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Figure 1. A solenoid hold-on pushbutton switch by EMC. There are solutions available but they're likely to be expensive and hard to come by. Figure 2. Momentary illuminated PBs. Random web image. Once there's a micro-controller most of us would just use an illuminated momentary pushbutton. Illuminate the LED using a GPIO output when the button is pressed ...


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Yes, you can combine them — in fact, it's rather straightforward: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Your question is not entirely clear about whether the 12V applies to the switches or the loads, so I've kept the diagram completely generic. The coils on the relays need to match whatever the switch power supply is in ...


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The datasheet you linked to covers multiple variations of the switch. I count 14 different part numbers. There are multiple voltages and colours. The note under the table states there is a resistor included in the switch and special voltages can be made to order. It is probable that the LED will light up on the 12v version if you apply 5v, it will just be ...


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I'm assuming it means it only can carry 300mA or 0.3A at DC voltages. So you cannot use these directly with your actuator. You would need a circuit to take those switches and control a relay/mosfet/transistor to control the actuator.


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Yes the relay coils can be wires in parallel so each switch can be SPST and the electrical supply for the lights can also be in parallel, You appear to be proposing this circuit, which will work. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab But two relays in parallel can be replaced with a relay that has more contacts. it's usually ...


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Yes you can. But they do not need to be in different addresses, unless you want to select all of them simultaneously with the first mux, but then they can be all connected to the MCU directly without the first mux.


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Can anyone confirm that such a product exists in a form factor like a standard panel mount switch? What you are describing is most likely not commercially available. The reason for this being is electronic switches are easier to make these days. Search timer pushbutton switch. Most of these will not have the mechanical functionality you describe. Another ...


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You need 4PDT switch, because MIDI is a balanced current loop. So two pins must be switched from each connector, and you have two connectors.


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simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. Implementation using a 4-pole 2-way switch. Figure 2. The 12-way rotary switches such as those made by Lorlin are available in 2-pole, 3-pole, 4-pole and 6-pole versions. A tabbed washer under the lock-nut limits the number of switch positions as required.


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Connect the pushbutton to drive a relay coil. Then connect the relay's NC and common primary contacts where you would normally connect the NO push button terminals. Note that the relay coil will always consume power when not pushed though...The idle current will be whatever the relay's coil current is which could be some tens of milliamps. simulate this ...


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Since they permit both AC and DC power for the LED, I suspect there's some sort of electronics that is pre-conditioning power for the LED. I would say, try it. Apply 6VDC to the LED and see what happens. If it works, try applying 6V reverse polarity, which is unlikely to harm a 12V LED. If it lights in both polarities, that cinches it, there is a ...


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You may actually be able to do a lot better than having to switch 34 wires. Take a look at the floppy connector pinout: http://www.interfacebus.com/PC_Floppy_Drive_PinOut.html First of all, half of the wires are grounds, which you can just connect in parallel. Secondly, the cabling is actually designed for two drives to share the same cable, with a '...


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Consider thisl note the output has only a WEAK drive ability. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab The circuit will provide almost rail-rail output, using the impulse coil, which I assume is just about a short (< 100 ohms). Or you could use a comparator that accepts inputs as low as GND. Some older ICs with PNP inputs ...


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the switch is not electrically connected to the socket and fuse. it also looks like those pins are on the back of the switch. It's probably isolated and non-isolated switch illumination. the data-sheet will say for sure.


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Connection of shunt can be automated using a 3-pin connector. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. (a) With internal burden the CT's AC out feeds directly in. (b) When the meter's internal shunt is required a loop in the CT plug provides the connection. (c) The internals of the meter. Wire a loop between AC and SHUNT ...


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