...


3

As @Transistor stated, it's the Area Product, not Area of Product. The value can be used to select a core for required power level. It's the product of core's central area which is given as AE, and the winding window area which is given as AN (aka AW). Please note that, unlike how @Transistor has shown in his answer, the value of AN is determined entirely ...


2

This is an excerpt of the book I wrote on switching power supplies. The exercise consists of stabilizing a buck-boost converter whose schematic diagram appears below: In the left side of the drawing, you can see a list of variables. These variables correspond to information extracted from the open-loop response of the power stage. However, considering the ...


2

You can use a multiphase buck converter such as this one: - Input is 30 volts to 70 volts Output is 12 volts at 180 amps (2.16 kW) Note that this is a 6 phase device and the full circuit is shown in the data sheet on page 46. To get down to the required input voltage range for the LTC7871 use an isolating forward converter to produce circa 50 or 60 volts (...


2

It's all about load regulation and the different voltage dropped in the diode rectifiers when different loads are applied on V1 and V2. The transformer has no leakage inductance This simplifies things. However, full loading on one output will cause a volt drop due to the dynamic resistance of rectifier diode. If that output (V2 for instance) was ...


1

Being the author of these free ready-made SIMPLIS templates, I can answer the questions. When the PWM artificial ramp is of 2-V amplitude, you have to limit the maximum voltage excursion of the op-amp to limit the duty ratio. For instance, with a 2-V peak voltage and a maximum duty ratio arbitrarily fixed at 80%, then the maximum excursion applied at the PWM ...


1

You are exceeding the maximum recommended supply voltage for the TPS2590 (20 volts) and that means the data sheet information cannot be relied upon. You are also within 1 volt of exceeding the maximum operating voltage. Not a good choice for 24 volts. It would be OK for a 12 volt power supply I reckon: - The addition of an LC circuit (i.e. a resonant low ...


1

No need to worry about the driver, it will not sink more current than its own abs max regardless of how little impedance you have to the gate. The part is designed to drive FET gates without the user having to worry about the peak current due to the gate capacitance. It's the internal driver circuitry that limits the current, not the external components ...


1

The op-amp must be biased so that it does not rail up or down. It means the 12-V source should not be 12 V but slightly less or more, depending on the open-loop gain of the op-amp. You can easily add an auto-bias circuit as shown in the below template: You set the op-amp output to 2.5 V for instance (far from the min or the max output) and the E1 source ...


1

First of all, never connect a power supply directly to a Li battery. You have two option to charge your battery. The fastest way is to find and purchase a Li-charger "module" or a "power-bank module" which is designed exclusively for charging Li batteries. The second way is to use ICs designed to this purpose (like TP4054) and build your ...


1

You don't show the whole circuit, so it is impossible to give a precise answer. Your upper PWM signal will need to be isolated from the lower one with a circuit that rejects up to 1000 V of common-mode signal at 50 kHz. An optocoupler might work, but you also have to provide power to it on the output side. When you power this circuit up, the generated ...


1

In my experience, good-quality lab supplies will use isolated DC/DC bridge conversion topologies, e.g. phase-shifted/resonant transition full bridge. These topologies allow for brick-wall current limiting, a wide voltage adjustment range, and are very resilient - the powertrain is quite robust. Pure resonant topologies (like LLC) are less useful for lab ...


1

As far as I can tell a single aluminum polymer cap is better and cheaper than the 4 tantalums specified by the datasheet. ESL for the aluminum polymer I cited is zero at the 260K frequency this SMPS operates at. Ripple Current rating is 2.8A versus 4 x 0.63A = 2.52A Voltage Rating is 10V lower, but doesn't require as much derating as the tantalum, and I'm ...


1

https://electronicbase.net/low-pass-filter-calculator/ 10mH and 4.7mF give 93Hz cutoff frequency. Assuming your PWM is at 930Hz. Power falls as 20dB (x100) per decade (x10 frequency). Your filter is just 1 decade below working frequency in this example. So AC power that remains is 20dB lower, or 1% left. It is likely okay. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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