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33

LCD: liquid crystal display. Works by adjusting the amount of light blocked. Usually has a backlight but might not (clocks, calculators, Nintendo Gameboy). The green-black ones can be very cheap and are a mature technology. Response time can be slow. TFT: is a type of LCD with a thin film transistor attached to each pixel. All computer LCD screens are TFT ...


8

The question appears to be essentially about how light can pass through the conductors connecting to each pixel in an LCD display - and secondly, how the connectivity to individual pixels can be achieved without interfering with the densely packed pixels themselves. For the first query, the answer is transparent conductors. The most well-known such material ...


7

Since the display includes the Ilitek ILI9320 controller, then your interface requirements are much lower, as the microcontroller no longer has to interface directly with the TFT and instead only talks to the controller chip via a simple interface: either SPI, which takes six wires: RS, CS, CLK, MOSI, MISO and RESET. Or you can use an 8080-compatible ...


7

All LCDs require refresh. On the character displays, this is usually hidden from you - you're not connecting directly to the LCD segments, there will be a driver chip intermediating. This can remember what the segments are supposed to be, because it's a relatively small amount of data. By comparison the high resolution graphics displays would require much ...


5

The SD card is 20 MHz and I know the performance would suck for an 800 x 480 display, but will the hardware do it? No. The LCD driver needs to be able to access its framebuffer as memory. SDIO isn't memory-mapped, and QSPI won't drive an SD card.


4

The Renesas R61581 is an intelligent display controller that handles all of the high bandwidth tasks needed to refresh the display. The control interface allows a microcontroller to send commands and data to load the in-built video RAM. It is an ideal choice to drive with a medium scale microcontroller. The datasheet can be downloaded here. Much of the ...


4

Yes, you can draw graphics on this display. You can draw graphics on any display that is (individually controllable) pixel based, i.e. it mentions a resolution, something like 128 x 160 in the specs. They are referred to as "Graphic" displays. Common types include STN, TFT, OLED. The other common type of display is usually referred to as "Alphanumeric",...


4

The "i80" parallel interface is simple and fast, and can be driven by external memory interfaces on some microcontrollers. However, it's a wide parallel bus, and requires a lot of pins to drive. SPI requires very few pins to drive, and is available as a hardware peripheral on many microcontrollers. It's slower than the parallel interface, though. The VSYNC ...


4

Looking at the SetXY function, it seems the controller might be ILI9341. Here's a datasheet for that controller: http://www.newhavendisplay.com/app_notes/ILI9341.pdf. There's two points that strike me at this time; hopefully as new information becomes available, I can extend the answer. First of all, are the definitions for SCREEN_WIDTH, and SCREEN_HEIGHT ...


4

I've found the answer! I missed the fact I didn't configurate a PE6 pin as ordinary GPIO output thus I couldn't reset my LCD.


3

According to page 17 of the controller (SSD1289) datasheet (provided in a zip file from the link you mentioned), the controller can be addressed in different parallel widths. Further, you can also use serial bus to use even less IO lines.


3

While some display controllers cause flicker any time they are written, this particular controller shouldn't have that problem. I would guess you are having flicker because on each update you are writing parts of the display with one value and then rewriting them with another. To avoid flicker, don't do that. Figure out what the correct value should be ...


3

Based on your clarifying comments, it sounds like you're managing to power the display through its protection diodes. It's really remarkable that it's working as well as it is, under the circumstances. You need to hook Vcc on the display to 3.3V and Gnd to ground in order to make sure that all the logic on the display's controller is getting the correct ...


3

Individual LEDs can be used as light sensors: they behave like photodiodes. OLEDs are potentially capable of behaving like this as well (they're also semiconductors), but I can't find reports of anyone having tried it. It's probably extremely inefficient. LCDs cannot: they operate by applying a field to twist the crystals, and there's no photosensitivity ...


3

The datasheet of the LCD tells you the signals that must be present on the LCD interface pins. How you achive that is up to you, you can bit-bang the signals on GPIOs, use an-on chip or off-chip LCD controller, a custom-programmed FPGA, or even black magic. The LCD doen't care. In most cases, the 8/16 bit interfaces (and for smaller LCDs, SPI or I2C ...


