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11

Type-C cables must include CC lines, so they all support USB-PD communication. Not all Type-C cables support the full range of power capabilities that USB-PD specifies, however. The major differentiation is supported current. Passive Type-C cables support up to 3A by default at any USB-PD voltage range (standard voltages for fixed sources are 5V, 12V and ...


7

In a word, no. You need to implement the USB Power Delivery protocol through the CC line of the Type-C connector and that's a two way communication at 300kbps complete with preamble, CRC and so on that is pretty much impossible to do without a microcontroller. The PD message format looks like this: For full details you'll need the USB Power Delivery ...


3

As Finbarr noted, you need to implement Power Delivery communication protocol to negotiate the 20 V output profile. The PD specification was designed by a community of more than 300 fine engineers from top semiconductor and software companies. It took 3 major revisions and about 5 years of work to come up with current functional standard. Trying to implement ...


3

No Not all USB Type-C Cable supports USB PD by default. Electronically marked cable supports USB PD and "may" support upto 100W A USB Type-C cable which is not electronically marked can support upto 15W.


3

Something like this or this should work just fine for you (but see the entire lineup, you might like different model more). The only problem with 12V power banks is that they tend to be rather on heavy side, which can be a burden while hiking. I think you should also explore solar power alternative. While smaller solar panels won't be able to provide 1A ...


1

If you are making something for your own home office or garage, you can use whatever low-voltage connectors/wires you want, including Type-C connectors. However, these connectors are designed for high-speed communication with low-profile portable devices in first place, and power delivery is sort-of secondary. As high-speed (10 GHz range) connectors, they ...


1

usb-c pd afaik has some IC on both ends that do the charging logic. without it I fear you might just fry whatever you attach to it..... easier to just get a solar panel with the usb-c pd ic integrated. Like: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07SW3GZ64/ref=psdc_2407761011_t2_B0785WCZG7?th=1 or https://lifepowr.co/shop/sun20c/


1

Any regulated 12V battery or battery pack will work fine. Your car battery with a cigarette lighter adapter would be ideal. You will still need the charger. The 1000 mA spec on the power supply is more than sufficient to power the charger. You can very likely use a battery with less than a 1000 mA output. I manufactured a product that used about 300 mA ...


1

It's complicated but doable. There's someone who has implemented exactly that and offers the PD buddy sink on tindie: https://www.tindie.com/products/clayghobbs/pd-buddy-sink/ Code: https://git.clayhobbs.com/pd-buddy/pd-buddy-firmware/src/branch/master/docs/console_config.md Hackaday project site: https://hackaday.io/project/20424-pd-buddy-sink/details


1

I found the answer for my question: Do all USB Type C cables support full power delivery In order for a USB-PD compliant source to advertise capabilities greater than 3A (or up to the full 5A limit of the spec) the Type-C cable must be an Electronically Marked Cable Assembly (EMCA) and support SOP' packets. It must respond to the "Discover Identity" ...


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