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1 vote

how to map 1V - 10V to 1.6V to 3.2V for voltage regulation using TL494

When you're mapping one voltage range to another there's a scaling factor and an offset. Take the range of the voltages you're converting from, you've stated two different ranges, 10-100 and 1-10, we'...
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3 votes

Why does voltage reading increase the greater the resistance load?

Your circuit is a voltage divider and behaves exactly as expected. Nothing special about one resistance being called "internal battery resistance". The circuit theory doesn't care very much ...
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0 votes

Why does voltage reading increase the greater the resistance load?

Because the resistance, should 'resist' and thus lower the voltage... Which means, in my understanding, that the lower the value of your resistance, the lower the voltage drawn from the battery. Your ...
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-1 votes

Why does voltage reading increase the greater the resistance load?

Shouldn't the greater the load resistance be, the smaller the voltage? Because the resistance, should 'resist' and thus lower the voltage. Josh pushing the car. Image source: Omegaman on Flickr. ...
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2 votes

Why does voltage reading increase the greater the resistance load?

If you had an ideal battery (ie without R1), then you would measure the same voltage whatever the load (resistors R4 and R5). For a real battery, with an internal resistance, you can think of it as an ...
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  • 2,568
1 vote

Why is the output voltage in my second op amp not the same as for the first op amp?

Note that the Vcc and Vee pins of the U1:A (pins 8 and 4) are unconnected. Whatever Proteus does when these power pins are disconnected, is resulting in an output of 24V, which of course is impossible ...
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3 votes

Why is the output voltage in my second op amp not the same as for the first op amp?

in my circuits the voltage source is 12 volts. tutorial says the output gain should be 2.and it is happening in my second circuit but in first one that is designed with transistors it does not give me ...
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0 votes

Power Supply Module Internal Trimmer circuit / Remote Programming Resistor Value?

V+ changes with both values of Rb on S+ to V and Ra to S-, resulting in matched voltages to error amplifier. Rb adds to the string that derives the feedback ratio to result in 1V without Ra. Ra lowers ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Power Supply Module Internal Trimmer circuit / Remote Programming Resistor Value?

It changes the R2/R1 voltage divider and therefore the voltage at the non-inverting input of the error amp. TDK actually will forward requests to their engineers if you contact customer service; here'...
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  • 6,530
5 votes

Term similar to "gain" for voltage dividers

A more general name for the three possible cases (devices) may be "transfer ratio" K = Vout/Vin where: K < 1 - attenuator, K = 1 - follower, K > 1 - amplifier. It is interesting that, ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Is it normal that an analog voltmeter has about 7K ohm input impedance?

Why would it be MΩ? It is an analog meter. Specifically (from image): DC, Permanent Magnet Moving Coil (D'Arsonval Meter Movement), 1.5% error on full-scale reading, vertical mounting, difficult to ...
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4 votes

Is it normal that an analog voltmeter has about 7K ohm input impedance?

That is an industrial panel meter. Typically we want a sensitivity in the 1mA F.S. range for robustness and so they behave well with vibration and shock. It has a moving-coil DC movement, and either ...
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0 votes

Is it normal that an analog voltmeter has about 7K ohm input impedance?

If it is an analog electro-mechanical voltmeter without any solid state amplifier, how should it be possible to make megaohms input resistance with a wirewound coil and a resistor in series? You need ...
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