3

It would probably be a big challenge to get that display working with an Arduino, for a few reasons. It has an 40-pin flat flex connector. You'll need a suitable socket to plug it into, which breaks out the signals to something breadboard-friendly. How will you interface with it? It says it has an 8/9/16/18 bit interface, but does it have data sheet ...


3

An LCD doesn't emit light. It either has a reflector behind it, or a separate light source (backlight). The backlight may be controllable on any scale from a monolithic whole to a pixel. The LCD selectively blocks light. In a color LCD, each pixel will have 3 segments which correspond to red, blue, and green filters. Color is achieved by blocking these ...


3

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/LED-backlit_LCD LCD transmissive displays are either diffused edge-lit or back lit. The edge lit are spot LEDs on 1 or 2 sides constrained into the edge of the glass by U metal brackets with diffusion plastic layers between glass and crystal layer to spread the backlight evenly. For large LCD screens they use large diffused ...


2

There are two common approaches. One approach is to wire all the unused bits to a fixed value (typically zero). This will cause a slight loss of brightness, but 3% really isn't worth worrying about. The other is to wire them to the upper bits, in sequence, so a 5-bit color value would be wired as [D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 D4 D3 D2]. This will cause every fourth ...


2

For maximum brightness range, connect the unused lsbits to the lowest bit of your source. Just connecting to 0 will limit maximum brightness slightly.


2

The INT057ATFT uses an SSD1961 controller, whose I/O can be configured in Motorola 6800 mode or Intel 8080 mode. So if your microcontroller has an 8080 type interface you can connect it without problems. But also a microcontroller without external address or data bus can talk to the LCD controller, of course. The left side connections are the only ones you ...


2

I think you will enjoy watching "The Ben Heck Show". laptop screen with its laptop As Russell McMahon pointed out, the ltn152w5 seems to be a laptop screen which is probably some proprietary, difficult-to-work-with interface. I wouldn't bother using it unless you have the exact laptop it is designed to connect to, and just want to rearrange the ...


2

A quick search shows that is an OEM display intended for laptops. That will likely be taking an RGB signal. Possibly VGA but it is hard to find data about it since OEMs like that will not release specs unless you are a manufacturer. I would recommend looking at something that you can control over SPI or I2C, like this perhaps: http://www.crystalfontz....


2

I think the connector you need is one like this or similar. They seem to be quite common now, I suspect if you type in "FFC 39" (or "FFC" and then select results with 39 pins) most of the results will be similar. Here are the results I got when doing this on Farnell, I only checked the first two but they both had the same pattern (I selected the second as ...


2

Experimentally wrap tinfoil round the cable, and earth it at the driving end. Or the chassis, but not both. If that works, you can find a better way of screening the cable. Or a series termination at the driving end of the clock signal; this will somewhat slow up the clock edges; in other words reduce the harmonic content. I have my doubts about this : if ...


2

The EPSON datasheet has an incorrect formula for calculating the value of the horizontal display width register (HDISP [16h]). The formula should read: HDISP in number of pixels = ((REG[16h] bits 6-0)) x 8 Instead of: HDISP in number of pixels = ((REG[16h] bits 6-0)+1) x 8


2

Answer 1: If you don't know anything about the impedances I would always use series termination in the range between 50 and 100 ohms. Which value you choose is not that critical, but as a rule of thumb: When the communication still works with a higher value, choose that. EMI is caused by reflection due to impedance mismatching. The intended Signal will have ...


2

If possible, I'd recommend to use 3V3 for the entire circuit; the ATMega is perfectly capable to operate at 3v3. But if you can't for some reason (if you already have a board that depends on 5v to work, or whatever), use the staple for level shifting, the TXB0108. Since it has just 8 lines you'll have to use probably 3 of them (for 18-bit rgb and other ...


2

The datasheet seems pretty thorough, and the core functionality looks pretty straightforward. Once everything is set up, you clock in RGB values one pixel at a time. First you go across a row, then down a column.The relevant control signals are: DR[7:0] - 8-bit red value for the current pixel DG[7:0] - 8-bit green value for the current pixel DB[...


2

There may be a thousand reasons why the LCD is not working. It could be one of these for starters: Not fully understanding the documentation. A connection problem. Any one of a number of problems with the software algorithm. A signal timing problem of not meeting protocol requirements at the display. A signal integrity problem due to voltage level errors, ...


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