10

Shorting the input to ground can damage some regulators because the output capacitors and multifarious bypass capacitors which may be connected to the output discharge through the regulator. It's not necessarily easy to tell from the datasheet whether that is true. You could add a resistor between the switch and ground to reduce the chances of that happening....


4

If you are going to ground it, perhaps then through a high resistor, to avoid any instantaneous current spikes upon switching, or any severe back draining. Generally, I connect input signal pins to ground, even internally unconnected pins. Open pins on active devices (which is not your case - yours is a power pin) can cause undesired noise or even signalling ...


3

You're both forgetting that there's a very low resistance path through the motor. If the MOSFET is switched off pin 2 (and the tab) will be pulled high by the motor. Figure 1. The 10k resistor will have negligible affect compared to the low resistance of the motor. R6 is not required.


3

I think the accepted answer said that you can only use an RC trick to de-bounce a switch that is tied to low, but I think that is not true. You can do it for high as well. Here is the schematics. There is a veritable de-bouncing Bible that recommended the following schematics: RC de-bouncing, R1 tied to high, actuating the switch grounds it. However there ...


2

Yes, you will burn out the switch. The thing that you can put between the switch and the pump is a relay. Choose a relay with a coil current below 50mA, and with contacts suitable for your pump current.


2

You could use an OnSemi NDP6020P, which is a P-channel MOSFET (for high side switching) and is through-hole and logic level. There are very few through-hole logic-level MOSFETs. Many, many more possibilities in SMT. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab The datasheet for that (your) product is behind a registration wall so it's ...


2

A comparator with hysteresis can enable a switch device (power MOSFET, relay, etc.) when the cap voltage exceeds one trip point, then disable the switch device when the cap voltage falls below a second (lower) trip point. The switch will remain off until the cap voltage exceeds the first (higher) trip point, and the cycle repeats. The comparator device can ...


2

Your LED load will have a series resistor to limit the current through it. You can therefore detect if (a) the series resistor has a voltage drop across it or (b) if the resistor/LED_Anode voltage has fallen below a threshold level. Both can be done with a comparator or, more easily, with an ADC if there's one within the microcontroller your schematic half-...


2

A couple of things: Your circuit shows an N channel MOSFET, so you probably want to have it as a low-side switch, instead of high side one--like you currently show. You need a series resistor with that LED to limit the current flowing through it. The switch is OK, but you may want to add a pull down resistor from gate to GND to make sure the NMOS is OFF ...


2

A few alteration to the circuit could be done. Somethings like this. NOTE: Putting n-channel MOSFET near to ground is recommended. LED is a diode basically, whose voltage drop depends on the color(red:1.2V, green and blue: 3.3V), so a resistor in series has to be provided for LED not to get damaged. If you are using 2-3mm LED(those small through hole LED), ...


1

A 3-position switch would be implemented in z-wave by independent 2 on/off switches, and the "3-position" function is programmed as a "radio-button" activating one or none (but not both) of the 2 on/off switches. If it's ok to switch one or the other mode, and no hazard exists if both are on, as in your case (no harm if timer is on and ...


1

Turn the switch around! make the common terminal go to ground, the mute position connect the end of R55 to ground, and the remaining terminal short out the red led (or use an NPN transistor if sinking the current is undesirable).... simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab You will want to refine it a bit, as any DC on the output of ...


1

If your GPIO is set at 0 volts, Q1 will be on and, if the GPIO is higher in voltage, Q1 will still be on. This means M1 will always be on: - You need to connect R2 to ground and not 3.3 volts. Alternatively, why don't you ditch Q1 and directly drive M1 from the GPIO via a 100 ohm resistor. What load are you using and what voltage are you measuring across ...


1

I plan to place button at about 50 meters (roundtrip) away from the host The chip in question: - The spec for the chip is insufficient to provide protection against indirect lightning current surges and this is likely to be a problem with 25 metres of unshielded (or shielded) wiring (inside a home or outside). Given that the inputs can exceed the power ...


1

Use an RC filter like this to remove any high frequency interference. R1, R2 and C1 should be as close to the MAX6818 as possible. Do not connect the GND end of the push button to the local ground, leave it floating. Use a shielded, twisted pair for the long cable. A shielded twisted pair is better than an unshielded pair, but it really depends on how much ...


1

Pushbuttons are susceptible to 'bouncing' and can generally be dealt with using software. This example from Arduino illustrates a possible way to implement a delay to prevent bouncing. The wiring looks good though!


1

The emergency latching push button switch, also known as a mushroom push button switch (Pilz SchaltgerÃĪt), is used to cut off, through it's NC contact, electrical power to a machine / electrical equipment under an emergency situation, to avoid injury to personnel or damage to the equipment. The mushroom button S0 is released, by rotating it, when the fault ...


1

By the look of it, it could be an electret pressure switch. An electret microphone would serve as a differential pressure sensor if the opposite sides of the electret could be isolated.


1

If your circuit is simulated correctly, it will show the expected behavior. In this case the time \$t\$ defines the firing angle.


1

It's an SPST rocker switch with a 1.85V 10mA LED as the status indicator. The switch terminals are 1 & 2 and the indicator terminals 3+ & 3-. The value of the LED voltage dropping resistor R would depend on the supply voltage. Here are the cut-out details for mounting the switch.


1

I thought I was buying a normal 3P rocker switch :) simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. (a) A 3P (3-pole) switch would have three independent contacts. (b) A 3P2T (3-pole, double-throw) switch would have three changeover contacts. (c) What you've got and how to wire it. You've purchased a 1PST (one-pole, single-throw) ...


1

It looks like you can control the LED of this switch separately from the actual switching. If you apply +/- on the "3" contacts, then it will light up the LED on the switch. Then "1"/"2" are the contacts for the switch, simply giving you an open/close. Unfortunately, it doesn't look like it is what you wanted if you were ...


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